%s1 / %s2

Playlist: Hispanic Heritage Month

Compiled By: PRX Editors

Curated Playlist

Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month Sept. 15 - Oct. 15.

Below are picks chosen by PRX editorial staff. You can see all potential pieces for Hispanic Heritage Month by using our search.

Hour (49:00-1:00:00)

American Dreamer: Sam's Story

From Long Haul Productions | 59:00

Every year, an estimated 65,000 undocumented students graduate from American high schools. Raised entirely in American culture, they finish high school only to find themselves in a peculiarly American limbo. "American Dreamer: Sam's Story" is a first-person longitudinal radio documentary sharing the experience of one of these kids.

Sam_small   “American Dreamer: Sam’s Story” tells the story of a talented and articulate young jazz musician named Sam, who was brought to the U.S. at age 5 by his Mexican parents. He stayed out of trouble, was drum major of his high school’s marching band, fell in love with playing jazz on the tenor sax, and got his diploma with honors– only to find that for an “illegal,” graduation marks a dead end. .  Though Sam dreams of attending college to study jazz performance, he hides his status from even his closest friends, and can’t legally work, drive, get financial aid, or even gain admission to some colleges.  "American Dreamer" follows him from his high school graduation, through the following summer, as he struggles to raise money to continue his education and weighs the risks of working and driving illegally against his own desire to achieve his American dream.

The Latin Alternative (Series)

Produced by WMHT

The Latin Alternative is a one hour weekly exploration into the world of Latin rock, funk, hip-hop and electronic music.

Most recent piece in this series:

The Latin Alternative 1422

From WMHT | Part of the The Latin Alternative series | 58:59

Latinalt_small It's another 'New Música' episode featuring our favorite new tunes in the genre. This week we feature brand new music from Jungle Fire, Quantic, Babasonicos, Alex & Daniel, Israel Kantor and much more.

Latin-American Philosophy

From Philosophy Talk | 53:59

How does Latin-American philosophy distinguish itself from European and American philosophy?

Kenjohn_small

Latin American Philosophy began centuries before anything of much philosophical consequence happened in North America. Yet in our own time, Latin American Philosophy is undergoing a protracted identity crisis. Is it just transplanted European philosophy? A reaction to analytical philosophy? A reflection of the themes of liberation theology? John and Ken explore Latin America's philosophical traditions with Joseph Orosco from Oregon State University, author of Cesar Chavez and the Common Sense of Nonviolence.  This program was recorded live at OSU in Corvallis.

The Spanish Hour with Candice Agree (Series)

Produced by Candice Agree

There's no better way to know a country or a people than through its music. The Spanish Hour with Candice Agree invites everyone who has an interest in, a fascination of, and a love for the cultural life of Spain and the Spanish-speaking world to be entertained, enriched, and informed by this unique classical music program.

Most recent piece in this series:

THE SPANISH HOUR: SOUTH AMERICAN CLASSICS FROM "A" TO "V"

From Candice Agree | Part of the The Spanish Hour with Candice Agree series | 58:30

138_1_small One was born of Italian immigrants, another was born in Berlin, and yet another was born into one of South America's most distinguished musical families. Yet Carlos Guastavino, Juan Antonio Sánchez, and Evencio Castellanos all contributed to and enriched not only the musical life of Argentina, Chile, and Venezuela, but of Western classical music.

Los Reyes de Albuquerque y La Familia Martinez (59:00 / 53:00) [FREE PROGRAM]

From Paul Ingles | 59:00

The story of one of the most long-lived and influential traditional New Mexican Hispanic musical groups in the state, Los Reyes de Albuquerque. The Martinez family, the heart of the group, has experienced its share of highlights and heartaches over more than 45 years of performing.

Roberto_from_gbr_small Los Reyes de Albuquerque y La Familia Martinez is a documentary project telling the story of one of the most long-lived and influential traditional New Mexican Hispanic musical groups in the state of New Mexico, Los Reyes de Albuquerque.  The ensemble has been at the forefront of presenting, preserving and perpetuating traditional New Mexican and Mexican folk music since its formation in 1962 by Roberto Martinez and Ray Flores.  For all those years, the group has performed public concerts in clubs, theaters and town squares; schools, senior centers and nursing homes. The Martinez family, the heart of the group, has experienced its share of highlights and heartaches over more than 45 years of performing.  Two of the five performing children lost their hearing in their 20's.  Two also died of cancer in middle age.   Still, the family has continued to present and preserve the music of the land, the music of the people.
 

Paul  Ingles and photographer Genevieve Russell followed the group on several of its tour stops.  Ingles, a veteran audio producer, recorded the music, interviewed the group's members, and the concert-goers who have been touched and inspired by Los Reyes.  Russell, a professional photographer and new media storyteller, photographed the musicians in performance as well as the Martinez family at home.

The project includes the broadcast of an hour-long documentary, development of a website (www.losreyesstory.org), the creation of a film for a public event and online, and the creation and distribution of CDs and DVDs to schools and libraries around the state of New Mexico.


BEAT LATINO 027: DIVAS LATINAS

From Catalina Maria Johnson | 59:05

Check out all of Catalina Maria Johnson's Beat Latino pieces, with Latino music and commentary.

Beatlatino-diva_small Beat Latino celebrates in every hour a different facet of the extraordinary diversity of the Latin & Latino musical universe. This edition of Beat Latino, "Divas Latinas" pays homage to  legendary women of Latino Music.

The selection includes women who have been jailed and exiled for their music (Mercedes Sosa, Argentina); extraordinary composers (Chabuca Granda, Perú); artists who revived nearly forgotten musical genres (Susana Baca, Perú) or have reinvented traditional genres (Lila Downs, Mexico)...as well as artists who simply made our hearts sing along.

Hosted in English and Spanish by Catalina Maria Johnson, so that nearly all who enjoy the music will also have access to the information.

Broadcasts nicely during Women´s History Month or just about anytime!

Episode 2. Prequel: Early Contacts

From ERIC V. TAIT, JR. | Part of the Then I'll Be Free To Travel Home-the Legacy of the New York African Burial Ground series | 59:00

Segment 2 of Then I'll Be Free to Travel Home chronicles the early, historic and highly significant Hispanic presence/impact on the founding of the New Netherlands Colony in the early 1600s.

Family_small Before slavery rears its ugly head in North America, Africans and people of African descent traverse the northeastern part of the continent as free entrepreneurs - traders, guides and interpreters; men such as Matthieu Da Costa, and "Jan" Rodrigues. Who they were - especially Rodrigues, the man the Dutch called "The Mulatto" - how they interacted with the Europeans and Native Americans, their value and impact, is the heart of Segment #2, and aptly sets the stage for the next segment.

LatinoAltROCK

From Raul Escobar | 53:27

LatinoAltROCK was created with the goal of sharing the music that is part of our cultural experience, with a wider audience.

Latinoaltrock_small Pablo, Emily & Raul presents: LatinoAltROCK.
LatinoAltROCK will cross continents like nobody's business and open up a window into Latin Music everywhere.

We are not just crossing continents; we'll also hear collaboration between artists from all over the world. For example we have: Los Transatlanticos, collaboration between Colombia and Croatia, or like Sarazino collaboration between Algeria, Ecuador and Nigeria. We'll also have brand new music from Mexican Institute of Sound, Kinky and from Culture Cry Wolf.

Hispanic Heritage Special: "Music of Baroque Mexico"

From WFIU | Part of the Harmonia Early Music series | 59:02

An hourlong program of baroque music of Mexico, including works by Gaspar Fernandes and Juan Gutiérrez de Padilla, and more. Perfect of Hispanic Heritage Month (Sept 15-Oct 15)!

Baroque_mexican_chapel_small Harmonia devotes itself to the baroque music of Mexico, including works by Gaspar Fernandes and Juan Gutiérrez de Padilla, a brief look at the Jesús Sánchez Garza Collection of Spanish colonial manuscripts, and Lee Santana leads Ensemble Continuo in an unusual take on the guitar music of Santiago de Murcia.

Celebrating Early Music in Latin America

From WFIU | Part of the Harmonia Early Music series | 58:59

We're celebrating early music in Latin America. We'll hear from two composers who were associated with Bogotá Cathedral and explore the origins of the saraband. Plus, The Renaissance Band Piffaro brings us music from the New World in a featured recording.

744-latin-america_charango240_small We're celebrating early music in Latin America on Harmonia. We'll hear from two composers who were associated with Bogotá Cathedral - Herrera and Hidalgo- and explore the origins of the saraband. Plus, The Renaissance Band Piffaro brings us music from the New World in a featured recording.

Hispanic Stories

From Outright Radio | Part of the Outright Radio Series 2004 series | 59:00

Stories of being both gay and Latino in the United States.

Logooutrightradio_small Hispanic Stories ? stories of being both gay and Latino in the US. Jorge (George) Delrio starts the show off as he paddles from Cuba to Florida and talks about the gay encampments in Guantanamo Bay. Javier Reynaldos brings his same-sex date home to meet his Cuban mother. Marta Donayre boards a bus for Washington for the Immigrant Workers Freedom Ride and finally Javier Sanchez reconciles his gay identity with his dual citizenship ? from Mexico.

The Trouble With Black boys

From Smart City Radio | 58:54

Professor Pedro Noguera joins Smart City for a frank discussion about race and achievement based on his book "The Trouble With Black Boys." After, designer and branding expert Thomas Sevcik about turning a city's story into a unique brand.

Default-piece-image-2 This week on Smart City, we explore the stubborn link between race and
poverty in America.   My guest, professor Pedro Noguera, has written a
book about the cultural, societal and personal factors that cause
young black and Hispanic males to run afoul of middle-class American
norms. Professor Noguera joins us to discuss his book "The Trouble
with Black Boys."

And we'll have a discussion with Thomas Sevcik about how much work it
can take to change the way the world views a city.  Thomas is the
founder of the internationally acclaimed creative studio "Arthesia,"
and he'll tell us about the complicated issue of a city's identity and
how to find what he calls "the city's drama."

Epicentro Latino: Spanish and English. Are We a Bilingual Nation? (2 of 4)

From Rebeca Logan | 59:00

This piece looks at the phenomena of the English-only movement and how it has creeped into even such iconic U.S. symbols, such as the national anthem.

Epicentropoliticosmalllogo_small "Hostest With the Mostest": Patricia Guadalupe :48 Report Alex Avila, executive producer of NPR's Latino USA. The piece looks at the phenomena of the English-only movement and how it has creeped into even such iconic U.S. symbols, such as the national anthem. 5:46 Round table with Dan Stein director of the Federal for American Immigration Reform, FAIR, and Pilar Marrero columnist of La Opini?n, the nation's largest-circulating Spanish-language daily newspaper, who talk about the pros and cons of English-only 17:30 break 1 min 18:30 Part Two of Round table Discussion with Dan Stein and Pilar Marrero 30:21 break 1 min 31:21 Report Laura Illiyama, correspondent with Feature Story News, Deutche Welle Radio. This report focuses on the use of racially inflammatory terms, such as "illegal aliens" and their acceptance by the general public. 35:37 Interview with Roland Roebuck, Afro-Latino activist, on the issue of Afro Latinos in the community and how scant attention is paid to them. 41:55 break 1 min 42:55 Interview with noted poet and author Ana Castillo, who talks about the use of language in her writing, and whether writing in both English and Spanish is positive or negative 52:32 break 1 min 53:32 Commentary Ariel Dorfman, who asks, what is wrong with speaking any other language besides English? 59:00

No Rules: The Life & Music of Esteban 'Steve' Jordan

From KUT | 59:00

Music-rich hour-long documentary on Latino accordion legend Esteban 'Steve' Jordan.

Stevejordanwepic_small Esteban 'Steve' Jordan is not a household name. But serious musicians know that for decades Jordan has been considered the world's greatest accordion player. Elusive and reclusive, Jordan was notorious for refusing media interviews. But a recent bout with liver cancer has him lifting the veil on his life story. Latino USA's Alex Avila recently visited with this mysterious musical artist and produced this radio documentary for Hispanic Heritage Month titled, "No Rules: The Life & Music of Esteban 'Steve' Jordan."

Compact Discoveries 129: Arriaga

From Fred Flaxman | Part of the Compact Discoveries series | 57:00

Chances are, no matter how well you know classical music, that you are not familiar with the works of Juan Crisostomo Arriaga.

Cdslogo2inch_small Chances are, no matter how well you know classical music, that you are not familiar with the works of Juan Crisostomo Arriaga. He was a Spanish child prodigy who didn't live long enough to become an adult, but you would never guess that by listening to his string quartets, two of which producer/host Fred Flaxman presents in this hour. Also presented is an overture to an opera Arriaga wrote at the age of 13, before he even had formal lessons in harmony. Complete script with playlist is available here and at www.compactdiscoveries.com.

Discoveries At Wal Disney Concert Hall: Los Lobos

From NPR Music | Part of the Discoveries At Walt Disney Concert Hall series | 59:00

From traditional Mexican and Spanish music, to rock, folk, jazz and even psychedelic sonic experimentation, Los Lobos has successfully redefined their sound, collecting 3 Grammy awards and consistently topping the charts.

Lobos300_small From traditional Mexican and Spanish music, to rock, folk, jazz and even psychedelic sonic experimentation, the East L.A. band Los Lobos has successfully redefined their sound, collecting three Grammy awards and consistently topping the charts. This concert features songs from their latest album, The Town and The City ? with its poignant stories of recent immigrant arrivals ? as well as from their entire career, stretching back to the mid-seventies.


Half-Hour (24:00-30:00)

La Llorona: An Evolving Myth

From Making Contact | Part of the Making Contact series | 29:00

On this edition we hear the story of La Llorona (the weeping woman)-- a story that's been told since the time of the Spanish conquest, all over Mexico and the American Southwest. Today, wherever Mexicans and Mexican-Americans live, the myth continues.

Lloronapicfor4508_small Human beings love to tell stories. And myths are the ultimate in storytelling. A good myth has stood the test of time, and somehow, tens or even hundreds of years later, the story continues to have meaning for those who tell it. La Llorona is one such myth. The story of the weeping woman has been told since the time of the Spanish conquest, all over Mexico and the American Southwest. Today, wherever Mexicans and Mexican-Americans live, the myth continues. In a special collaboration between National Radio Project and the U-C Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism, student producer Beth Hoffman brings us a look at the myth of La Llorona as told in Oakland, California today, and tells how its meaning has grown and changed over time. Featuring: Alicia Diaz, Samuel Martinez, Cecilia Rodriguez, Luz Salazar, Monica Pasqual, Florencia Luna, Cristian Luna. Program #45-08 - Begin date: 10/25/08. End date: 11/13/08. Please call us if you carry us - 510-251-1332 and we will list your station on our website. If you excerpt, please credit early and often.

Sandra Cisneros, Latina author of the classic "The House on Mango Street"

From New Letters on the Air | 29:00

Sandra Cisneros, author of the now-classic novel THE HOUSE ON MANGO STREET, reflects on the 25th anniversary of the book's publication, as well as her growth as a fiction writer, essayist and poet. She also reads from LOOSE WOMAN and CARAMELLO.

Lifebookcisneros1ft_small For Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15- October 15), Latina author Sandra Cisneros discusses her groundbreaking classic novel, The House on Mango Street, which was released in a special 25th anniversary edition in 2009 with a new forward essay by Cisneros. The founder of the Macondo Foundation to foster creativity among socially-engaged writers, Cisneros talks about her own growth as a writer of fiction, essays and poetry, and reads from this early work as well as from her more recent novel, Caramello, and her poetry collection, Loose Woman.

What's the Word? Puerto Rican Literature on the Island and in the United States

From Modern Language Association | 29:45

This program explores the conflicts between traditional Hispanic and Afro-Antillean culture and the increasing influence of the United States on island culture.

Wtwprflag_small What's the Word? Puerto Rican Literature on the Island and in the United States Puerto Rico became a territory of the United States at the beginning of the twentieth century. Since then, issues of national and cultural identity have been central to Puerto Rican literature. This program explores the conflicts between traditional Hispanic and Afro-Antillean culture and the increasing influence of the United States on island culture. Writers who left the island to live elsewhere provide other perspectives on Puerto Rican cultural identity. On this program Guillermo Irizarry discusses works by Antonio S. Pedreira, Jose Luis Gonzalez, and Mayra Santos Febres; Licia Fiol-Matta explores the life and work of the poet Julia de Burgos; and Lazarro Lima takes us back to the founding of the Nuyorican Poet's Cafe by poets Miguel Algarin and Miguel Pinero. Fifteen- and thirty-second promos available. Well-suited to National Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15 - October 15) If you are interested in this, see our piece at: http://prx.org/pieces/27700 What's the Word? Cosmopolitanism in Latin America.

Domestic Violence in the Hispanic Community

From Voces de Nuestro Mundo | 27:41

The number of domestic violence cases are growing fastest in the Hispanic community.

023_small

The numbers of Domestic Violence Cases are growing faster in the Hispanic community. This show is full of answers to this situation. We interviewed Maria Pabon who is the Director of Casa de Esperanza who works with victims of domestic Violence. We also had the opportunity to talk with a victim of domestic violence who opened her heart to talk about this terrible reality.      

A Country for All: An Immigrant Manifesto

From Voces de Nuestro Mundo | 28:00

Journalist and author Jorge Ramos talks about his latest book "Tierra de Todos" and explain why it is necessary to reform the immigration system now.

Jorge_ramos_small

“Tierra de Todos” is the title of Jorge Ramos new book.  The renowned journalist and anchor for the Hispanic network Univision talks about his latest book and the critical situation of millions of undocumented immigrants in the U.S.  This is one of those great shows that Voces de Nuestro Mundo is proud to present.

Understanding the Islam

From Voces de Nuestro Mundo | 27:53

Explore what it is like to be a Latino Muslim.

024_small In an effort to learn and understand more about a religion which many Hispanics has misconceptions of, Voces de Nuestro Mundo brings a show on Islam. It is a very rich show full of diversity and culture. We had the opportunity to interview Jaime Fletcher who is the Director and Co-founder of Islam in Spanish. We also interviewed Safia Manjra who told us her personal experience with the Islam as a Muslim Latino woman.     

What's the Word? Cosmopolitanism in Latin America

From Modern Language Association | 29:45

During the early and mid-twentieth century, many Latin American writers engaged with international literary and cultural movements.

Wtwprflag_small What's the Word? Cosmopolitanism in Latin America During the early and mid-twentieth century, many Latin American writers engaged with international literary and cultural movements. This bridge building, as some called it, enriched the literary scene in Latin America, but it also raised questions about the definition of national identity. On this program Cesar Salgado talks about the Cuban journal _Origenes_; John King discusses the Argentine journal _Sur_; and Estelle Tarica talks about Peruvian writer Jose Carlos Mariategui. Fifteen- and thirty-second promos available. Well-suited to National Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15 - October 15) If you are interested in this, see our piece at: http://prx.org/pieces/27702 What's the Word? Puerto Rican Literature on the Island and in the United States.


Cutaways (5:00-8:59)

Living in Limbo

From Seattle Globalist | Part of the Between Worlds/Behind Bars series | 08:32

In our final segment, producer Jessica Partnow follows the story of one family living in immigration limbo in Auburn, Washington.

Gabi_small When we think of deportation we might picture a one–time event. You get caught, they put you on a plane, and that's it. But a deportation order can take months or even years to process. For the final segment in our "Between Worlds/Behind Bars" series we look at the story of one family living in deportation limbo.

Following in Darwin's Footsteps: Two Young Women Scientists Forge Their Futures in the Galapagos

From Veronique LaCapra | 06:34

What motivates young people to become scientists? Meet Maricruz Jaramillo and Samoa Asigau, two young women scientists from opposite sides of the Pacific Ocean, whose professional aspirations have taken them to the Galapagos Islands.

Science reporter Véronique LaCapra joined Mari and Samoa in the Galapagos, where they are studying a type of malaria that is affecting native bird populations there.

"Following in Darwin’s Footsteps" profiles their research and personal journeys into science, and highlight the changing face of scientific research. The Galapagos Islands — Charles Darwin’s inspiration and a touchstone in the history of evolutionary biology — serve as a sound-rich backdrop.

Mari_and_samoa_prx_img_2197_small What motivates young people to become scientists? Meet Maricruz Jaramillo and Samoa Asigau, two young women scientists from opposite sides of the Pacific Ocean, whose professional aspirations have taken them to the Galapagos Islands. Science reporter Véronique LaCapra joined Mari and Samoa in the Galapagos, where they are studying a type of malaria that is affecting native bird populations there. "Following in Darwin’s Footsteps" profiles their research and personal journeys into science, and highlights the changing face of scientific research. The Galapagos Islands — Charles Darwin’s inspiration and a touchstone in the history of evolutionary biology — serve as a sound-rich backdrop.

Who Belongs Here?

From Emily Corwin | 05:50

On January 21st 2011, a newspaper in the Boston neighborhood of Jamaica Plain broke the story. The 47-year old Hi Lo Hispanic grocery store would be closing, and a Whole Foods Market would be moving in. The news was polarizing.

City councilors spoke at town meetings, alliances formed, and one thing became clear. Gentrification pits against each other two conflicting values, both at the heart of the American identity.

Prxsmall_small On January 21st 2011, a newspaper in the Boston neighborhood of Jamaica Plain broke the story.  The 47-year old Hi Lo Hispanic grocery store would be closing, and a Whole Foods Market would be moving in.  The news was polarizing.

City councilors spoke at town meetings, alliances formed, and one thing became clear.  Gentrification pits against each other two conflicting values, both at the heart of the American identity.

This story was featured by State of the Re:Union as a slideshow, with photos by Kelly Creedon.

Blending of cultures may be blueprint for growth

From Harvest Public Media Group | Part of the Farmer of the Future series | 05:26

While some of the rural Midwest is hollowing out, regions like Sioux County, Iowa, are actually growing, thanks largely to immigrant populations moving in to take jobs that employers otherwise cannot fill. Melding cultures is never easy, but in communities like Sioux County, Latinos are slowly making the Midwest their home.

2012_dairy_farm_045_small

Who is the farmer of the future?

That’s the question being posed by Harvest Public Media in a weeklong series that explores how demographic, technological and cultural forces will shape America’s food producers into the next decade and beyond.

We begin with a story from Kathleen Masterson, who reports that while much of the rural Midwest is hollowing out – some small regions are actually GROWING, largely due to immigration populations taking ag-related jobs that otherwise employers cannot fill. Melding cultures is never easy, but in communities like Sioux County, Iowa… there's a mutual reliance… and slowly members of the Latino community are changing the landscape of the rural Midwest.

Full Story:

Who is the farmer of the future?

That’s the question being posed by Harvest Public Media in a weeklong series that explores how demographic, technological and cultural forces will shape America’s food producers into the next decade and beyond.

We begin with a story from Kathleen Masterson, who reports that while much of the rural Midwest is hollowing out – some small regions are actually GROWING, largely due to immigration populations taking ag-related jobs that otherwise employers cannot fill. Melding cultures is never easy, but in communities like Sioux County, Iowa… there's a mutual reliance… and slowly members of the Latino community are changing the landscape of the rural Midwest.

OPEN---

This corner of northwest Iowa is known for its Dutch pastries; the landscape is dotted with Lutheran and reform churches. But now, Catholic churches and tortillerias are creeping into the landscape … signs of the new residents joining this vibrant community.

Terry van Maanen runs Winding Meadows dairy in Sioux County Iowa. He bought the family farm from his father in the 80s. His farm itself is indicative of how much the region has changed in the last few decades:

Windingmeadows-dairy-SCENE (10) :

MEX MUSIC… Km: is this the end of shift? Martin: Me no speak English -- TVM: check your spanish out talking to Martin...

The workers are cleaning out the milking parlor before bringing in the next batch of cows. Van Maanen explains the 600-cow operation runs 24 hours a day, every day of the week-- even on Christmas .

Vanmannen2 (06)-- I mean you get people apply for a job here, and 'Oh, weekends and nights?' -- oh, no, not interested…

Van Maanen says about TWO THIRDS (7/11) of his workers are Latino.

Vanmaanen1 (19) : I honestly think I could not run my business if all these, the guys that are working for me, were to leave and I had to fill them with non-Hispanic help. I think I'd have to close the door. (laughs) It would be tough.

Some of Van Maanen's staff, Anglo and Latino, have been with him over 10 years. He says everyone gets along well in the workplace, even though not all employees speak English.

But when it comes to mixing outside of work -- Van Maanen says the Anglo and Latino cultures have been slower to SOCIALIZE. (17)

Vanmaanen3 (13) -- The schools, I think, kinda brings everybody together, when their families have kids that go to the community school, I think it gives us a common entity to circle around.

Latino children make up about 20 percent of the classrooms in Sioux Center and nearby towns. Overall, the town’s population has grown 17 percent -- and the county is up 7 percent over the last decade. Meanwhile most of rural Iowa is LOSING people…91 of Iowa’s 99 counties have declined by about 9 percent over the last three decades.

So it's not just about labor -- if Sioux County is any indication -- for some Midwestern communities, immigrant populations could be an important part of keeping rural culture alive.

Back in the milking parlor at Winding Meadows Dairy, there's the whirring of the giant pumps moving milk out to stainless steel tank (NAT SOUND)

Luis Campos , the parlor manager, says he came to the US illegally but he married a US citizen and got his papers. Still it took him a while to adjust to Iowa:

Luis2 (21)- At first, yeah it's too hard for me. Especially when I was single, but now I got a kids-- my kids now they like here. They born here. In America. The schools in here is better, you know, everything is better here.

When I asked if felt comfortable in the culture, Campos said now he considers himself: (04)

Luis2b (08): I am, most, maybe half and half. Half mine and half like you guys.

As far as community involvement -- Campos is really involved. But mostly in the Latino community: he leads the Mexican totonaca dancing at a local catholic church, and teaches Sunday school to kindergarteners.

Enrique Luevano also really likes living in Iowa. Originally from Mexico, he's lived here for 15 years now, and worked his way up to a supervisor at the pork processing plant Natural Food Holdings. He says Latino and Anglo cultures are still fairly separate.

Enrique2 (15) -- We respect each other, that's what is nice about here, you don't hear about people fighting because of the color of their skin. Here everybody minds their own business, and away we go.

Luevano is now a legal resident. BUT MANY others LIVE IN constant fear, community advocates say. They've established families and lives here, but if they're pulled over coming back from the grocery store, they could be deported within days.

Still there are signs Latinos are making a home here. There are bilingual churches, local volunteers teach English night classes, and law enforcement has had training on working in a diverse community.

And these new residents are an important part of the community -- and its future, says Gary Malenke, the president of the Natural Food Holdings pork processing plant.

Gary 1 (12): Misconception I think that people have is that, I think people believe that oh, these immigrants are stealing all these jobs-- we don't see that here, ok, we just don't.

Malenke says there's a real need for laborers --in dairies, hog confinements, poultry farms and general construction, too.

Not only are immigrants helping buoy the farm economy, but their children are American citizens -- they're part of church communities and schools and sports teams.

Malenke2 (19)-- There's a lot of progress in these communities, I mean in Sioux Center they're going to build a hospital, a $48 million dollar hospital, not just a hospital. And that's the kind of things that are happening in these communities, which, face it, that tells you that businesses are doing well.

And when communities do well – it gives everybody options. The kids of these immigrant workers – just like other rural kids in the Midwest, are not all going into farm work. Some want to be doctors, teachers and business owners. And just like generations before -- because of their parents' hard work, they'll have that opportunity.

I'm Kathleen Masterson, HPM.

The Girl From Empanada

From Robynn Takayama | 05:07

Street food is hot! But why are entrepreneurs turning to this option? For the owner of Chile Lindo, an empanada storefront, the answer is simple: it generates cash flow.

0091_small The 2009 Recovery Act includes $30 million for expanding the Small Business Administration’s Microloan program. These loans of less than $35,000 put money into the hands of small business owners who stimulate the economy by spending money in their communities.

Entrepreneur, Paula Tejeda could benefit from one of these microloans. She says the biggest challenge to launching her business selling Chilean empanadas is a lack of cash.

But these pocket-sized, meat pastries are the perfect food to sell to people on-the-go, so Paula has been taking them out to the streets.

 


Drop-Ins (2:00-4:59)

Hispanic or Latino?

From New Visions, New Voices | Part of the Experience Hispanic Heritage series | 03:29

Hispanics are the largest and fastest growing minority group in the country. Though many are recent immigrants, Hispanics have been living in America as far back as the 16th century, even before settlers from England. But where did the terms “Hispanic” and “Latino” come from? Ramona Martinez sheds some light on the subject.

Latin-americanflags_small

Hispanics are the largest and fastest growing minority group in the country. Though many are recent immigrants, Hispanics have been living in America as far back as the 16th century, even before settlers from England. But where did the terms “Hispanic” and “Latino” come from? Ramona Martinez sheds some light on the subject.

Experience Hispanic Heritage (Series)

Produced by New Visions, New Voices

Latinos are the largest and fastest growing minority group in the country. Though many are recent immigrants, Hispanics have been living in America as far back as the 16th century, even before settlers from England. How has the the American narrative been shaped by Latinos, and how will they continue to shape it? We bring you stories of the Hispanic/Latino American experience, past, present, and future.

Most recent piece in this series:

Grace Flores-Hughes: A Tale of Survival

From New Visions, New Voices | Part of the Experience Hispanic Heritage series | 06:59

Grace_flores-hughes_small In the 1950s, Taft, Texas was a segregated cotton town with a sizeable Mexican-American population, all of whom lived on the South Side of the railroad tracks. It was in a part of the state had a history of Anglo on Mexican violence, including police brutality and lynchings. Ramona Martinez spoke to one woman was born and raised in Taft, Texas, a place where success and upward mobility were not often seen her in community.

An Immigrant's Perspective

From Robynn Takayama | 04:40

This story explores what life is like in the US working without papers.

Default-piece-image-2 Over 12 million immigrants in the United States are out of status according to the Pew Hispanic Center and 75% of undocumented workers make their living in the formal economy. But as ICE cracks down with their immigration raids, more and more workers are forced into the informal economy like being a day laborer. This profile on Catalina (a pseudonym) offers a human face to the immigration debate. Catalina could not make a living in Mexico even though her family owned land. After suffering an injury at a garment factory, she turned to domestic work. The Mexican family she worked for was moving to the United States and offered her a work visa if she made a year commitment. Once in the US, she thought she could learn English and gain skills that could help her find better work on her return home. Instead, she says she was kept from leaving the house and the family illegally forced her to work 7 days a week. After a year this exploitation Catalina left the family but stayed in the US. Eventually, she found La Raza Centro Legal and joined the Women's Collective, a worker-run group that solicits domestic work from San Francisco's wealthier neighborhoods. She is learning English and labor rights. She's also running a self esteem workshop for her peers. Even through all this hardship, she never thought it's be better to stay in Mexico and she wants people to know that she's just in the US to try to survive.

"Proofs" read by author Richard Rodriguez

From Amy Wallen | Part of the DimeStories series | 04:26

A story told from the perspectives of both a young boy when the time for crossing the border from Mexico to the US is imminent, and the adult on the US side as a journalist photographing the illegal immigrants.

Proofs_small A story told from the perspectives of both a young boy when the time for crossing the border from Mexico to the US is imminent, and the adult on the US side as a journalist photographing the illegal immigrants.  

Jincho

From WAMU | 03:22

When Josue arrived in the US he was surprised to find that some of the Latino students in his school weren't as welcoming as he thought they'd be.

Playing
Jincho
From
WAMU

Yvlogo_small A report released last month by the Census Bureau reveals that Hispanics accounted for almost half of the country’s population growth over the last four years. And for the first time, that growth has more to do with children being born here than with new immigrants coming into the country. Youth Voices reporter Josue Melgar is himself a fairly recent arrival from El Salvador. He says the distinction between these first and second generation Latino immigrants is more obvious than people might think.

Immigration Law Affects Oklahoma City Hispanic Community

From Scott Gurian | 04:16

Business owners in OKC's Hispanic neighborhood describe the impact of strict, new measures cracking down on illegal immigration.

02_small For several decades, immigrants from Latin America have been lured to the Oklahoma City area by construction and service industry jobs as well as the cheap cost of living. But recently, things have been a little quieter than they used to be in the Hispanic neighborhood of Capitol Hill. That?s because of House Bill 1804, a new, anti-illegal immigration law that went into effect in Oklahoma last November. It makes it a felony for anyone to transport, conceal or house undocumented immigrants, and people on both sides of the issue have called it one of the strictest measures of its type in the country. The law is still fairly new, so there aren?t yet many hard statistics about its effects. But anecdotal evidence suggests it?s already had an enormous impact. Randy King, the Publisher of the Spanish language newspaper El Nacional (http://www.elnacionalnews.com), gives us a walking tour of Capitol Hill and introduces us to several business owners including Elias Pando of Tortilleria Lupita; Max Gaona, who runs the Mexican sports bar and chicken restaurant Maxpollo and Kay Garner, owner of Budget Foods.

Adel

From Y-Press | Part of the youth and police series | 02:06

A Hispanic Indianapolis teen talks about his views on police and their role in his community.

Playing
Adel
From
Y-Press

Adel_againq_small

Y-Press reporter Katie Bolinger has a candid discussion with Adel Marte, a Hispanic Indianapolis teen, about his feelings on police and their relationship with his community.

What does "Latino" and "Hispanic" really mean?

From Andrew Reissiger | 04:14

There's so much diversity in the Americas. What does the term "Latino" or "Hispanic" really mean?

Streetmusicians_small With so much cultural input in Latin America ... African, Spanish, Amerindian, Portuguese, French, and these days from the United States.....what does it mean to be Latino or Hispanic? Is there really anything in common that all Latinos have? What about the music? What is Latin Music?

The Latino Gap: Not Quite Trilingual

From The National Center for Media Engagement | Part of the American Graduate series | 04:01

California, Arizona, and Massachusetts have all replaced bilingual education with an English immersion model. This was supposed to help close the achievement gap. But by most measures, it hasn't. In the finale of our series, we follow one student through five years of English-only classes and find that she's still struggling to communicate, in any language.

American_graduate_2_a_small California, Arizona, and Massachusetts have all replaced bilingual education with an English immersion model. This was supposed to help close the achievement gap. But by most measures, it hasn't. In the finale of our series, we follow one student through five years of English-only classes and find that she's still struggling to communicate, in any language.

Las Hermanitas Garza

From Stories from Deep in the Heart, a project of Texas Folklife | 03:37

The story of one family and many generations of women in Conjunto music. Produced by Stories Summer Institute youth reporters Arlette Flores, Jennifer Gonzales, Roberto Hernandez, and Steven Ugalde, in conjunction with the Austin Music Map, Localore, and KUT 90.5.

Listening_partyexport The story of one family and many generations of women in Conjunto music. Produced by Stories Summer Institute youth reporters Arlette Flores, Jennifer Gonzales, Roberto Hernandez, and Steven Ugalde, in conjunction with the Austin Music Map, Localore, and KUT 90.5.

2012: End of the World! Cancun, Mexico

From Jake Warga | 04:06

It's the end of the world, according to the Mayan Calendar. A thoughtful and goofy piece exploring Cancun, Mexico.

Warga_cancun_03_small It's the end of the world, according to the Mayan Calendar. A thoughtful and goofy piece exploring Cancun, Mexico.


Interstitials (Under 2:00)

Hispanic Heritage Month (Series)

Produced by Cesar Chavez Foundation

The Cesar Chávez Foundation Celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month

Most recent piece in this series:

Hispanic Heritage Month 2013

From Cesar Chavez Foundation | Part of the Hispanic Heritage Month series | :59

Hispanic_heritage_month_2013_prx_tilte_4_small

María Elena Salinas nació en Los Ángeles, hija de padres inmigrantes mexicanos y es una de las mejor reconocidas periodistas Latinas en Los Estados Unidos.

Ha entrevistado influyentes líderes como los presidentes Fox, Carter, Clinton y Obama, y en mil novecientos noventa y nueve recibió el premio Ammy por noticias y documental. Es confundadora de la Asociación Nacional de Periodistas Hispanos y por medio de “María Elena Salinas Scholarship” apoya a estudiantes Latinos interesados en el periodismo. María Elena Salinas es nuestro orgullo hispano.