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Playlist: Veterans Day

Compiled By: PRX Editors

 Credit: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/people/ttumlin/">ttumlin</a>
Image by: ttumlin 
Curated Playlist

Nov. 11 is Veterans Day.

Below are picks chosen by PRX editorial staff. You can see all potential pieces for Veterans Day by using our search.

Hour+ (Over 1:00:01)

World War One Living History Project (w/o newshole)

From Treehouse Productions | 01:56:02

The "WWI Living History Project" honors the sacrifices and contributions of America's last surviving WWI veterans. The producers have travelled the country in search of the men and women who made the world (in President Wilson's words) "safe for democracy." Twelve of these veterans, aged 105 to 115, share their reminiscences, humor and wit on a two-hour radio special hosted by award-winning CBS anchor Walter Cronkite.

Walter_small In 1917-1918, 4.5 million Americans served in World War One. Of that number only 14 remain. The "WWI Living History Project" honors the sacrifices and contributions of America's last surviving WWI veterans. The producers have travelled the country in search of the men and women who made the world (in President Wilson's words) "safe for democracy." Twelve of these veterans, aged 105 to 115, share their reminiscences, humor and wit on a two-hour radio special hosted by award-winning CBS anchor Walter Cronkite. The program begins with a 20-minute introduction to the events of 1914-1917, narrated by Walter Cronkite. It explores the political circumstances that precipitated the outbreak of war, and the advances in communication, armaments and transportation which led to an acceleration of hostilities far beyond the known bounds of continental warfare in Europe. The war went quickly from the drawing-rooms of the European aristocracy to the trenches, where the armies of Europe became enmeshed in a conflict in which the prevailing military strategy was to relentlessly deplete the manpower of the opposing army. This first 28-minute background segment is articulated through a combination of scripted narrative, recordings of period speeches, and short first-person accounts read by professional voice talent. The subsequent 30-minute segment incorporates the first-person experiences of the 12 veterans as they pertain to the events of 1917-1918. The second hour of the program offers a more intimate portrait of the veterans themselves, their experiences and their attitudes toward the war some 90 years after the fact. The program concludes with an essay by Will Everett on insights gained from meeting America's oldest veterans. He shares their lessons for the contemporary age on longevity, history and the future. And he shares his feelings on the death of interview subjects during the period of program production. To receive an audition copy of the program on CD or via FTP download, please contact the producer.

Here's to the Vets

From Loyola Productions, Inc. | Part of the Patterns in Music series | 01:40:15

Commemorating Veteran's Day with this edition of Patterns in Music—a fitting musical tribute to those who served.

Veterans_day_2_small "Patterns in Music" with host, Mike Whorf, celebrates veterans of recent and past years. Included are medleys of the songs we heard during WWII and the Korean & Vietnam wars, as well as a reading of the poem "In Flanders Fields."


Hour (49:00-1:00:00)

Reveal PILOT

From Reveal | 59:01

Reveal is a new investigative program from The Center for Investigative Reporting and PRX. In this pilot: the volume and impact stemming from the VA's over-prescription of opiates to addicted veterans, plus more powerful stories. Hosted by Al Letson from State of the Re:Union and WJCT.

Playing
Reveal PILOT
From
Reveal

Reveal-logo-squareweb_small Reveal is a new investigative program from the The Center for Investigative Reporting and PRX. In this pilot: an exclusive story about the volume and impact stemming from the VA's over-prescripton of opiates to addicted veterans; the attorney behind many of the worst for-profit charities; bodycams for cops; and how one reporter helped one man prove his brother had been abused at a state mental facility. Hosted by Al Letson from State of the Re:Union and WJCT, Jacksonville.

Promos hosted by actor Peter Coyote.

Follow Reveal and comment on Twitter @Reveal and @CIROnline
Join Reveal on Facebook - share, comment and suggest stories to our team

See "additional files" below for links to essential digital assets.

The links include: pictures and captions for each segment of the pilot, links to the interactive map, web copy of the story, a document containing all the embed codes to the videos, a media kit, an infographic image file, and logos.

Use social media to announce your carriage of Reveal.

What stations have done on Twitter:
https://twitter.com/KUTpd/status/384357338431246336
https://twitter.com/wherewelive/status/384347739808493568

https://twitter.com/905wesa/status/384355328235962368 

And on Facebook:
Where We Live (WNPR)
WJCT
WESA

Veterans Day Special

From Al Letson | Part of the State of the Re:Union Fall 2010 Season series | 53:53

The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are sending our veterans home with wounds and obstacles not always clearly visible to the rest of the country. These two current wars also illuminate how veterans of previous eras are still trying to come home years after returning from war. In this episode, State of the Re:Union explores how veterans are serving each other after they come back home from serving the country.

Sotru_vets_square_240_small STATE OF THE RE:UNION
Veterans Day Special
SOTRU explores the challenges veterans face as they return home from war

HOST: Al Letson

DESCRIPTION: The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are sending our veterans home with wounds and obstacles not always clearly visible to the rest of the country. These two current wars also illuminate how veterans of previous eras are still trying to come home years after returning from war. In this episode, State of the Re:Union explores how veterans are serving each other after they come back home from serving the country.

BILLBOARD (:59)
Incue: From PRX and NPR...
Outcue: But first, this news.
 
NEWS HOLE: 1:00- 6:00
 
Segment A (12:29)
Incue: From PRX and NPR...
Outcue: ahead on State of the Re:Union

A. VETERAN'S BOOK PROJECT: Riley Sharbonno returned from a year in Iraq with thousands of digital images that he took, but with no memory of the events the photographs captured. So when artist Monica Haller approached him, the two embarked on a project that ended up as a book of Riley's photographs and writing. This book sparked the Veteran's Book Project, a bookmaking workshop for people who have experienced the wars through many different perspectives. While each book tells a different story, together the books are creating a library of honest conversations about what happens during war.

BREAK: 19:00- 20:00

SEGMENT B (18:59)
Incue: You're listening to State of the Re:Union
Outcue: P-R-X.O-R-G

A. O's GUITAR: Richard O'Connor left for Vietnam with his father's old Montgomery Ward guitar. In between fighting and attacks, he played songs for his fellow marines in order to keep a sense of sanity and calm amidst chaos and devastation. Now, 42 years after returning home, Richard is using his music to welcome back recently returning veterans. But he's also finding his own way home.

BREAK: 39:00- 40:00

SEGMENT C (18:59)
Incue: You're listening to State of the Re:Union
Outcue: This is N-P-R

A. TEAM SEMPER FI: On a foggy Sunday morning in Santa Cruz, California, a team of injured marines take the same camaraderie and strength from the battlefield, and bring it to the competitive sports track.

B. FARMER VETERANS: The country is having a hard enough time dealing with the unemployment rate, so imagine returning home from war, and then having to find a job. But a growing movement of veterans are finding their stride by creating a new mission once they return home: Feeding the country. SOTRU visits two farms that are on this mission.

C. REFLECTION: Al reflects on a country dividing its attention between two wars and their own lives.

D. VOX: A montage of voices of those who have experienced the challenges of coming home, from veterans to family members, of all services, of all eras.

PROGRAM OUT @ 59:00

The fall season of The State of the Re:Union is available now on PRX and the ContentDepot without charge to all public radio stations, and may be aired an unlimited number of times prior to May 31, 2012. The program may be streamed live on station websites but not archived. Excerpting is permitted for promotional purposes only.

The State of the Re:Union is produced by Al Letson, and presented by PRX. Major funding for the State of the Re:Union comes from CPB, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

Thanks for your consideration of this season of SOTRU.  Please contact Israel Smith at ismarketing@yahoo.com or 612-377-3256 with questions or to confirm carriage.

Vets' Healing Journeys To Vietnam (Peace Talks Radio) [59:00/54:00]

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Hour Long Specials series | 59:00

Two United States Vietnam Veterans talk about their journeys back to Vietnam to meet their former enemies and try to heal themselves of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Also conversation with the psychologists who organize the trips.

Vets_celebrating_small On this edition of Peace Talks Radio, stories about former enemies in war, reconciling between each other to achieve peace within themselves and, they hope, delivering a message about the futility of war.  We talk with Dr. Edward Tick first, psychologist and author of book "War and the Soul" and founder of Soldier's Heart, an organization that promotes innovative approaches to healing Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) -among them sponsoring trips for US citizens, veterans and non-vets, back to Vietnam where the US was involved in bloody war for over a decade in the 1960's and early 70's. We also hear from 2 American soldiers, Al Plapp and Tommy Laughlin, who made such a trip back to Vietnam. Carol Boss hosts.

Blue Dimensions B45: for Veterans Day, Vijay Iyer and Mike Ladd Turn Veterans' Dreams Into Songs

From Bluesnet Radio | Part of the Blue Dimensions series | 59:00

Dreams of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans made into poems, with music by Vijay Iyer, and poetry by Mike Ladd 

Iyer_small In this hour of Blue Dimensions , it's a new album called Holding It Down: The Veterans' Dreams Project , where poet Mike Ladd and others take memories of dreams shared by veterans of color of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars and set them as poems, which are then put to music by pianist and composer Vijay Iyer . Haunting memories affect all of them, including a woman in the Air Force who flew drones over Iraq and Afghanistan from a remote control console in Nevada. Also in a military vein, pianist Todd Simon recalls boot camp with a composition he wrote while in boot camp - where he had no access to his instrument, the piano, for eight weeks.

We'll also hear three versions of the blues classic "How Long, How Long Blues," the latest one, the earliest, and the big hit version from 1928 that made it the classic that is. Plus new music from Chick Corea , and Guy Davis (joined by the Blind Boys Of Alabama on a song that dates from the 19th century), and Joseph Daley who has composed music for each of The Seven Heavenly Virtues , a follow-up to his Seven Deadly Sins album of two years ago.

promo included: promo-B45              

A Salute In Song For Veterans Day - 54 & 59 minutes

From Charlie Warren | 59:16

A dramatic fast-moving presentation of the music, history, and voices, of World Wars I & II, Korea, Vietnam, The Gulf War, Bosnia, Iraq, and Afghanistan all in honor of America's veterans.

Veterans_day_2013_small First known as Armistice Day, November 11th , is the day that World War I ended.  So the program begins with the music and history of World War I, then moves quickly to World War II , Korea , Vietnam , Persian Gulf , Bosnia, Iraq , and Afghanistan .

You'll hear songs from rock band Steppenwolf; the Navy Band's Country Current; the BBC Orchestra & Royal Air Force Band; ‘60s rock group Jefferson Airplane; the Glenn Miller Orchestra; Bette Midler; Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young; country music star Toby Keith; plus music from Broadway shows Phantom of the Opera, The King & I, and Hair; and a unique song about The Gulf War from a seldom heard talent.

You'll also witness the heartfelt remembrances of D-Day veterans, Vietnam DJ Adrian Cronauer, Generals Norman Schwarzkopf and Colin Powell, and the voices of Presidents Roosevelt, Eisenhower, and Obama.

You may be surprised to find out that strife over our entry into war has included more than just Vietnam and Iraq.  We sight the hardships of combat, and strongly honor our fighting men and women for their efforts.

HV104- Vet Vox

From Hearing Voices | Part of the Hearing Voices series | 54:00

For Veterans Day: Vietnam, Korean, and World War Two vets, recorded by StoryCorps, along with a Marine Sergeant's recent "Don't Ask Don't Tell" discharge. And we hear plug into the iPods of active-duty troops in Iraq, aksing them what they're listening to, and what their lives are like.

104vetvox200_small

For Veterans Day, Vietnam, Korean, and World War Two vets, recorded by StoryCorps, along with a Marine Sergeant’s recent “Don’t Ask Don’t Tell” discharge. And we plug into the iPods of active-duty troops in Iraq (photo gallery), asking them what they’re listening to, and what their lives are like:

“Specialist “Laser” Lawrence” (2:08) Jake Warga

Soldier Soundtrack, Iraq- Song: “Indestructible” by Disturbed from Indestructible. “You got to show people that soldiers aren’t just war fighters, they’re peace keepers too…”

“Bob and Carol Harllee” (1:34) StoryCorps

Bob Harlee served as an Army Chaplain for 18 years. In 1965, Harllee was sent to Vietnam, and he had to leave his wife and three children behind. One of those children, Carol, now 47, recently asked her father about his life in those days. As part of the 101st Airborne out of Fort Campbell, Ky., Harllee had to reconcile his role as a spiritual guide within a unit whose job it was to destroy the enemy. Still, Harllee says, his task was clear: “to encourage everybody to keep their faith strong, even though they’re in the midst of the most terrible thing that mankind can bring upon itself.” Bob Harllee died in Charlottesville, Va., several months after his interview session. He was 73.

“Staff Sergeant Treen” (3:12) Jake Warga

Soldier Soundtrack, Iraq- Song: “Send in the Clowns” by Barbara Streisand from The Broadway Album. “They’re not really geared towards a democratic or republic sort of society… the biggest issue will be trying to keep Iran or Syria from moving into the power vacuum when we leave…”

“Army-Navy Classic” (0:26) Firesign Theatre

From. their series of of Jack Poet Volkswagon ads

 

“Prayers for Peace” (3:32) Claude Johner

From the 1972 album, Good Morning, Vietnam (Smithsonian Folkways FW05445). Recordings made in Southeast Asia 1968-1972: Radio A.F.V.N.: “Good morning Vietnam…”. The gong of the An Quang Pagoda (call to prayer – the gongs are made out of melted American artilleryshells). Lyndon B. Johnson 1968 speech, “Peace in the World.” The monk Thich Tri Quang Peace in the World. Black Gì in a bar, “What will they all do when they go back to the United States? I do not know what I will do. I hope I’ll be able to do something. I dont want to become a criminal. I want to do my two years and then get out of it. I am not a liar. Beside, I love everybody. That’s all.” The street (motor cycles and sirens). A prostitute, “I love you.”

“Michael Crowe” (01:05) StoryCorps

Michael Crowe tells his son about his sergeant during the Vietnam War. “I’m sure for the rest of his life he’s had nightmares, and he’s had a tortured, tortured soul.”

“Specialist Browning” (1:25) Jake Warga

Soldier Soundtrack, Iraq- Song: “” by Limp Bizkit from Significant Other. “Their culture’s so different than ours, they always stare at all the females when we’re out there — and they don’t want to touch us…”

“D-Day Radio” (6:05) Barrett Golding

Broadcasts from the planes, boats, beaches and newsrooms: excerpts from the CBS network feed on June 6, 1944, when the Allied Forces began taking back Europe (with additional D-Day online photo/audio from FDR, Ed Murrow, and George Hicks famous actuality from the beach-head invasion fleet).

“Major James Lockridge” (3:04) Jake Warga

Soldier Soundtrack, Iraq- Song: “Bohemian Rhapsody” by Queen from A Night At The Opera. “The United States Army can go anywhere at anytime or anyplace…I learned that during the first war. I wouldn’t want to be anybody that had to face the United States…”

“Staff Sergeant Ike Richardson” (1:54) Jake Warga

Soldier Soundtrack, Iraq- Song: “I Love The Name Jesus” by Douglas Miller from (Sung by Sgt Richardson). “I think that we’re in spiritual warfare all the time…most religions are the same, they teach about peace…”

“Specialist Kreigshouser (War House)” (1:18) Jake Warga

Soldier Soundtrack, Iraq- Song: “Raindrops” by Stunt (DJ Alex K remix) from Raindrops. “I think the country will survive; they’re a thriving, caring, generous people…”

“Leon and Angela May” (1:50) StoryCorps

World War II veteran Leon May tells his daughter, Angela, about leaving for basic training at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina. In 1943, May was drafted into the Marines, which was integrated a year earlier. After World War II, May worked for General Motors for almost 50 years. He is now a visual artist, working in oils, pencils, sculpture and clay. This interview is part of StoryCorps Griot, an initiative to record interviews between everyday African Americans across the United States. In West African tradition, the griot is a storyteller who preserves cultural identity and passes it on from generation to generation. The StoryCorps Griot booth is traveling from coast-to-coast collecting these interviews, which will be archived in the Library of Congress and the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.

“The War Machine in Operation” (2:24 excerpt) Claude Johner

From the 1972 album, Good Morning, Vietnam (Smithsonian Folkways FW05445). Recordings made in Southeast Asia 1968-1972: Jets, machine-gun fire from helicopters, air-to-ground pilot communication, artillery coordinates, artillery of 175 (night in the mountains of Khe Sahn). The GIs escape from the war in the dreams of drugs. “I was in Singapore, I bought this water pipe there… Marijuana ! they ought to make it legal.”

“Puyallup Assembly Center” (3:28) Jon Watanabe

Ed Kiyohara was interred at the Puyallup Assembly Center in Washington state during World War II, one of thousands of Americans of Japanese-Americans forced from their homes in coastal states to live in internment camps while American forces battled Japan for control of the Pacific Ocean. He later joined the all-Japanese 442nd Regimental Combat Team, which became the most decorated unit in U.S. history.

“Sergeant Crystal Halbert” (1:48) Jake Warga

Soldier Soundtack, Iraq- Song: “Home” by Blake Shelton from Pure BS. “Home is sitting at my mom’s, waiting for her to finish cooking dinner. All the family’s starting to come over; my kids are running around…”

“Wayman Simpson” (1:42) StoryCorps

Wayman Simpson was captured in 1950, soon after the Korean War began. As a prisoner of war, Simpson came under the command of a Korean officer nicknamed The Tiger, who led the prisoners on a brutal, nine-day trek that claimed nearly 100 American lives. The march ended at a POW camp near the Siberian border. Simpson was released from the camp in 1953. The ordeal came to be known as the Tiger Death March.

“PFC Michael Dalere” (1:32) Jake Warga

Soldier Soundtrack, Iraq- Song: “Undead” by Hollywood Undead from Swan Song. “I’ll always remember my buddy that got killed, how young he was. I don’t think you get over having a friend get killed for trying to better another country…”

“Kendall Bailey” (2:02) StoryCorps

Kendall Bailey talks to his friend Don Davis about his dismissal from the U.S. Marines under the “Don’t Ask Don’t Tell” policy. Bailey became a U.S. Marine in 2001. After five years, Kendall had attained the rank of sergeant and was considering becoming career military. Then one of his fellow officers discovered he was gay.

“Specialist Bowers” (2:31) Jake Warga

Soldier Soundtrack, Iraq- Song: “Kiss My Country Ass” by Rhett Atkins from (Single). “The army standard is supposed to be that females are soldiers too, but a lot of times we still get treated as females, we get treated differently…”

“The Abstract Universe Of War” (0:58 excerpt) Claude Johner

From the 1972 album, Good Morning, Vietnam (Smithsonian Folkways FW05445). Recording made on the aircraft carrier “Enterprise” (in the Gulf of Tonkin), including hydraulic machine chambers, catapults, and arresting gear.

“Petty Officer Roe” (1:58) Jake Warga

Sailor’s Soundtrack- Song: “Sleepy Head” by Passion Pit from Manners. 3rd Class Petty Officer Heather Roe, 20, from Cleveland, is serving on the USS Carl Vinson aircraft carrier, which was early on scene of Haiti’s earthquake to provide humanitarian aid.

“Let A Soldier Drink” (2:52) Jerry Lee Lewis

The killer does Sharkespeare, from the 1968 musical Catch My Soul, based on Othello. More info (with mp3s) at WFMU “Whole Lotta Shakespeare Goin’ On” and Dreamtime.

“You know, if anybody ever asks me why I do this radio show, I could just play them Jerry Lee Lewis singing Shakespeare. That’s what this show is all about.”
—Bob Dylan

Make sure to check Jake Warga audio/photo exhibition: Iraq: Soldier’s Soundtrack.

Glenn Miller Goes To War With The Army Air Force Band

From WFIU | Part of the Afterglow: Jazz and American Popular Song series | 59:01

Perfect for Memorial Day, the Fourth of July, or Veterans Day!

An hour-long program of jazz and popular song...

It was one of the greatest jazz orchestras ever assembled, led by a popular bandleader who took it overseas to raise the morale of the Allied soldiers fighting World War II in Europe—and who then vanished at the height of his popularity.

Glenn_miller_army_air_force_band_small It was one of the greatest jazz orchestras ever assembled, led by a popular bandleader who took it overseas to raise the morale of the Allied soldiers fighting World War II in Europe—and who then vanished at the height of his popularity. 

“Glenn Miller Goes To War With the Army Air Force Band”
features interviews with AAF band member Nat Peck (who signed on with Miller’s military ensemble in 1943 at the age of 19), historian Michael McGerr, and the music of the AAF in all of its configurations—ballads with singer Johnny Desmond, uptempo swing numbers featuring the big band, easy-listening with-strings recordings, a modern-jazz small group side with pianist Mel Powell, and a once-in-a-lifetime encounter with Bing Crosby in England in August 1944. 

Much of this music was heard only on the radio during the war and is far less familiar than that of Miller’s pre-war civilian big band.  We’ll also hear some historic broadcasts—Miller signing off on his last Chesterfield show before joining the military, the last stateside broadcast by the AAF before leaving for Europe, and a moving Christmas Day 1944 broadcast from Paris, the day after Miller was reported missing. 

The Story of the GI Bill

From KALW | 58:39

As World War II came to a close, the United States began mobilizing to support those who had honorably served the nation. The Story of the GI Bill examines that extraordinary package of educational and financial support affectionately — and often reverently — known as the GI Bill. Signed into law as the war ended, the GI Bill propelled millions of Americans into the middle class.

Gibillsoldier_small As World War II came to a close, the United States began mobilizing to support those who had honorably served the nation, offering returning soldiers a remarkable set of benefits. The Story of the GI Bill examines that extraordinary package of educational and financial support affectionately - and often reverently - known as the GI Bill. Signed into law as the war ended, the GI Bill propelled millions of Americans into the middle class. It helped push the nation's economic growth to levels that were simply unimaginable when the war began and was a crucial factor in the longest period of sustained prosperity in the nation's history. In this radio documentary hosted by KALW News director Holly Kernan, the history of the GI Bill is explored by some of its first recipients: the men and women who, raised in the Great Depression and transformed by the war, returned home and became part of a changing America. They include beat poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti, philanthropist Bill Gates Sr., and former Congressional Black Caucus chairman Ronald Dellums. Their stories and others illuminate just how central the GI Bill was to the creation of modern America.

Prisoners of War, The Battle of the Bulge

From Erica Heilman | Part of the Rumble Strip Vermont series | 56:00

This hour features four Vermont soldiers captured at the Battle of the Bulge in World War II. The program weaves together their stories of capture, internment, and the challenges of returning to civilian life.

Bill_busier_1942_small This hour features four Vermont soldiers captured at the Battle of the Bulge in World War II. The program weaves together their stories of capture, internment, and the challenges of returning to civilian life. After more than fifty years these veterans were still haunted daily by this chapter of their lives. This hour offers a deeply personal perspective on a historical battle.

Coming Home: Stories of Veterans Returning from War

From Al Letson | Part of the State of the Re:Union Spring 2013 Season series | 53:53

More than two million veterans have come home so far from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. For returning veterans, reintegrating into society can be a challenge. How do you find your place, when you’ve changed and the people you love don’t recognize you? When that old life is gone and you have to start a new one from scratch. In this hour State of the Re:Union explores reintegration and asks the question: how do you come back home from war?

Sotrupromo_medium_small

State of the Re:Union
Coming Home: Stories of Veterans Returning from War

More than two million veterans have come home so far from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars.  For returning veterans, reintegrating into society can be a challenge.   How do you find your place, when you’ve changed and the people you love don’t recognize you? When that old life is gone and you have to start a new one from scratch.  In this hour State of the Re:Union explores reintegration and asks the question: how do you come back home from war?

Billboard (:58)
Incue: I'm Al Letson
Outcue: But first, this news.

News Hole: 1:00-6:00

SEGMENT A (12:29)
Incue: I'm Al Letson
Outcue: P-R-X-DOT-O-R-G

A-1.  Riley and Monica’s Book
Riley Sharbonno has been home from Iraq for years now.  But he has always had a hard time finding the words to explain his war experience to people close to him.  When a college friend and artist Monica Haller starting asking him—really asking—what Iraq had been like, the words finally came to him.  The product of their conversations was a book that would change the conversation in Riley’s family, and lead Monica to work with veterans across the country.  

SEGMENT B (18:59)
Incue: I'm Al Letson
Outcue: That's ahead on State of the Re:Union

B-1.  What Happened to Jeremiah
In State of the Re:Union’s Wyoming episode, listeners met Iraq War veteran and aspiring country music star Jeremiah Eaton.  Back then, Jeremiah’s future looked promising.  But in this follow-up interview with host Al Letson, we learn that buried psychological wounds have left Jeremiah in a dark place.    

B-2. Sweat Lodge
From Salt Lake City, Utah, State of the Re:Union editor and co-creator Taki Telonidis brings us the story of a group of veterans from different wars who find healing in a very old tradition.

SEGMENT C (18:59)
Incue: You're listening to State of the Re:Union
Outcue: This is N-P-R.

C-1. Team Semper Fi
We follow the action as a team of injured Marines competes in a triathlon, discovering that just as in war, they must rely on each other to survive.

C-2. When War Comes Home
When Pamela Stokes Eggleston met her husband Charles, she lived strictly in the civilian world. Until 9/11, when everything changed.  Charles was deployed in the first year of the Iraq War in 2003 as a sniper, Special Forces.  Today, he’s a wounded warrior, the only survivor in his unit after an IED blast in Mosul in 2005.  And Pamela is a military spouse and a caregiver.  Host Al Letson talks to her about how their lives have changed—and what it means to be a military family in America today. 

C-3.  Wrap-up / Montage
Al reflects on the ways that American society sees its veterans, and closes the episode with a montage of the voices of veterans and the people close to them.  

PROGRAM OUT @ 59:00

Broadcast Window Begins 04/26/2013

The Spring 2013 Season of State of the Re:Union (SOTRU) will be available beginning April 26, 2013, on PRX and the Content Depot without charge to all public radio stations, and may be aired an unlimited number of times prior to December 31, 2013. The program may be streamed live on station websites but not archived. Excerpting is permitted for promotional purposes only. 

State of the Re:Union is produced by Al Letson, presented by PRX, and co-distributed by NPR and PRX.  Major funding for the State of the Re:Union comes from CPB, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. 

Thanks for your consideration of State of the Re:Union with Al Letson. Please contact your NPR Stations relations person or Deborah Blakeley at Blakeley & Company, LLC, at blakeley.deb@gmail.com with questions or to confirm carriage.

 

(For Veteran's Day) My Dad's Favorites: An All-American Greatest Generation Playlist [59:00 / 54:00]

From Paul Ingles | 58:51

Radio producer Paul Ingles sits down with his 89 year old WW II veteran Dad to hear about the music his father feels has been essential to his appreciation of music for all these years. Many references to his war years and how the music connected with the WW II generation.

Dsc00998_small A World War II vet and his wife of 60 years try to educate their radio producer son about the greatest music of their generation.   John Ingles was born in 1922, went to war in Europe, worked for the phone company for 35 years, and is still, today, a devoted family man.  He gave his wife a 45-record changer as one his first gifts to her, signifying that her life with him would be filled with music.  He was sure to keep his record player in good shape for all the years since.  He recently wrote a letter to his three kids, listing his top favorite songs from his life.  His middle son, Paul, the radio producer, interviewed him and his wife about the music selections.  Paul was reminded again about how much his dad knew about the music.  All that time spent reading liner notes pays off in this special.  Selections include Louis Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald, Count Basie, Benny Goodman, Glenn Miller, Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee, Tony Bennett, Frank Sinatra, Ray Charles and more.  An educational, sometimes funny and sometimes moving hour for on or near Father's Day, Memorial Day, Fourth of July or just as a music special.  Stations may use the full length 77:30 version if they like but there are no breaks included.  It's primarily provided for online listening and it includes full versions of most songs and bonus tracks not in the hour-long version.  It's available on PRX at this site: http://www.prx.org/pieces/63079

Students and Soldiers: Captivating Stories from Montana Veterans

From Beth Anne Austein | 59:00

"Students and Soldiers" weaves together wartime stories from twelve Montana veterans of various branches of the U.S. Armed Forces. Interviewed by teams of high school students, the veterans - male and female, early twenties to mid-nineties - reflect more than seventy years of service history, from WWII to the conflicts in Korea, Vietnam, and Iraq.

Img_6463_crop_small Although this collection of veterans' experiences comes from Montana, the recalled experiences of conflict and military service are universal. Through days and weeks of boredom interspersed with moments of sheer terror, through camaraderie and loyalty, exhaustion and fear, military service changes anyone who serves.  During a tour of duty in a foreign country, the patriotism carried into basic training by a new inductee becomes more nuanced, as surprising and sobering impressions of day-to-day life outside the first world sink into the soldier's consciousness.

With recollections of the Bataan Death March and the Doolittle Raids of WWII, of the Navy base romance that led to a decades-long marriage, of guerrilla-style mortar attacks in the highlands of Vietnam and roadside IEDs in the deserts of Iraq, these twelve veterans share some of the most influential experiences of their lives with their teen-aged interviewers. 

"Students and Soldiers" is a collaboration between Montana Public Radio, Willard Alternative High School in Missoula, Montana, the Veterans History Project, and the AmeriCorps Vista program.

A Conversation Between a Peace Activist and a Vietnam Veteran

From KUFM - Montana Public Radio | 59:01

During this program, Betsy Mulligan-Dague, executive director of the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center in Missoula, Montana, and Dan Gallagher, Vietnam Veteran and veteran's advocate, talk about the possibilities for finding common ground in conflicting points of view.

Peace-war_small Although this conversation references (briefly) a Veteran's Day ceremony to take place on the 11th in Missoula, Montana, the content is universal.

Mulligan-Dague talks about her bewilderment after reading (in high school) about a group of young people who committed suicide to protest the Vietnam War. How, she asks, does violence -- even against oneself -- help, or solve anything.

Gallagher describes the hurt he felt when he returned from Vietnam and saw "pure hatred" in the eyes of a young woman who was protesting the war while holding a sign that read "Baby Killers."

Some quotes from the program:

Mulligan-Dague:
"The commandment that 'Thou shalt not kill' was part of what shaped my anti-war views. It wasn't 'Thou shalt not kill unless it's justified, or unless it's here or there,' that was simply it."

"We need to get to the place where the causes we have -- whether it's war, peace, whatever -- are not as important as the caring that we feel for each other."

Gallagher:
"The idea of military service was an extremely important value that I grew up with, so it was rather natural when Vietnam came along that I was going to join the service to serve my country -- I saw that as a noble thing."

"A lot of veterans feel that they can't be proud of being a veteran and be a peace advocate or oppose any given war -- that they have to be one or the other."

Marking Time: Voyage to Vietnam

From Lydia Wilson | 55:00

Graffiti left on a troop transport ship by soldiers heading to the Vietnam War, found accidentally, is salvaged by a couple on a decade-long campaign to find the men who drew the words.

Vietnam_crop_medium_small The drawings bring back surprisingly detailed memories, recreating life aboard the now-destroyed troopship, the General Nelson M. Walker and providing a window into the draft selection process and the types of men who served in Vietnam. 

Featuring period music also recovered from the ship, "Marking Time: Voyage to Vietnam" brings listeners aboard the General Nelson M. Walker as she exists now only in soldiers' memories. Rich with the voices of dozens of soldiers who made the three week voyage across the Pacific, "Marking Time" is a moving tribute for Veterans' Day.

In Honor of Veterans

From Western Folklife Center Media | 53:07

This Veterans' Day program pays tribute to America's fighting men and women through first-hand accounts of battle, as well as music and poetry that draw inspiration from the experience of war.

Default-piece-image-0 Voices of the West: Veterans' Day pays tribute to the fighting men and women of America's armed forces through story, music and poetry. Highlights of our feature include archival recordings made on the battlefield by World War II jouranlist Alvin Josephy, an interview with the first woman to serve in the US marine corps, and a Native American comedian and singer who channels his experiences as a marine into his jokes and songs. "The moving, sincere, and startling moments in this program add up to a remarkable tribute to that whole class of undersung men and women.” Dick Cavett Talk Show Host

The True Glory: Veteran's Day

From Loyola Productions, Inc. | Part of the Chronicle series | 53:45

Remembering both the fallen and the survivors.

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Armistice Day or Veterans Day, whichever you call it, here is a program devoted to an understanding of what it is all about.

17 million men in 8 nations went to the war that was supposed to end all wars. This edition of “Chronicle” remembers those who've fallen and those who've served.


* This program originated on analog tape using non-digital source material. Some tape hiss and record pops should be expected.

 

Episode 7. The Rebellion Within the Rebellion

From ERIC V. TAIT, JR. | Part of the Then I'll Be Free To Travel Home-the Legacy of the New York African Burial Ground series | 59:00

Episodes 7 and 12 (below) of "Then I'll Be Free to Travel Home" celebrate African American veterans of the Revolutionary and Civil Wars and the sacrifices they made to build and keep this country safe.

Family_small "There's a famous quote by a Lutheran Priest, which says 'Everyone recognizes that the Blacks favor the British. If the British win, they will gain their freedom.'" (Prof. Graham Hodges). The British promise that freedom immediately, knowing they need the enslaved Africans in order to defeat the rebellious Colonists. The American Colonists' two-fold dilemma: how to reconcile preaching/fighting for "liberty and justice for all" while still trying to keep enslaved Africans as property; and secondly, can they defeat the British without the help of the Africans in their midst? How it all plays out as two larger-than-life freedom-fighters, one white, one black do battle (and the subsequent effects of that battle), make for a dynamic Segment #7.

Episode 12. Lincoln's Dilemma: Saving the Union or Freeing the Slaves?

From ERIC V. TAIT, JR. | Part of the Then I'll Be Free To Travel Home-the Legacy of the New York African Burial Ground series | 59:00

Episodes 7 (above) and 12 of "Then I'll Be Free to Travel Home" celebrate African American veterans of the Revolutionary and Civil Wars and the sacrifices they made to build and keep this country safe.

Family_small Riots and a Civil War! When the dissident southern states issued their Ordinance of Secession to break from the Union, there was no mention of States Rights, or Tariffs or any of the other so-called key economic reasons for the breakaway. Of the ten reasons cited, eight of them dealt specifically with slavery. (For plantation owners that was the dominant economic issue). Lincoln was elected with a minority of the popular vote; his main concern was preserving the Union. Many of his war policies were highly unpopular - not just in the South, but even in New York - whose mercantile-and-maritime economy was strongly tied to the southern plantation owners and their crops. The Emancipation Proclamation only attempted to free slaves in the rebel Confederacy, not the non-seceeding Border States. But, when coupled with the Conscription Act of 1863 (first ever national Draft) it triggered bloody riots and Civil War. How all these political, war-time issues unfold and play out nationally and locally (as exemplified by the NY City Draft Riots and Battle for Ft. Wagner) makes for an informative and fascinating Segment #12.


Half-Hour (24:00-30:00)

Mothers and Sons

From Marjorie Van Halteren | 26:44

Mothers and Sons is a double portrait of the German sculptor Kathe Kollwitz (1867-1945), who created "The Grieving Parents," a moving memorial to her son who died in WWI, and the contemporary German-American sculptor Suse Lowenstein, who created an equally monumental work to honor her son, a victim in the 1988 Lockerbie disaster.

Suselogo_small Mothers and Sons is a double portrait of the German sculptor Kathe Kollwitz (1867-1945), who created "The Grieving Parents," a moving memorial to her son who died in WWI, and the contemporary German-Americansculptor Suse Lowenstein , who created an equally monumental work to honor her son, a victim in the 1988 Lockerbie disaster. Both women describe how their work (18 years for Kathe, 14 years for Suse), became a path through their grief, bearing witness to the transforming power of art and creation. Mothers and Sons is a collaboration between Helen Engelhardt, a storyteller and performer, and Marjorie Van Halteren, sound artist. Kathe's diaries are performed by Helen, with Marjorie composing sound and music. Sound recorded on location on Long Island and in Southern Belgium. Mothers and Sons is the third program in a trilogy exploring the themes of war, loss, memory, and regeneration. The two other half hours, "Unquiet Graves," and "Yesterday and Forever, are also available.

The 20th Anniversary of the Lockerbie disaster is December 21, 2008.

Veterans of Occupation: From Iraq to Wall Street

From Making Contact | Part of the Making Contact series | 29:00

On this edition, we bring you the voices of Veterans from Occupy Wall Street and a special report on veterans returning home from war and the struggles they endure from inadequate healthcare to the inability in finding employment.

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Over two million Americans have fought in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. They return to a nation in economic crisis and a third of those veterans come home to face serious medical conditions. Many of those veterans now consider themselves the 99 percent, and have joined a second Occupation, Occupy Wall Street. On this edition, a special report on veterans standing in solidarity with Occupy Wall Street movements and an encore presentation about veterans returning home from war and the struggles they endure produced by Aaron Glantz.

 

Transforming the Trauma: Soldiers Stories

From Making Contact | Part of the Making Contact series | 29:00

Two generations of veterans cope with PTSD—looking to heal themselves and heal the world. Featuring S. Brian Wilson, author of “Blood on the Tracks”

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Like many soldiers returning home from Vietnam, former Air Force captain S. Brian Willson became a peace activist.  One day in 1987, when he lost his legs during a protest against a shipment of weapons, it only strengthened his resolve.  It was his way of dealing with what he experienced at war…and now thousands of new veterans are trying to find their way.  On this edition, two generations of veterans cope with PTSD—looking to heal themselves and heal the world.

Special thanks to KALW radio, KPFA radio and Rising Sand Radio at KZSU at Stanford 

Bracelets of Grace: The Vietnam War Story of Major Stanley Horne

From David Berner | 29:17

The year 2010 marks the 40th anniversary of the POW-MIA bracelets of the Vietnam War era. (November 11, 1970 - Veterans Day.) This documentary is about the lasting impact of those bracelets told through the story of one U.S. Air Force pilot, Major Stanley Horne. In 1968 his fighter bomber was shot down over North Vietnam and his name was then engraved, like so many others classified as POW or MIA, on metal bracelets distributed to millions.

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In January of 1968 U.S. Air Force Major Stanley Horne was listed as missing-in-action (MIA) after his fighter-bomber was shot down over North Vietnam. Soon afterward his name was one of the many engraved on a POW-MIA bracelet. His story and the stories of those who wore his bracelet, not only contribute to the narrative of the impact of those bracelets, but also to the story of how America struggled with the war and tried to heal from the scars it left behind.

The POW-MIA bracelets of the Vietnam War era made a lasting impression on all those who wore them. Millions of bracelets with the name of a missing or imprisoned soldier were worn on the wrists of family, friends, supporters and critics of the war. It may have been the only item - the only common bond - that crossed the tumultuous political divide. 

BRACELETS OF GRACE: The Vietnam War Story of Major Stanley Horne includes audio from the personal tapes sent back and forth between Southeast Asia and Major Horne’s family in Madison, Wisconsin. It also includes recollections from the young California college students who originated the bracelets, those who wore Major Horne’s bracelet, and those who wrote hundred of letters to the Horne family until the major’s remains were finally recovered in April, 1990, 22 years after his plane was shot down.  

November 11, 2010 is Veterans Day and the 40th anniversary of the POW-MIA bracelets of the Vietnam War.

The documentary is available to broadcast in its entirety or in three installments. 

 

 

The Mikie Show #50, Joe

From Michael Carroll | Part of the The Mikie Show series | 28:01

The Mikie Show is a half hour radio variety show, and this episode features an interview with Major Joe Da Silva, US Army. He’s done three tours in Iraq and was also in Afghanistan. Just having completed his Masters, he’s on his way back to West Point to teach. We talk about the challenges of commanding, leadership and the soldiers he’s had the pleasure to serve with.

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We return with episode fifty! Yes, your fiftieth show cocktail celebration can start right now! Let’s hope it also includes listening to the show!

It’s a good one, featuring an interview with Major Joe Da Silva, US Army. He’s done three tours in Iraq and was also in Afghanistan. Just having completed his Masters, he’s on his way back to West Point to teach (he is a West Point grad, class of 2002). We talk about the challenges of commanding, leadership and the soldiers he’s had the pleasure to serve with. There’s also another guest coming by, but I lost the thing with his name on it, where did I put that… No matter, I’m sure he’ll show up named or not. Plus there’s a quiz and some news you’ll never find anywhere else! Why exclaim that? Because it’s news you’ll never find anywhere else! All that and more awaits you behind the little play arrow. Wait, do I hear ice clinking in a cocktail glass? I heart you!


Segments (9:00-23:59)

The Vietnam Tapes of Michael A. Baronowski

From Jay Allison | 19:17

In 1966, a young marine took a reel-to reel tape recorder with him into the Vietnam War. For two months, until he was killed in action, Michael Baronowski made tapes of his friends, of life in fighting holes, of combat. 34 years later, his comrade Tim Duffie brought Baronowski's three-inch reels to Lost & Found Sound.

Mikeprx_small In 1966, a young marine took a reel-to reel tape recorder with him into the Vietnam War. For two months, until he was killed in action, Michael Baronowski made tapes of his friends, of life in fighting holes, of combat. 34 years later, his comrade Tim Duffie brought Baronowski's three-inch reels to Lost & Found Sound. The Vietnam Tapes of Lance Corporal Michael A. Baronowski aired on NPR's All Things Considered on the 25th anniversary of America's withdrawal from the Vietnam. The documentary shed light on the experience of that war, and, in some measure, of all wars. It used the power of radio to reveal the heart through the voice and to see in the dark. It combined the rare talent of the late Baronowski as a "correspondent" from the front, the compassion of his dedicated platoon mate Duffie. This program struck a universal chord with listeners--with those who fought the war, those who protested it, and those who weren't even born at the time. It generated perhaps the greatest outpouring of response in the history of NPR's All Things Considered to date. The documentary won the first Gold Award in the Third Coast Audio Festival competition. Produced by Christina Egloff with Jay Allison.

Vietnam Bones

From Karen Brown | 10:02

A man tries to repatriate the bones of a Viet Cong soldier that his father took from the jungle, 35 years earlier.

Playing
Vietnam Bones
From
Karen Brown

Default-piece-image-2 This is the story of Dereyk Patterson, a man trying to repatriate the bones of a Viet Cong soldier -- stolen by his father during the Vietnam War. Dereyk's father, Steve Patterson, died last year in a helicopter accident, leaving the remains behind in his garage. As Dereyk tries to do the right thing, he also tries to come to terms with his own stormy relationship with his father, and to understand what would drive a young man to take such a morbid "souvenir" in the first place. This piece first ran on WFCR in Amherst, MA in June of 2003. It also ran on WNPR in Hartford, Connecticut, and WAMC in Albany, NY. It won a Massachusetts Associated Press Award in 2004. NOTE: Programmers can edit out the introduction, and the station-specific outcue.

Chuck the homeless interloper

From Shane McLaughlin | 11:04

I came home one night to find a homeless vet living in my house. This is the story of Chuck, a wanderer with PTSD and a book in-progress about living in Vietnam as a child and fighting there as an adult.

Dscf1734_small "Chuck" was paranoid, suspicious, delusional and unpredictable...all the things you'd expect from a Vietnam vet who had done two tours of duty. He was also living in my house.

The WASPs: Women Pilots of WWII

From Radio Diaries | 21:43

In the early 1940s, the US Airforce faced a dilemma. Thousands of new airplanes were coming off assembly lines and needed to be delivered to military bases nationwide, yet most of America's pilots were overseas fighting the war. To solve the problem, the government launched an experimental program to train women pilots.

Postcard_small In the early 1940s, the US Airforce faced a dilemma. Thousands of new airplanes were coming off assembly lines and needed to be delivered to military bases nationwide, yet most of America's pilots were overseas fighting the war. To solve the problem, the government launched an experimental program to train women pilots. They were known as the WASPs, the Women Airforce Service Pilots. Broadcast on NPR's All Things Considered on Dec. 18, 2002.

JazzStories: Randy Weston — From Brooklyn to the Berkshires and Back

From Murray Street Productions | Part of the JazzStories series | 12:57

Pianist Randy Weston has seen a lot people and places in his life. Born in Brooklyn in 1926 and served in the US Army during World War II. But it was jazz that exposed him to the most diverse travels.

Randy_weston_small Pianist Randy Weston has seen a lot people and places in his life.  Born in Brooklyn in 1926 and served in the US Army during World War II. But it was jazz that exposed him to the most diverse travels.  Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Ken Druker unearths a live interview with Randy Weston about the people and places that he’s seen in his life — from Langston Hughes and Candido — to Brooklyn and the woods of the Berkshires and back again.

Whidbey Island Veteran Resource Center

From Sarah Waller | 11:50

Since the wars began in Iraq and Afghanistan in 2003, 56,000 service men and women have returned to Washington state. Almost 2,000 of those veterans have settled in Island County. And of those, it's estimated that one out of five suffer from PTSD or some form of major depression. A new Veterans Resource Center on Whidbey Island is providing services to help those veterans make the transition from war to civilian life.

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Since the wars began in Iraq and Afghanistan in 2003, 56,000 service men and women have returned to Washington State.  Almost 2,000 of those veterans have settled in Island County.  And of those, it’s estimated that one out of five suffer from PTSD or some form of major depression.  That’s according to a RAND Corporation study.  A new Veterans Resource Center on Whidbey Island is providing services to help those veterans make the transition from war to civilian life.

KUOW's Sarah Waller spoke with the woman who co-founded it, Judith Gorman.

When the Spam hit the fan in Nam

From Rich Halten | 10:36

With the passing of more and more of WWII's veterans, the largest number of vets alive to mark this Veterans Day are those who served in Vietnam. Two Vietnam vets separated in battle during the Tet Offensive by the Vietcong in 1968, came together recently to tell their very different stories of survival. One was captured and spent five years in a prison camp, the other feels angels must have saved him from a similar fate -- or worse.

Hue_billets_post-tet_small With the passing of more and more of WW2's veterans, the largest number of vets alive to mark this Veteran's Day is those who served in Vietnam. Two Vietnam vets separated in battle during the Tet Offensive by the Vietcong in 1968, came together recently to tell their very different stories of survival.  One was captured and spent five years in a prison camp, the other feels angels must have saved him from a similar fate -- or worse.

Anna on the Homefront

From Whit Richardson | 09:20

Anna Cyr is the wife of a member of the Maine National Guard who is deployed to Iraq with the 133rd Engineer Battalion. She lives in Lewiston, Maine, with her sister-in-law, who is married to Anna's husband's brother, who is also in Iraq with the 133rd. They create a new household where they support each other financially, emotionally, and with the practical everyday things, until their husbands return home.

Jasonsign_small Anna Cyr is the wife of a member of the Maine National Guard who is deployed to Iraq with the 133rd Engineer Battalion. She lives in Lewiston, Maine, with her sister-in-law, who is married to Anna's husband's brother, who is also in Iraq with the 133rd. They create a new household where they support each other financially, emotionally, and with the practical everyday things, until their husbands return home. This piece was developed from an expanded written documentary I undertook as a writing student at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Portland, Maine. After my semester as a writing student there I used the taped interviews with Anna Cyr I had collected and, after learning radio production from Rob Rosenthal at the Salt Institute, turned them into this radio piece. The initial version of 'Anna on the Homefront' I produced is 9:19, the second, somewhat hastily cut, version is 6:36, which is the version that aired on Big Talk, on WMPG, Portland's community radio station.


Cutaways (5:00-8:59)

A Hug on the Way Home

From Julia Barton | 05:10

When U.S. soldiers come back home on leave, they fly through a few central airports. For soldiers headed west of the Mississippi River, that airport is DFW. The USO recently greeted its millionth soldier coming through Dallas/Fort Worth. Many of those millions have been greeted by two women. Producer Julia Barton met them and has this story.

Hug_small When U.S. soldiers come back home on leave, they fly through a few central airports. For soldiers headed west of the Mississippi River, that airport is DFW. The USO recently greeted its millionth soldier coming through Dallas/Fort Worth. Many of those millions have been greeted by two women. Producer Julia Barton met them and has this story.

(I have not yet begun to rot)

From Nate DiMeo | Part of the the memory palace series | 07:05

In which we hear the story of Revolutionary War hero, John Paul Jones, and the Civil War hero who found his coffin, 100 years after it had been lost in a Paris cememtary.

Jpj_240_small This is an episode of the memory palace podcast.  Listen to the whole series at www.thememorypalace.us
Each episode is a short (between 1:30 and 5:30) water-coolery story of the past, with an emphasis on American History

A war at home: a soldier’s mission against PTSD

From KALW | 08:54

For some soldiers, post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, really is a four-letter word. A PTSD diagnosis means you may need treatment for the rest of your life. It can deeply affect personal and professional relationships, and it often comes with a social stigma.

Jeremy Profitt served in the army in both Afghanistan and Iraq and came back with PTSD. Now that’s he’s out, he has a new mission: to clear up misconceptions about the illness. Priscilla Yuki Wilson has his story.

Picture_2_small For some soldiers, post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, really is a four-letter word. A PTSD diagnosis means you may need treatment for the rest of your life. It can deeply affect personal and professional relationships, and it often comes with a social stigma. Jeremy Profitt served in the army in both Afghanistan and Iraq and came back with PTSD. Now that’s he’s out, he has a new mission: to clear up misconceptions about the illness. Priscilla Yuki Wilson has his story.

A Veteran's Son Goes to Vietnam

From Graham Shelby | 07:10

Writer Graham Shelby grew up wondering what had happened to his father in Vietnam. Just after graduating from college in 1994, Graham went to find out. Among his most memorable stops: an orphanage just outside the city of Nha Trang.

Duy_small Writer Graham Shelby grew up wondering what had happened to his father in Vietnam. Just after graduating from college in 1994, Graham went to find out. Among his most memorable stops: an orphanage just outside the city of Nha Trang.

Retiring with Dahlias

From Liz Jones | 08:26

A WW2 vet reflects on his time as a marine and his passion for growing dahlias.

Dahlia_small Vic Oder was a rifle coach with the U.S. Marines for 12 years. He served during World War II and retired from the military in 1946. Now 82-years-old, he spends most of his time in the garden, growing thousands of dahlias every year. He talked to producer Liz Jones about his flowers and his service during the war.

The Cost of War

From Blunt Youth Radio Project | 07:45

Weeks after S. Spencer Scott interviewed Lavinia Gelineau about the loss of her husband Chris, a young soldier who was killed in Iraq, Lavinia herself was murdered by her abusive father. A meditation on life during wartime.

Default-piece-image-2 Blunt Youth Radio Project producer S. Spencer Scott interviewed Lavinia Gelineau about the loss of her husband Chris, a young soldier who was recently killed in Iraq. Weeks later Lavinia Gelineau was murdered by her abusive father. Scott deftly weaves the two tragedies together in a thoughtful commentary about the cost of war. Versions of this feature originally aired on the Maine Public Broadcasting Network and on WMPG's Blunt in Portland, ME.

Green Army Hat

From Youth Media Project | 05:17

A student at United World College, Nelson Diaz Monterrosa, worked with Youth Media Project's Summer Intensive 2010 to produce this moving piece about his relationship with his War Veteran grandfather. The piece is at once humorous and touching as it shares Nelson's experience with his grandfather's illness.

2163474742_5c02f35e86_m_small A student at United World College, Nelson Diaz Monterrosa, worked with Youth Media Project's Summer Intensive 2010 to produce this moving piece about his relationship with his War Veteran grandfather.  The piece is at once humorous and touching as it shares Nelson's experience with his grandfather's illness.

Mothers in Uniform

From KRCC-FM | 05:42

Eric Whitney talks to military mothers who are deployed in Iraq.

Westernskieslogoprx_small Eric Whitney talks to military mothers who are deployed in Iraq. They tell us what it's like to be serving their country far away from their children.


Drop-Ins (2:00-4:59)

The Forgotten 14% – Our Female Vets

From KSFR | Part of the Equal Time with Martha Burk series | 02:30

When it comes to how we treat our veterans,we do pretty well in some areas, but fall down in others. Homelessness is one of the worst. It’s way too high for both male and female vets – and this is one area where women are catching up to men.

Podcastphoto_small Substance abuse and mental illness are leading causes of homelessness for male veterans.  But homelessness for our female ex-soldiers actually starts before they leave the military.  A huge factor is sexual trauma from rapes and other assaults during their service. Because they couldn’t report the crimes, or were punished when they did, many women suffer from post traumatic stress disorder and lose their jobs, family, and homes.

The Things They Carry: U.S. Soldiers in Afghanistan (Series)

Produced by Jake Warga

This series asks U.S. soldiers serving in Afghanistan what they have to carry around with them every day—from the physical to the emotional.

Most recent piece in this series:

The Things They Carry: Specialist Lackey

From Jake Warga | Part of the The Things They Carry: U.S. Soldiers in Afghanistan series | 03:03

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A soldier’s personal experience of serving in Afghanistan through what they have to carry—from the physical to the emotional: The helmets, the guns, the reminders of home, the hardships of deployment, things they brought with them, the things they will leave behind.

And the memories they will have to carry with them for the rest of their lives.

Inspired by Tim O'Brien's Pulitzer-nominated book “The Things They Carried”

The series offers a larger look at what America, as a nation, will have from its longest running war.

This production is part of the Global Story Project, with support from the Open Society Foundations. Presented by PRX, the Public Radio Exchange.

Soldiers Soundtracks to War--IRAQ (Series)

Produced by Jake Warga

Portraits of soldiers, war, and Iraq through the music they listen to on their iPods.

Most recent piece in this series:

Specialist Bowers

From Jake Warga | Part of the Soldiers Soundtracks to War--IRAQ series | 02:01

100103_028_small “Specialist Bowers and I’m from Pennsylvania and I’m 20 years old. This song is basically the story of my life and half our company. Half of our company is split up between the West Virgina country boys and then Pittsburgh city kids. It’s called “Kiss My Country Ass” – Rhett Akins..."

StoryCorps: Denny Meyer

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 01:45

U.S. Navy veteran Denny Meyer remembers what it was like to be gay and a sailor in the late 1960s.

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When Denny Meyer enlisted in the Navy in 1968, he had to hide the fact that he was gay.

At the time, homosexuality wasn’t tolerated in the Navy and anyone found to be gay would be discharged from service.

At StoryCorps, Meyer recalled what it was like to be gay and a sailor in those days.

WarInVoice Medley

From Bianca Giaever | Part of the WarInVoice series | 03:34

Veterans share their experiences. STATION WARNING: UNBLEEPED swears listed in content advisory.

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Hell and Back Again's Unique Sound Design

From TurnStyle | 03:17

Danfung Dennis worked for several years as a war photographer in Iraq and Afghanistan. In time he came to feel that still photos didn’t portray what he was seeing and hearing on the ground. The romantic image of war he had grown up with from video games and movies was not what he was finding while embedded with Marines in the field.

Hellprx_small Danfung Dennis worked for several years as a war photographer in Iraq and Afghanistan. In time he came to feel that still photos didn’t portray what he was seeing and hearing on the ground. The romantic image of war he had grown up with from video games and movies was not what he was finding while embedded with Marines in the field. “There isn’t an orchestra playing when you’re running through a battlefield,” says Dennis. “There isn’t you know, huge drums. It’s just pure terror.”

The Decisions Project - 23 - Marriage Before Deployment

From Aengus Anderson | Part of the The Decisions Project series | 03:43

A single mom decides to marry her best friend before his deployment to Iraq.

Decisionsproject_mp3_small During the summer of 2010, producer Aengus Anderson rode his motorcycle around North America and interviewed 220 people about the hardest decisions they had ever made. A cross-section of their conversations are presented here as The Decisions Project.

The Military Honor Guard (short version)

From Charles Lane | 04:27

A look at the history and tradition of the military funeral.

Buglerweb_small The solemn last rite for every solider is the military funeral. Whether for the young men and women killed in Iraq and Afghanistan or veterans of World War II, each one of them receives the same military honor. That ceremony has a deep and rich tradition. This piece spends time with an honor guard as the practice for an upcoming funeral. This piece will work very well as a side bar to a local story about a fallen solider. The longer version is 20 seconds longer and is more elegant in the transitions. It is here: http://prx.org/pieces/7543

World War One and Armistice Day

From Lester Graham | 03:45

A look at World War One and the day that ultimately became Veterans Day.

Wwi_small Veterans Day was originally Armistice Day, the day that World War I was to come to an end. Many people are not aware of that connection. This piece looks at one veteran's experiences during the war. He describes the horrible conditions and carnage seen by the troops. The huge death toll (117-thousand American soldiers and sailors dead)is hard to fathom. Too often World War I and its veterans have been overshadowed by the World War II generation. However, in many ways those who fought in the First World War endured a more brutal conflict. This is the first this piece has aired in this form. This length should fit nicely into a Morning Edition c-segment or as an ATC insert.

Dear Mom: I Joined the Marines

From Curie Youth Radio | 01:49

An apology and a plea for a mother's understanding when a son joins the Marines.

Omar_small Omar joined the Marines this year. His piece tries to end a battle with his mother about signing up in the first place. This letter to a mother shows us the love that remains between a mother and son who cannot find a common ground. It gives us a glimpse of the fear and anxiety of a parent of a new recruit as well as the bittersweet certainty of an eighteen-year-old who naturally believes in his own immortality. This piece was broadcast on Chicago Public Radio, WBEZ 91.5, on March 18, 2005.

Henry Nicholas Gunther, November 11, 1918

From Jonathan Thomas Stratman | Part of the Who Died Today series | 03:00

In a cruel twist of fate, Henry Gunther "cheated life" by dying needless on a field in France, in the last seconds of World War I.

Who_died_today_blue2_small Officially the last American to be killed in World War I. In a cruel twist of fate, Henry Gunther "cheated life" by dying needlessly on a field in France, in that war's final seconds. (Also available in a non-date-specific version)