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Playlist: Guns, Rights, Mental Health

Compiled By: PRX Editors

 Credit: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/skrubu/">pni</a>
Image by: pni 
Curated Playlist

In light of recent and ongoing gun violence, we suggest some context around grief, guns, mental disorders, and peace.

Strangers (podcast): "The Long Shadow"

From Lea Thau | Part of the Strangers series | 35:36

A gun death in 1997 changes the fate of two bandmates.

The_long_shadow_small On this episode of Strangers... an episode about the randomness of fate and how life changes in an instant at the hand of a stranger. A controversial event in 1997 changed the lives of two band mates and their friends. This is their story -- with Seth Goldsamt, Matt Gross, Jakob Gurevitch, Ben Mintz, and Jane Burmeister.

Owning Guns

From WGBH Radio Boston | 05:56

Writer Jay Allison talks about the events in his life that cause him to rethink his relationship with guns.

586nickelr2_small Aired on ATC on 7-16-04 In this short "illustrated essay" for radio, writer/producer Jay Allison considers his history with guns and his attraction to them, as a man and as an American. In considering a handgun purchase, he touches on childhood memories, political correctness, responsibilities of fatherhood, myths of manliness, impotence against terrorism, the isolation of divorce, the complexity of patriotism, and Frank Sinatra. No liberal or conservative stand is taken in this piece. It is deliberately ambivalent.

This School Year, a Commitment to Mental Health

From Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) | Part of the Substance Abuse & Mental Illness: The Impact on America’s Communities series | 05:23

High school teacher Joe Vulopas has a conversation with his son J.J., a recent high school graduate, about the academic and social pressures young people face today and their work together creating positive mental health environments in schools across the nation.

Vulopas1_small Following the tragic death of high school sophomore Phil Cardin in 2004, English teacher Joe Vulopas worked with students to form Aevidum, a community-based program with the mission of creating positive mental health environments for students. In this segment, Joe has a conversation with his son, J.J., about the day Phil took his life, the academic and social pressures young people face today and how Aevidum creates cultures of mental health advocacy in schools across the nation. David Wilson of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) lends his expertise to the discussion.

Out of the Shadows: A son's mental illness divides a family

From WBEZ | Part of the Out of the Shadows series | 07:38

How a child's mental illness forces a family to celebrate birthdays and take vacations separately in order to stay together. Part of the 12-piece Out of the Shadows series on mental illness in youth.

Brain-anatomy_small How a child's mental illness forces a family to celebrate birthdays and take vacations separately in order to stay together.

Guns, Mental Illness and Addiction

From Tim Lineaweaver | 03:55

Tim Lineaweaver, a psychotherapist from Massachusetts, reflects on a painful personal history, and what it has taken him to confront and overcome violence.

NB: The content of this essay is intense - addressing subjects of a sensitive nature.

Gun_bed_small Tim Lineaweaver, a psychotherapist from Massachusetts, reflects on a painful personal history, and what it has taken him to confront and overcome violence.  Lineaweaver counsels clients suffering from addictions and trauma. 

Out of the Shadows: A family's struggle to find normalcy for their mentally ill child

From WBEZ | Part of the Out of the Shadows series | 12:13

A family reshapes itself to accommodate their mentally ill son. Part of the 12-part Out of the Shadows series on mental illness in youth.

Kids_small A family reshapes itself to accommodate their mentally ill son.

Out of the Shadows: The tricky transition to adulthood

From WBEZ | Part of the Out of the Shadows series | 09:23

People between the ages of 18 and 25 are the most likely of any age group to experience mental illness. They’re also the least likely age group to get adequate services, and often have difficulty navigating the complex transformation into adulthood known as “the transition cliff.” Part of the 12-piece Out of the Shadows series on mental illness in youth.

Ana_thresholds_final_small People between the ages of 18 and 25 are the most likely of any age group to experience mental illness. They’re also the least likely age group to get adequate services, and often have difficulty navigating the complex transformation into adulthood known as “the transition cliff.”

Peace Talks Radio: Teaching Peace In Schools (58:00 / 54:00)

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 57:10

An inspiring story of a man who turned his grief over his slain son into action to teach nonviolence to school kids. Plus other efforts to teach peace in Washington, DC and Seattle, WA.

Colmanmccarthy2_small In his more recent public appearances, Tibetan Leader, the Dalai Lama, has been targeting his peace and compassion message to young people. To him, teaching compassion and peace to our young is the best hope for peace in the future. A look at efforts to teach peace in the schools, this time on Peace Talks Radio. First, a visit with Azim Khamisa, director of the Tariq Khamisa Foundation, a non-profit organization that takes programs on nonviolence and forgiveness into schools. The foundation memorializes Mr. Khamisa's son Tariq, who was delivering pizzas in San Diego in January 1995 when he was shot and killed by a 14-year-old gang member who had been challenged to prove himself to his gang by firing a gun into Tariq's car. Mr. Khamisa joined with Ples Felix, the grandfather and guardian of the shooter, to create the foundation and develop the school programs. Also on the program, a journalist-turned-teacher who has been on a one man crusade to bring peace curriculum to schools in the Washington, DC area. From 1969 to 1997, Colman McCarthy (pictured above) wrote columns for the Washington Post. In his years as a columnist and journalist, he had the opportunity to interview Nobel Peace Prize winners and other figures that, he says, inspired him, in 1982, to begin teaching courses courses on nonviolence and the literature of peace in high schools and universities in the DC area. In 25 years, he has taught more than 7,000 students in his classes. McCarthy has edited two books for use in Peace Studies classes and in 1985, he founded the Center for Teaching Peace, a nonprofit that helps schools begin or expand academic programs in Peace Studies. Finally we go to Seattle, Washington where teacher Lori Markowitz manages an organization called "Bridges To Understanding." She oversees programs in some Seattle schools that promote global understanding and compassion to students. "Bridges to Understanding" has Seattle school kids connecting with kids in Thailand or South Africa, swapping stories and pictures over the internet. Some get to connect live and in person when they visit the U.S. We talked with both Lori Markowitz and Teleia Thurman, a student who participated in one of the programs. Our host is Carol Boss. "Kids are our future leaders. If we can teach them, now, that from conflict you create your brother or sister, you create love and unity - if you apply the principles of nonviolent peace making and forgiveness - maybe,someday, we'll have world peace." -Azim Khamisa, Founder of the Tariq Khamisa Foundation "Each of us in our hearts, is yearning for peace. All governments claim they want peace. So, I began to wonder. If that's the case, why aren't we teaching ourselves how to go about it? I wanted to see if that could be taught, whether it could be learned and whether students would be receptive to it." -Colman McCarthy, Founder of the Center for Teaching Peace This content is also available in two discrete half-hour programs also on PRX: PART ONE - http://www.prx.org/pieces/23240 PART TWO - http://www.prx.org/pieces/23241

Strong-armed

From Neena Pathak | 07:31

The National Rifle Association started its Women on Target program in 2000. According to their website, they’ve trained over eighty thousand women in the program on the basics of gun handling and safety. And participation in the program has increased 26% in 2012. On Cape Cod, two dozen women recently took the class, but they don’t always see eye-to-eye with the NRA on the issues surrounding gun ownership. Neena Pathak reports from Eastham.

Playing
Strong-armed
From
Neena Pathak

Keelyahlstrom1_small The National Rifle Association started its Women on Target program in 2000. According to their website, they’ve trained over eighty thousand women in the program on the basics of gun handling and safety. And participation in the program has increased 26% in 2012. On Cape Cod, two dozen women recently took the class, but they don’t always see eye-to-eye with the NRA on the issues surrounding gun ownership. Neena Pathak reports from Eastham. *This piece was produced as part of Transom.org's Story Workshop. (http://transom.org/workshop/story-workshop/)

Guns at Home

From Y-Press | Part of the Youth and legal uses of guns series | 03:31

Last month In Florida, 17-year-old Thorin Montgomery and three friends were playing Russian Roulette with a .38 caliber revolver on his back porch. Montgomery had his turn, and shot himself in the head. But not every kid who has access to guns at home uses them recklessly.

Playing
Guns at Home
From
Y-Press

Sam_thumb_small Last month In Florida, 17-year-old Thorin Montgomery and three friends were playing Russian Roulette with a .38 caliber revolver on his back porch. Montgomery had his turn, and shot himself in the head. But not every kid who has access to guns at home uses them recklessly. Keenen Brannon, 18, spoke with three Indiana youth whose parents have instructed them in how to use guns at home, for protection.  

Global Ethics Corner: Do Stricter Gun Controls Reduce Gun-Related Violence?

From Carnegie Council | Part of the Global Ethics Corner series | 02:00

The gun control debate in the United States has been revived in the wake of the Aurora massacre. With thousands of firearm-related homicides each year in the U.S., should it be harder to buy a gun? Or is gun ownership a core liberty that defines the American way of life?

Globalethicscorner_logo1_small

Global Ethics Corner is a weekly 2 minute segment devoted to newsworthy ethical issues. It presents both sides of an issue, asking viewers to weigh the information and make up their own minds.

"Cañon" by Alberto Che Guevara

From WBEZ | Part of the Louder Than a Bomb 2005 series | 01:45

In this poem a young Chicago author tells us about the power of the gun.

Ltablogo_small Louder Than a Bomb brings you the 2005 finalists from this nationally-renowned teen poetry slam, hosted by Young Chicago Authors. Featuring remarkable work about identity, race relations, gun violence, police brutality, relationships with parents, God, Islam, cancer, HIV/AIDS, and gentrification these young writers hold very little back. Each piece included in the series is a titled performance piece. Without introduction, a template for host-introduction is offered here (under additional materials). These pieces would work well aired independently or as a series in locally produced programming that is looking to add a youth perspective. This is debut series. The Young Chicago Authors - Louder Than a Bomb teen poetry slam is now in it’s fifth year, bringing poets ages 13-19 years-old together in a safe space that emphasizes community building, education, and youth empowerment. By carrying on the rich tradition of oral storytelling and the spoken word, the 2005 Louder Than a Bomb teen poetry slam engaged over 400 youth participants representing over 30 schools and community organizations. The eight teams that were invited to the final round, each presenting one group piece and two individual pieces, are presented here. Louder Than a Bomb is produced by Breeze Luetke-Stahlman and distributed directly to public radio stations through PRX.

2012: A Year In Your Ear - "Someone's Screaming Outside"

From Mad Genius | Part of the 2012: A Year In Your Ear series | 03:31

Mad Genius tells the story of another shooting from this year, that of Trayvon Martin in Florida, using only sounds from YouTube and news clips.

Mad_genius_pic_small

NEW!  Watch the "music video" (and we use that term loosely) at our series page or at YouTube under MadGeniusBlog.

While working on its debut album, the anonymous vérité pop collective Mad Genius decided to follow the real money with this foray into public broadcasting.

Keeping with what we do best, we're sampling the world's news and audio culture (both professional and amateur) in an effort to tell stories in a way that would make Ira either cry in pain or throw fits of furious envy. Maybe both, come to think of it. We're taking the talking heads and turning them into pop stars, making music with the media and nothing more. The goal is to create an hour-long musical time capsule by the end of the year. That is, of course, unless the apocalypse comes first.

Here's our latest episode. We're calling it "Someone's Screaming Outside." Trayvon Martin, George Zimmerman, one gunshot and our attempt at telling their complex story using only YouTube reaction to the situation. Should clear up all remaining questions, right?

As we write this, we're developing our next track. A little Columbian samba that takes on the Secret Service. Our question for you: Should we be scared? Will M.I.B.'s visit our studio at Mad Manor? Stay tuned...

Working for Peace after Gun Violence (Peace Talks Radio) [59:00 / 54:00]

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 58:58

We talk to three people who, when affected directly or indirectly by gun violence, have channeled their pain and upset into efforts to address the gun violence and neighborhood safety issues in their own way. Guests include a survivor of the 2007 Virginia Tech mass shooting, a mother whose son was a victim of street violence in Chicago in 2007, and an Albuquerque father of two who was moved to act when hearing of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shootings 2000 miles away in Connecticut.

Gunbuyback3_small

This time on Peace Talks Radio ...  If random gun violence were to personally shatter your world… how would you respond?    Could you turn your personal upset, grief or fear into action…action that might help preserve the peace and make a difference in reducing violence in our communities?   What if the violence didn’t personally affect you but merely the news of some violence shocked you, as it does many of us?  Could you be moved to meaningful action?

Today on our program, we’ll hear the stories of three people .  One, Colin Goddard, the survivor of the mass shooting in 2007 at Virginia Tech where 32 were killed by a disgruntled highly armed student.  After 2 years of healing, he joined national efforts to promote mandatory background checks on gun sales.

Second, we’ll talk with Annette Nance-Holt, the mother of an innocent 16 year old boy who was shot and killed on a Chicago city bus.  She's helped start an organization called "Purpose Over Pain" that assists other families who've lost children to street violence as well as addresses some of the root causes of gang violence.

And third, we’ll meet Scott Cameron, an Albuquerque father of two boys.  When he heard of the mass shooting at the Sandy Hook Elementary school in CT in 2012, although he was 2,000 miles away,   he began to organize in his own community, setting up events he thought  might reduce the chances of a Sandy Hook happening in his city.

Guns and Suicide: The Hidden Toll (Feature)

From With Good Reason | 02:27

The gun control debate often centers around homicides and the fear of someone else with a gun. However, attention is rarely paid to the link between gun ownership and suicides. Allison Quantz reports on a new study that says more guns equal more suicides.

Houston_gun_show_at_the_george_r The gun control debate often centers around homicides and the fear of someone else with a gun. However, attention is rarely paid to the link between gun ownership and suicides. Allison Quantz reports on a new study that says more guns equal more suicides.

Teens and Guns: Illegal Uses (Series)

Produced by Y-Press

On New Year’s Eve in 2011, a Y-Press journalist lost her cousin to a fatal gunshot wound on Indianapolis’ near Northside.

At a storyboard, she came to her peers with a question: How easy is it for teens in Indianapolis to get access to guns?

Most recent piece in this series:

Victims

From Y-Press | Part of the Teens and Guns: Illegal Uses series | 04:18

Playing
Victims
From
Y-Press

Juard_small The emergency room at Indianapolis' Wishard Hospital sees its fair share of gun shot victims, both teenagers and adults. Y-Press visited Wishard to learn about programs for victims that aim to prevent them from ending up in the E.R. a second time. Elizabeth Papandria, 13, has this report.

Idiots With Guns

From The Final Edition Radio Hour | Part of the Singles from The Final Edition Radio Hour series | 01:32

A Paid Political Message from Idiots With Guns

Idiots_small Idiots With Guns stands up for the un-stood up for... the irresponsible gun owners who need protection from themselves. 

Mumsy's Grief

From Canadian Broadcasting Corporation | Part of the CBC Radio's Outfront series | 08:45

Elsaida Douglas deals with the shooting death of her son.

Prxoutfrontplain_small Mumsy's Grief Elsaida Douglas Producer: Carma Jolly Three years ago, Elsaida Douglas woke up with a strange feeling that something was wrong. She lives in Regent Park in Toronto. Regent Park is Canada's oldest and largest social housing project. It's a neighbourhood where society's problems are intensified. The people who live there deal with gangs, drugs, and shootings on a regular basis. On that day in May of 2001, Elsaida came face to face with those problems in the worst possible way. Broadcast on CBC Radio One's Outfront: February 25, 2004 February 16, 2005 SEE ADDITIONAL LICENSE TERMS Outfront Opening and Closing Theme available - (see Rundown section for more details)

2012: A Year In Your Ear - "The Police Made Them Hold Hands And Close Their Eyes"

From Mad Genius | Part of the 2012: A Year In Your Ear series | 04:18

Chardon, Oikos, Aurora, the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin, Sandy Hook. 2012 was the year of the mass shooting. Mad Genius once again steals sound from the news cycle to remix this story into a song. A simple moment to think, built with sound from one witness and ambience left in the wake of all these shootings.

G-cvr-121214-school-shooting-1030a_photoblog600_small Your apocalypse! Remixed! While working on its debut album, the anonymous vérité pop collective Mad Genius decided to follow the real money with this foray into public broadcasting: "2012: A Year In Your Ear." Keeping with what we do best, we're sampling the world's news and audio culture (both professional and amateur) in an effort to tell stories in a way that would make Ira either cry in pain or throw fits of furious envy. Maybe both, come to think of it. We're taking the talking heads and turning them into pop stars, making music with the media and nothing more. The goal is to create an hour-long musical time capsule by the end of the year. That is, of course, unless the end of days comes first. Mad Genius presents the latest story-song in our "2012: A Year In Your Ear" series: "The Police Made Them Hold Hands And Close Their Eyes." Chardon, Oikos, Aurora, the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin, Sandy Hook. We'll probably remember this year for other moments, but let's face this harsh fact: 2012 was the year of the mass shooting. Mad Genius once again steals sound from the news cycle to remix this story into a song. However, this time, a slightly different approach. The talking heads are out in force on this issue, so we'd like to present something more abstract. A simple moment to think, built with sound from one witness and ambience left in the wake of all these shootings. Close your eyes. Hold someone's hand. And listen.

Guns

From Jimmy Tingle | Part of the Jimmy Tingle: Bits from Making Comic Sense series | 04:16

Comedy bits from Making Comic Sense by Jimmy Tingle. Track 13 of 16.

Playing
Guns
From
Jimmy Tingle

Ellen_low_res_tingle_0790_lr_medium_small * Guns and Starbucks
* Sharks and Guns
* Arm the Teachers?

Gals, Guns, and the Gender Gap

From KSFR | Part of the Equal Time with Martha Burk series | 02:30

Two and one half minute commentary by series host Martha Burk on the gender gap and gun control, and why it will make a difference in the next elections.

Podcastphoto_small For years there has been a significant gender gap on the need for more gun control, with the majority of women in favor.  The gap has widened since Sandy Hook, and voters are now planning to punish lawmakers who voted against expanded background checks.

What's Your Kid Packing for Campus?

From KSFR | Part of the Equal Time with Martha Burk series | 02:30

The NRA won the gun control debate long ago. So with the right to bear arms no matter the consequences firmly established in U.S. law and psyche of its citizens, the NRA has to push new laws to stay viable. One of the newer so-called gun rights the group has cooked up is "campus carry."

Podcastphoto_small The NRA won the gun control debate long ago.  So with the right to bear arms no matter the consequences firmly established in U.S. law and psyche of its citizens, the NRA has to push new laws to stay viable. One of the newer so-called gun rights the group has cooked up is "campus carry."

An unlikely friendship transforms the gun debate

From Stephanie Lepp | Part of the Reckonings series | 37:50

In the mid-90’s, Dr. Mark Rosenberg was leading gun violence research at the CDC. Republican Arkansas Congressman Jay Dickey, the NRA’s so-called 'point man on the Hill,’ spearheaded legislation to defund it. Dickey and Rosenberg were on diametrically opposed sides of the gun debate, but fate took a twist. Through unexpected experiences, they managed to become friends, create common ground, and are now jointly calling on Congress to restore CDC funding for gun violence research. Their story is a rare source of hope within one of America’s most polarizing issues: guns.

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"What really blinds people on both sides is thinking that it's either or: either we do nothing and put up with the horrendous tolls of firearm deaths and mass shootings, or we take all the guns away." That's former CDC research director Mark Rosenberg, speaking to one of America’s most polarizing issues. Our country's fierce gun debate pits 'both sides' against each other — proponents of stricter firearm regulation against gun rights advocates. 
 
But when it comes to finding solutions everyone can get behind, we have a major roadblock: there's been no federally funded scientific research on gun violence since 1996. That's when Republican Arkansas Congressman Jay Dickey, the NRA's so-called 'point man on the Hill,' spearheaded a bill that stripped the CDC of $2.6 million — the amount that had been funding Mark Rosenberg’s gun violence research.
 
Conservative Jay Dickey and liberal Mark Rosenberg were on diametrically opposed sides of the gun debate, but fate took a twist. Through unexpected experiences, they managed to become friends, create common ground, and are now jointly calling on Congress to restore CDC funding for gun violence research. Their story is a rare source of unity within the divisive gun debate, and a microcosm of what’s so vitally needed in our political arena beyond.