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Playlist: Presidents' Day

Compiled By: PRX Editors

 Credit: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/24905220@N00/3202845021/">Ben Templesmith</a>
Image by: Ben Templesmith 
Curated Playlist

Feb. 20 is Presidents' Day.

Check out how we choose the Editors' Picks.

Hour (49:00-1:00:00)

Lincoln in Music and Letters

From The WFMT Radio Network | 58:30

Take an hour-long, song-filled journey on Abraham Lincoln’s funeral train with Lincoln in Music and Letters. Never before had a president’s death been memorialized by rail. Travelling 1,654 miles through seven states, it was a cutting-edge technical notion - extraordinary for its time - but well suited to the extraordinary times the United States faced. You’ll hear how the image of Lincoln, a seemingly awkward man from a humble background, transcended that troubled era and stepped into history.

Abraham_lincoln_november_1863_prx_small

Audio for this series will become available January 2, 2017.

This series is available free of charge to all affiliate stations for one broadcast through January 1, 2018

For more information contact:

Estlin Usher at eusher@wfmt.com (p) 773-279-2112 
Tony Macaluso at tmacaluso@wfmt.com (p) 773-279-2114

Lincoln in Music and Letters

Take an hour-long, song-filled journey on Abraham Lincoln’s funeral train with Lincoln in Music and Letters.  Never before had a president’s death been memorialized by rail.  Travelling 1,654 miles through seven states, it was a cutting-edge technical notion - extraordinary for its time - but well suited to the extraordinary times the United States faced.  You’ll hear how the image of Lincoln, a seemingly awkward man from a humble background, transcended that troubled era and stepped into history. 

Hosted by Coco Elysses and written by award-winning audio producer George Zarr, the program features nationally acclaimed singer/songwriter and folk musician Chris Vallillo.  Showcased are letters and diaries of the period, many unpublished and from the collection of Chicago’s Newberry Library.  Plus the songs our citizens sang, some long unheard or unrecorded.  Included are dramatic scenes based on actual historical dialogue and accounts.   Lincoln in Music and Letters presents the American voices of those who lived through a difficult time, civilians and soldiers alike, and brings them to vivid life.

Host:                                      Coco Elysses

Actors:                                   Stefan Brün, Greg Hardigan, Jenny Magnus, Marssie Mencotti and Beau O’Reilly

Producer, Writer & Director:    George Zarr

Featured performer:               Chris Vallillo (vocals & guitar)

Executive Producer:                Tony Macaluso

Managing Producer:                Heather McDougall

Production Assistant:              Rebecca Nystedt

Sponsor/Underwriter:             Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Foundation

 

The program is produced in collaboration with Chicago’s Newberry Library

 

Special thanks to the program’s advisory team:

·         Thomas Campbell, of the Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Foundation

·         Kristin Emery, Fellowships and Seminars Manager, Newberry Library

·         D. Bradford Hunt, Vice President for Research and Academic Programs, Newberry Library

·         Thomas J. Kernan, PhD, Assistant Professor of Music History at Chicago College of Performing Arts at Roosevelt University

 

Additional acknowledgements to James Cornelius, Curator of the Lincoln Collection at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum and to the team at The Lincoln Funeral Train for providing audio. 

About Chris Vallillo

Chris Vallillo is a singer/songwriter and folk musician whose prairie poet style has been  compared to the works of Edgar Lee Masters and Vachel Lindsay.  His natural affinity for American roots music makes the people and places of “unmetropolitan” America come to life in song.  In the 1980s he conducted the Schuyler Arts Folk Music Project, documenting the last of the pre radio generation of musicians along the Illinois River. From 1990 through 1998 he served as the performing host and co-producer of the nationally distributed, award-winning public radio performance series Rural Route 3 where he performed next to (and with) a virtual who’s who of contemporary and traditional folk musicians. His one man show, Abraham Lincoln in Song, received the endorsement of the Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission and the accompanying CD charted at #10 on Billboard’s Bluegrass Album Chart in March of 2008. Chris has twice served as the Illinois Scholar for the Smithsonian Institution’s traveling exhibit on roots music, New Harmonies. His latest project, Oh Freedom! Songs of the Civil Rights Movement, was released on Martin Luther King Day in 2016 and reached #6 on the National Folk Charts.

About Coco Elysses

Coco Elysses, a modern day renaissance woman hails from Robbins, Illinois and is a producer, musician, actress, voice-over artist, screenwriter and poet. Coco completed her MFA in creative writing and was a published poet before graduation. During their second season she was a featured musician in the critically claimed FOX drama Empire. In 2014, Coco was a semi-finalist in Lifetime Television Unscripted Development Pipeline. Coco’s voice can be heard at the Adler Planetarium in the permanent instillation, Skywatchers of Africa. Coco’s voice can also be heard on spots for BET, BlackVoices.com, McDonald’s, Nike, IN and OUT Burger, Saint’s Row video game, EverQuest II and Watchdogs. Coco has performed as an actress in several Chicago theatres.

In 2015 Coco was a featured actress in George E. Lewis’ film, Afterword and in the opera of the same name at The Museum of Contemporary Art. She was also in two exhibits, celebrating the 50th anniversary of the AACM (The DuSable Museum of African American History and the Museum of Contemporary Art. She performed at the Frankfurt, Germany Jazz Festival with Generation Now of the AACM and at the Made in Chicago Jazz Festival in Poznan, Poland with Voice Heard- a collective of female musicians of the AACM. Coco was featured in an episode on Chicago PD. She recently appeared in the Midwest premier of Detroit 67’ at Northlight Theatre directed by Ron O.J. Parsons. She also appeared at Organic Theatre in The Old Settler, where she received a Black Theatre Alliance Award nomination for Best Featured actress in a drama. Coco also appeared in the Chicago Theatre Company, Black Theatre Alliance Award-winning, and Jeff Nominated production of Shakin the Mess Outta Misery. Coco can be seen in the independent film, Severed Ties, available at Blockbuster video. Coco debuted her one woman show entitled, You Can’t Hide, a part of MPAACT’s solo jam series, directed by Ilesha Duncan. Most recently, she has appeared in Northlight Theatre’s Detroit 67’ and Nicole Mitchell’s, JBM- Images Beyond, a theatrical concert.

Coco was also a featured musician in the book, Black Women and Music: More than The Blues, documenting historical female musicians and Jazz- A Documentary featuring several Chicago musician and their unique contributions to this classic American music. Coco performed with the Great Black Music Ensemble of the AACM in Pisa, Italy for the Insolent Noise Festival, at Millennium Park Chicago for the Tribute to Fred Anderson, and George Lewis at the University of Chicago Artspeaks Festival. She has also performed with Renee Baker’s Chicago Modern Orchestra Project. She was a featured artist in Taiko Legacy 8 at the Museum of Contemporary Art with Tatsu Aoki, Tsukasa Taiko and Amy Homma. She also performed with Tatsu Aoki’s Miyumi Project at the Hyde Park Jazz Festival. Coco’s poetry is featured in 99 New Poems: A Contemporary Anthology. She is also a featured essayist in America is...Personal Essays for Social Justice. A few of her noted recordings were in Chile, South America, with Raiza, on their CD, Latin Soul-EMI and Nicole Mitchell’s Africa Rising. Coco is a member of AFTRA-SAG, AEA, AACM and the AFM.

Good Friday, 1865: LINCOLN'S LAST DAY

From Craig Wichman | 58:23

Produced before a live audience at The Museum of Television and Radio (Paley Center for Media) in New York, this original audio docudrama is the recipient of a National Audio Theatre BEST SCRIPT "GRAND PRIZE."

Lincolncrop_small Produced before a live audience at The Museum of Television and Radio (Paley Center for Media) in New York, this original audio docudrama by producer Craig Wichman is the recipient of a National Audio Theatre BEST SCRIPT "GRAND PRIZE." Mr. Wichman plays the 16th President, and Katie Nutt is Mary Todd Lincoln, in a cast that includes John O. Donnell, Emma Palzere, Vito LaBella, Derek Lively, Dan Renkin, Bernadette Fiorella, and John Prave. Directed by Jay Stern (Independent Feature, THE CHANGELING); Music by TONY AWARD-winning Composer Mark Hollmann, with Kathy McDonald and Darren Wilkes; Sound Effects by Sue Zizza and David Shinn (Sue Media); Engineering by Dominick Barbera, with John Kiehl (Soundtrack NY.) And it's all true. ************************************************* "A pleasure... best radio... in some time... subject matter among the most dramatic..." -Arthur Anderson, The Mercury Theatre "A great job... really first rate, just as your last... keep up the wonderful work..." -Leonard Maltin "I suspect that Quicksilver... will be racking up another "Best Production" (Award) for this... splendid radio..." -Max Schmid, WBAI, NY "...Quite fine..." -Andy Trudeau, National Public Radio QUICKSILVER RADIO THEATER has earned awards from the National Federation of Community Broadcasters and the National Audio Theatre, and has performed by invitation at the Museum of Television and Radio (Paley Center for Media) where its shows are in the Collection.

Lincoln and Presidential Campaign Politics

From WUIS | 59:00

A one-hour program drawn from the 2008 Lincoln Legacy Lecture Series, a discussion of the politics during Abraham Lincoln’s presidency relating to the anti-war movement, campaign strategies, and interpretations of the U.S. Constitution.

Legacy_small First, a presentation by Dr. Jennifer Weber, Assistant Professor of History at the University of Kansas-Lawrence and author of Copperheads: The Rise and Fall of Lincoln's Opponents in the North, discussing how President Abraham Lincoln dealt with the Copperheads (the anti-war Democrats) in the elections held during the U.S. Civil war and how Lincoln's leadership qualities were brought to bear to influence dissidents and politics. Then, a presentation by Dr. Silvana Siddali, Associate Professor of History at St. Louis University and author of From Property to Person: Slavery and the Confiscation Acts, 1861-1862, examining how the elections leading up to and during the U.S. Civil War reflected Americans' view of the future of the U.S. Constitution and President Lincoln's power to influence it.

Abraham Lincoln's Portrait (Part 1)

From GW Global Media Institute | Part of the GW Presents Beyond Category series | 57:28

Lincoln scholar Harold Holzer joins host Dick Golden to paint a portrait of America's 16th president through words and the music of Tony Bennett.

Prx_small President Clinton and the United States Congress appointed Harold Holzer, a noted Lincoln expert and author, to be a co-chair of the 2009 Lincoln Bicenntenial Committee.  Mr. Holzer had asked his friend Tony Bennett to paint a portrait of Lincoln for Holzer’s book Why Lincoln Matters.  The painting hangs in Mr. Holzer’s office at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. Dick Golden interviewed Mr. Holzer in his office and asked him to select seven of his favorite Tony Bennett recordings and for two hours the conversation was about Abraham Lincoln and Tony Bennett.

Lincoln’s Team of Rivals

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 01:00:13

Famed historian Doris Kearns Goodwin explores the political genius of “Honest Abe.”

Mike_ptr_thumb_small Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Doris Kearns Goodwin wrote definitive books on Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, Lyndon Johnson, and the Kennedys. This time around she spent ten years learning about Abraham Lincoln--exploring the personality, ambition, and political genius of the enigmatic leader. Goodwin’s new book, Team of Rivals, is an exhaustive biography of “honest Abe”. On this edition of Prime Time Radio, she joins host Mike Cuthbert for a special hour-long conversation about how Lincoln made allies out of enemies to successfully maneuver the nation through its most trying time--the Civil War.

Story of the Century: Lincoln's Assassination

From GW Global Media Institute | Part of the This Just In! series | 53:31

Go back in time to 1865 and re-live the biggest news event of the 19th Century - Abraham Lincoln's assassination. The Newseum's Patty Rhule takes host Sam Litzinger on a tour through the Manhunt exhibit and explains the roles of the telegraph and photography in capturing this most riveting story. Plus, find out why the ghost of John Wilkes Booth is rumored to call the Newseum home.

Story_of_the_century_small Go back in time to 1865 and re-live the biggest news event of the 19th Century - Abraham Lincoln's assassination.  The Newseum's Patty Rhule takes host Sam Litzinger on a tour through the Manhunt exhibit and explains the roles of the telegraph and photography in capturing this most riveting story.  Plus, find out why the ghost of John Wilkes Booth is rumored to call the Newseum home.

Peace Talks Radio: JFK's Turn Towards Peace (59:00 / 54:00)

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 58:57

A conversation with James Douglass, author of "JFK and the Unspeakable: Why He Died and Why It Matters". Douglass makes the case for his theory that the 35th President was the victim of a murder conspiracy and that he died largely because of his peacemaking policies. Offered in either 59:00 or 54:00 versions.

Jfk_small In an in-depth conversation, James Douglass, author of "JFK and the Unspeakable: Why He Died and Why It Matters", spells out his theory that the 35th President was the victim of a murder conspiracy and that he died because of his peacemaking policies. He tracks Kennedy's transformation from a hawkish anti-Communist to someone who helped save the world from nuclear war by establishing back-channel conversations with Soviet premier Nikita Khrushchev. Listeners will also hear much of Kennedy's 1963 speech at American University during which he laid out his vision for world peace, less than 6 months before his murder. Paul Ingles hosts. Language Advisory: A film clip includes the characters saying "Those god-damn Kennedys...." about 18:20 into Part A. If you feel it offensive to your listeners, you may edit it out or contact the producer for a version with that clip stripped out. paul@paulingles.com.

The Peacemaking Chapters of The Roosevelts

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 58:49

On this edition of Peace Talks Radio, what you might call an independent spin-off from Ken Burns 2014 documentary on The Roosevelts. We consider Teddy, Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt through a peace studies lens. First, some details about the effort that won Teddy Roosevelt the 1906 Nobel Peace Prize, then later we explore the war and peace philosophies of Franklin Roosevelt, and the peace and human rights work of Eleanor Roosevelt. NOTE THAT THERE IS ALSO A 29 MINUTE VERSION OF THIS PROGRAM ON PRX.

Roosevelts_small On this edition of Peace Talks Radio, what you might call an independent spin-off from Ken Burns 2014 documentary on The Roosevelts. We consider Teddy, Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt through a peace studies lens.  First, some details about the effort that won Teddy Roosevelt the 1906 Nobel Peace Prize, then later we explore the war and peace philosophies of Franklin Roosevelt, and the peace and human rights work of Eleanor Roosevelt.

Our guests are Charles Doleac, a Portsmouth, New Hampshire attorney and expert on The Portsmouth Peace Treaty of 1905.  Also Dr. Allida Black of the George Washington University in Washington, DC and author or editor of many books on Eleanor Roosevelt.

Lincoln as a Lawmaker

From WUIS | 59:00

Looking at Lincoln’s time as a member of the Illinois legislature.

Img_7219_small This documentary will explore Lincoln's first bid for office, his memorable legislation, his leadership qualities in the legislature and how his days as a member of the General Assembly prepared him for the future. 

Lincoln's Music

From WUIS | 58:57

An exploration of just some of Abraham Lincoln’s favorite music and the music of his lifetime.

Playing
Lincoln's Music
From
WUIS

Happylincolnday_small We’ll explore the music Lincoln loved along with the music he heard throughout his life stretching from childhood … through presidency … and ultimately assassination. We’ll hear some of the musical anecdotes that have been passed down through the years. And we’ll also find out more about period instruments and the origins of mid-nineteenth century popular songs.

Guests include: Chris Vallillo, Erwin Thompson and Todd Cranson.

Barack Obama-The Remix

From Peter Bochan | Part of the Shortcuts series | 54:17

The 2008 journey to the White House, re-mixed in words & music -- introduced by Robert F. Kennedy and featuring Bill Cosby, Oprah Winfrey, John McCain, Chris Rock, Colin Powell, George W. Bush, Sarah Palin, Steve Harvey, Will. i. am, Hillary Clinton, The Pointer Sisters, The Drifters, John Legend, Homer Simpson, Moby, Bruce Springsteen, Ted Kennedy, FDR, and more.

Obamacookie_small Barack Obama - The journey to the White House, reMixed in words & music-introduced by Robert F. Kennedy and featuring Bill Cosby, Oprah Winfrey, John McCain, Chris Rock, Colin Powell, George W. Bush, Sarah Palin, Steve Harvey, Will. i. am, Hillary Clinton, The Pointer Sisters, The Drifters, John Legend, Homer Simpson, Moby, Bruce Springsteen, Ted Kennedy, FDR, The Little Rascals, Kevin So, Branford Marsalis, M.C. Yogi, Martin Luther King Jr, Sam Cooke, John Lewis, Quiet Village, David Letterman, Tim Russert. Katie Couric, Charles Gibson, Matt Damon, Roy Budd, Iron & Wine, Dephazz, Curtis Mayfield & The Impressions, The Edwin Hawkins Singers, various politicians, excited voters...and Barack Obama.

Yes We Can!

How to Observe Presidents' Day, Observed

From The Little Gray Book Lectures | Part of the The Little Gray Book Lectures series | 58:34

Sarah Vowell, John Hodgman and Joshuah Bearman on Presidents' Day, along with a fifteen-piece marching band and a new song about presidents.

PRX EDITOR'S NOTE: Piece refers to Bush as the current president. Preview before licensing for air.

Lgbwig_small "Like Garrison, John is a terrific writer who succeeds in establishing a strong, funny tone for the program immediately. You want to hear what this guy has decided to tell you, in part because you can't quite predict what he'll say next." -- Chris Bannon, Executive Producer, WNYC John Hodgman's Little Gray Book Lectures -- a mix of readings, songs, discussions, cooking demonstrations, appearances by mascots of professional sports teams and occasional contests -- are praised by the LA Times as "increasingly conspicuous." In this lecture, Sarah Vowell reads from her book "Assassination Vacation," in which she fails to connect with a group of tourists in a Massachusetts bed and breakfast on the subject of Presidential assassinations. Welshman Jon Langford (The Mekons) accompanies her on vocals and guitar. Joshuah Bearman lectures on the subject of Bigfoot and his alleged encounters with President Theodore Roosevelt, and host John Hodgman recounts with love George Washington's wise and kind decision to be our President only twice. As with every Little Gray Book Lecture, Jonathan Coulton will sing an original song, this one about all forty-three presidents, accompanied by a fifteen-person marching band playing "Hail to the Chief."


Half-Hour (24:00-30:00)

Lincoln and Humor

From WUIS | 29:00

How Abraham Lincoln discovered humor and how jokes and tall tales helped him to make a point.

Playing
Lincoln and Humor
From
WUIS

Abewithguitar_small Interviews with two Lincoln experts on how Abraham Lincoln discovered how he could use tall tales and jokes to make a point. And he used the technique… not only in political debates… but also in the courtroom. And Lincoln gathered jokes and stories and re-worked them or embellished the details to fit to situation at hand. Paul Zall wrote a book… “Abe Lincoln Laughing”… which is a compilation of several stories and jokes and sources for them. The other expert… James Cornelius is curator of the Lincoln Collection at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum. The program also includes a short interview with a Lincoln impersonator… Richard “Fritz” Klein… who talks about his 30 years experience in playing Lincoln. Klein also tells a handful of jokes/stories to set the tone of the program.

The Roosevelts Through a Peace Studies Lens

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Half Hour Episodes series | 29:01

On this edition of Peace Talks Radio, what you might call an independent spin-off from Ken Burns 2014 documentary on The Roosevelts. We consider Teddy, Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt through a peace studies lens. First, some details about the effort that won Teddy Roosevelt the 1906 Nobel Peace Prize, then later we explore the war and peace philosophies of Franklin Roosevelt, and the peace and human rights work of Eleanor Roosevelt. NOTE THAT THERE IS ALSO A 59/54 MINUTE VERSION OF THIS ONE PRX.

Teddy_small On this edition of Peace Talks Radio, what you might call an independent spin-off from Ken Burns 2014 documentary on The Roosevelts. We consider Teddy, Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt through a peace studies lens.  First, some details about the effort that won Teddy Roosevelt the 1906 Nobel Peace Prize, then later we explore the war and peace philosophies of Franklin Roosevelt, and the peace and human rights work of Eleanor Roosevelt.

Our guests are Charles Doleac, a Portsmouth, New Hampshire attorney and expert on The Portsmouth Peace Treaty of 1905.  Also Dr. Allida Black of the George Washington University in Washington, DC and author or editor of many books on Eleanor Roosevelt.

JFK's Turn Towards Peace (Peace Talks Radio) [29:00]

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | 29:01

A conversation with James Douglass, author of "JFK and the Unspeakable: Why He Died and Why It Matters". Douglass makes the case for his theory that the 35th President was the victim of a murder conspiracy and that he died largely because of his peacemaking policies. JFK's "Peace Speech" just months before his assassination is featured.

Jfk_medium_small In an in-depth conversation, James Douglass, author of "JFK and the Unspeakable: Why He Died and Why It Matters", spells out his theory that the 35th President was the victim of a murder conspiracy and that he died because of his peacemaking policies. He tracks Kennedy's transformation from a hawkish anti-Communist to someone who helped save the world from nuclear war by establishing back-channel conversations with Soviet premier Nikita Khrushchev. Listeners will also hear much of Kennedy's 1963 speech at American University during which he laid out his vision for world peace, less than 6 months before his murder. Paul Ingles hosts.


Cutaways (5:00-8:59)

Wilson on Wilson

From Wilson Sayre | 03:47

Ever wonder what it's like to be related to a president? Reporter Wilson Sayre brings us a personal story about how she grappled with her presidential history.

Default-piece-image-2 I don’t remember being told Woodrow Wilson was my great-great-grandfather. It was a fact I grew up with. A picture of my newborn grandfather, the last child ever born in the White House, being gazed at by mighty Woodrow, hung in the staircase of my parents’ home.

A Woodrow Wilson campaign poster hung in teh stairwell of my childhood home. From it, he looked through his iconic pince-nez glasses and over his long, angular nose at me, his namesake. But the person I was named after was, in many ways, a mystery.

This is how I unpacked that mystery.

"Lady Bird Johnson: Legacy of a First Lady" Module #1

From Joe Bevilacqua | Part of the "Lady Bird Johnson: Legacy of a First Lady" Modules series | 05:31

Joe Bevilacqua is releasing short module versions of taken from his award winning documentary. The modules combine never-before-released archive audio, gleaned from thousands of hours of recordings housed at the Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum, period news broadcasts, private conversations with Lyndon Baines Johnson, and the words of Lady Bird Johnson from an interview that has never before been released to the public. Check out the whole series

Mediumladybirdpainting_small The 2008 Presidential election marks the first time a woman, Hillary Clinton is being seriously considered. Lady Bird Johnson was a pioneer First Lady who forged the way for this historic election. With this in mind, Joe Bevilacqua is releasing short module versions of taken from his award winning documentary. The first details Mrs. Johnson's early years. The modules combine never-before-released archive audio, gleaned from thousands of hours of recordings housed at the Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum, period news broadcasts, private conversations with Lyndon Baines Johnson, and the words of Lady Bird Johnson from an interview that has never before been released to the public. If you would like to air the full one hour documentary, go to: http://www.prx.org/pieces/364 Bevilacqua spent nearly five months listening to the rare tapes and traveled to Washington, D.C. to interview Mrs. Johnson's colleagues and friends. The program features Lyndon Johnson Administration staffers Liz Carpenter, Bess Abell, and Nash Castro, Washington Post owner Katherine Graham, Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum Director Harry Middleton, Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center Director Robert Glass Breunig; Lady Bird biographer Jan Jarboe Russell, and First Ladies Betty Ford and Barbara Bush. Other voices heard on the program include Kirk Douglas and Helen Hayes reading from LBJ and Lady Bird's love letters. The production was produced in association with KUT Radio in Austin, TX, and overseen by a panel of scholars and experts including Lewis Gould, retired University of Texas at Austin Professor of History; Walt Rostow, UT Professor Emeritus, Elspeth Rostow, former dean of the UT LBJ School of Public Affairs; Carl Anthony, Washington, D.C. historian; and Don Carleton, director, The Center for American History at UT. ***** Informational, Inspiring This is an excellent, uplifting journey through Lady Bird Johnson's life, and her growth and transition to first lady under tragic conditions. It's wonderful to hear her voice, rendered here in excerpts from interviews she's given and speeches she's made. It is especially poignant to hear a portion of her first audio diary entry, made the day after JFK's assassination. Nuanced choices of music are a production plus, but the strength is in the spoken word. Wisely chosen excerpts create a rich experience. The hour contains a wide range of voices, from historians to those who worked with her or know her, and they pinpoint her influence on LBJ, and on the capital, and the nation -- particularly in the areas of environment, race, and education. She truly is a force for good. (Reviewer) (Editorial Board) Transom Editors , Atlantic Public Media December 4, 2003

Art In Camelot (Series)

Produced by ARTSEDGE

A two-part series for the anniversary of the swearing-in of John F. Kennedy, looking at the incredible impact the Kennedy administration had on the arts.

Most recent piece in this series:

Concerts at the White House

From ARTSEDGE | Part of the Art In Camelot series | 08:14

Pablo_and_marta_casals_and_kennedy_small This story is narrated by Richard Dreyfuss.  Today we consider big-name celebrity concerts broadcast from the White House to be routine.  It all started during the Kennedy Administration.  More concerts, ballets and operas were staged inside the White House for President and Mrs. Kennedy than ever had been before or ever have been since.


Drop-Ins (2:00-4:59)

President's Day - Time for a Female in the White House?

From KSFR | Part of the Equal Time with Martha Burk series | 02:30

In the all the years we've celebrated President's Day, we've never honored a female president, because we've never had one. It's not that women haven't tried, starting with Victoria Woodhull in 1870.

Podcastphoto_small Twelve  women have run for president of the United States since 1870.  Is it time for one to win? 2016 might be our lucky number.