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Playlist: Summer Specials 2013

Compiled By: PRX Editors

 Credit: <a href="http://www.shutterstock.com/pic-124818616/stock-photo-inscription-on-wet-sand-summer-concept-photo-of-summer-vacation.html">Shutterstock</a>
Image by: Shutterstock 
Curated Playlist

We've got specials for you, perfect for air this summer.

Diary of A Bad Year: A War Correspondent's Dilemma

From Atlantic Public Media | Part of the The Transom Radio Specials series | 58:19

NPR's Kelly McEvers' unprecedented and intimate portrait of the sacrifices reporters and their families make to tell untold stories -- and the sometimes dangerous allure of the job.

Independently produced with Jay Allison.

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In early 2011, NPR's Kelly McEvers started to see things in slow motion. She cried unpredictably. She was a correspondent in the turbulent Middle East, in the time of the Arab uprisings. Colleagues and friends were being kidnapped. Some were getting killed. 

But still, she went toward the story. The next year, 2012, was the deadliest year on record for journalists. It was a huge hit to the "tribe" of war correspondents of which Kelly is a part. These are people who choose to go into conflict, to put themselves at risk. But they also enjoy the role, the adrenaline, the life. Some of them, like Kelly, have children. 

As she reported in dangerous places like Bahrain, Yemen, and Syria, she braved gunfire, explosions, and tear gas, recording diaries the whole time. She also turned her reporting skills on her own life, seeking advice from doctors, scientists, and colleagues. Her goal was to answer one question: Why do otherwise intelligent people risk their lives when they don't have to? 

Twenty months later, in collaboration with independent producer Jay Allison of Transom.org, the result is a documentary radio hour called "Diary of a Bad Year: A War Correspondent's Dilemma."  

The program includes interviews with  British journalist Anna Blundy, whose father, the late war correspondent David Blundy, was killed by a sniper while covering the Salvadoran Civil War; BBC World Affairs correspondent, Paul Wood; Jon Lee Anderson international investigative reporter for The New Yorker; international journalist, Christiane Amanpour, for CNN/ABC; and Sebastian Junger, who with the late Tim Hetherington made the award-winning film, Restrepo, about the war in Afghanistan. 

It's a gripping story, an unprecedented and intimate portrait of the sacrifices reporters and their families make to tell untold stories -- and the sometimes dangerous allure of the job. 

It premieres on the public radio website, Transom.org, on June 25th, and is available to public radio stations through NPR and PRX.  

Produced by:

Kelly McEvers
 is a Middle East correspondent for National Public Radio based in Beirut, Lebanon, mainly covering the conflict in Syria. In 2012 she was awarded the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia award, the Peabody Award, the Gracie Award and an Overseas Press Club citation.

Jay Allison is variously the founder, collaborator, and producer of The Moth Radio Hour, This I Believe, Lost & Found SoundTransom.orgPRX.org, and WCAI on Cape Cod where he lives. He has created hundreds of documentaries and has received six Peabody Awards.

Transom.org  channels new work and voices to public radio, with a focus on the power of story, and on the mission of public media in a changing media environment. Transom won the first Peabody Award ever granted exclusively to a website. Transom.org is a project of Atlantic Public Media which runs the Transom Story Workshops and founded WCAI, the public radio station in Woods Hole, Massachusetts.

 

 

               


                           Support for this work comes from the National Endowment for the Arts

                                                             

The Best Albums of 2013...So Far

From Sound Opinions | 59:00

Jim and Greg reveal their favorite albums of the year at this midway point. They also say goodbye to a legendary New Jersey Club and review the latest from desert rockers Queens of the Stone Age. Later it's Greg's turn to choose a song he can't live without to add to the Desert Island Jukebox.

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NEWS:

• Hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot say goodbye to the legendary rock club Maxwell’s. The Hoboken, NJ venue where Bruce Springsteen shot the video for “Glory Days,” Nirvana played and Yo La Tengo annually celebrated Chanukah, will close its doors in July. Sound Opinions also recorded an episode with The Feelies there in 2008.

• Jim and Greg also remember Marvin Junior, the baritone in Chicago doo-wop and R&B group The Dells. He died last week at age 77.

FEATURE:

As we approach the year’s midway point, Jim and Greg count down The Best Albums of 2013, so far. Some of their favorite albums include releases by David Bowie, Foxygen and Chance the Rapper.

REVIEW:

Jim and Greg review Like Clockwork, the sixth studio album from desert rockers Queens of the Stone Age.

DESERT ISLAND JUKEBOX:

It’s Greg’s turn this week. He chooses “Salty Dog” by English symphonic rock group Procol Harum.

YOUR SOUND OPINIONS:

At the end of the show we hear comments from listeners.

Walking Across America ~ Advice for a Young Man

From Atlantic Public Media | Part of the The Transom Radio Specials series | 53:57

Andrew Forsthoefel set out at age 23 to walk across America, East to West, 4000 miles, with a sign on him that said, "Walking to Listen". This hour, co-produced with Jay Allison, tracks his epic journey. It's a coming of age story, and a portrait of this country - big-hearted, wild, innocent, and wise.

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From Andrew Forsthoefel:

I decided to walk across the country for several reasons. Producing an hour-long radio essay about it was not one of them. When I left home, I had no idea what would become of the tape I hoped to record.

At the beginning of the walk, I thought it would be a good idea to have a focus question for the interviews. The question was about transformation. What does it mean to you and when have you experienced it? I was at a transformative time in my own life, so that question seemed right.

I quickly abandoned the idea, though. It seemed too contrived or constraining. Instead, I just started talking to people about their lives and, sometimes, what their lives had taught them. I’d ask people about the idea of home, aloneness, family, love, death; all sorts of stuff.

I thought people would be resistant to being interviewed. Not so. The vast majority wanted to be heard, and they didn’t mind the recorder. Nearly every time, they had something they wanted to share.  I was wearing a sign that said “Walking to Listen,” and there was no shortage of people to listen to.

Support for this work comes from National Endowment for the Arts and the Transom Donor Fund:


                                                 

A Year of Future Docs, in One Hour

From Kristin Espeland Gourlay | Part of the Future Docs series | 52:45

Throughout the school year, we've been following two bright, young, future doctors. Now, we're wrapping up the journey with a one-hour documentary about the crucible of medical school, set against the backdrop of some of the most dramatic changes in health care in a generation.

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Throughout the school year, we've been following two bright, young, future doctors. Now, we're wrapping up the journey with a one-hour documentary about the crucible of medical school, set against the backdrop of some of the most dramatic changes in health care in a generation.

 

Future Docs: A Lens for Looking at What's Happening in Health Care
Over the past school year, I’ve been following two future doctors, Sarah Rapoport and Peter Kaminski, through their second year at Brown University’s Warren Alpert Medical School.

Why? Because health care as we know it is transforming. We’re moving from a doctor-centered, fee-for-service system to a more patient-centered, pay-for-quality way of doing things. Plus, we as a nation are transforming, too. We’re growing older and sicker, and scientific advances are emerging all the time to help prolong our lives. The bottom line: tomorrow’s doctors will need to know how to navigate a brand new world.

So I set out to learn how medical education is adapting through the eyes of these two future docs, Sarah and Peter.

Full Documentary
We meet Peter and Sarah in segment one .  Although lots has changed for med students these days, some traditions and experiences endure, as they show us. Then, we take a look at the ways in which medical school actually has changed, as schools like Brown University and others revamp their curricula to adapt to the changing world of health care. In segment two, we hear again from Sarah and Peter as they begin to explore specialties. And we pose the question, "Are we training enough new doctors?" In segment three , we examine how medical schools are adapting to our nation's new reality: a population that's older and sicker than ever. And we find out what new ethical challenges tomorrow's doctors will face. We wrap up with a final visit with Sarah and Peter, just as they're getting ready to head into their third year of medical school and the new and unfamiliar world of the hospital wards.