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Playlist: Mother's Day

Compiled By: PRX Editors

 Credit: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/85966598@N00/109070022/">Patrick Q</a>
Image by: Patrick Q 
Curated Playlist

Mother's Day is May 14.

Below are picks chosen by PRX editorial staff. You can see all Mother's Day radio by using our search.

Hour (49:00-1:00:00)

Mother's Day Special 2017

From The Moth | Part of the Moth Radio Hour Specials series | 53:58

A special edition of The Moth Radio Hour dedicated to Mothers. A woman who has never wanted children suddenly questions her choice, a little girl gets angry at her mother and runs away from home, a son struggles at his mother's deathbed, and a man finds a mother's love in unconventional ways. Hosted by The Moth Radio Hour Producer, Jay Allison (with help from his mom). The Moth Radio Hour is produced by The Moth and Jay Allison of Atlantic Public Media. Hosted by The Moth Radio Hour Producer, Jay Allison.

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Ophira Eisenberg confronts her fertility during a crisis.

Terry Wolfisch Cole wants preferential treatment as the oldest sister.

Andy Christie sends off his mother with a melody.

Samuel Lewis Lee is looked after by a mother's love.

Mothering

From WHYY | Part of the The Pulse Specials series | 50:29

Giving birth, Giving support. Being there. Being exhausted. To mark Mother’s Day, “The Pulse” reflects on some of the ways humans — and other species — juggle fierce love and the never-ending demands of childcare.

Playing
Mothering
From
WHYY

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PROGRAM DETAILS:

Mothering
Giving birth. Giving support. Being there. Being exhausted. To mark Mother’s Day, “The Pulse” reflects on some of the ways humans — and other species — juggle fierce love and the never-ending demands of childcare.
 
America doesn’t have enough OBGYNs
Shawnee Baker was in labor. Her husband was trying his best to get his wife to the hospital in time. As they bumped along country roads, Shawnee imagined giving birth on the side of the highway. If you’re a pregnant woman in rural Susquehanna, Pennsylvania, that’s your reality. There’s one obstetrician and he only comes to town three times a month. Elizabeth Fiedler hung out with him and a waiting room full of pregnant women.
 
Freeloading bird forces others to raise her hatchlings
The brown-headed cowbird may be one of the most hated birds in the animal kingdom. The cowbird is a brood parasite: she lays her eggs in the nest of another bird, and then ‘muscles’ that mama bird into fostering her cowbird nestling. Paige Pfleger narrates the cutthroat drama happening in the treetops.
4 minutes
 
Dads are wired to 'mother' too
The role of "caregiver" in parenting is often synonymous with mom. But biology tells a different story about the important role fathers play. Fathers don't just function as male mothers; they provide a kind of caregiving that's unique to dads. But, society's old-fashioned ideas about parenting roles might be making it more difficult for dads to do their jobs. Max Green does ‘daddy duty’ with a father in Illinois.
 
A zygote writes an apology letter to mom
From single-cell zygote to nutrient sucking embryo, Rebecca Helm charts the journey of a growing fetus in its host uterus. Helm is a biologist and it’s her special, handmade Mother’s Day card to her mom.
3 minutes
 
The ‘baby penalty’ often sidelines women scientists
On the way to the hospital to deliver her first daughter, bioengineer Nancy Pleshko stopped by FedEx to drop off a grant application. “That’s your life when you’re a scientist in academia,” she says. Pleshko went on to lead a science lab, but an inflexible work culture in science leads some women to find other careers or to adjust their family planning goals. Alan Yu speaks with young scientist mom who got off the tenure track to take an industry job.
6 minutes
 
Interviews with host Maiken Scott
 
Miscarriage: a common experience we don’t talk about much
OB-GYN Courtney Schreiber runs a University of Pennsylvania program for newly pregnant women and women who have experienced miscarriage. One in four pregnancies ends in miscarriage, and Schrieber says the health system should do a better job preparing women for that possibility — and caring for them when it happens.
 
The interview follows a first-person story from 31-year-old Carolina Garzon. Today she’s mom to smiling five-month-old Emma, but her first try at motherhood ended in a miscarriage. Garzon gave Alex Stern a tour of the wildflower garden she planted to remember her first pregnancy.
3 minutes
 
Mother dolphins sing to their babies in the womb
While studying Bella the bottlenose dolphin and her calf Mira, researcher Audra Ames documented Bella’s ‘signature whistle.’ Dolphins vocalize the whistle before and after giving birth to imprint the sound on their babies. Ames is based at the Marine Mammal Behavior and Cognition Lab at the University of Southern Mississippi.
 
Physics is a mother
If you struggled in your high school physics class, you might not have warm feelings about the study of atoms and quarks. But physics has been called the “mother of all sciences,” because it explains the fundamental laws that govern nature, and, without it, other branches couldn’t exist. Science writer Jennifer Ouellette overcame her fear of physics, made a career writing about it,  and married a physicist.

Mother and Son: Two Plays by Daniel Reitz and David Cale

From Playing on Air | Part of the Playing on Air Full Length Episodes series | 53:00

Jane Kaczmarek ("Malcolm in the Middle") stars in the touching and humorous first piece, Napoleon in Exile, directed by Marsha Mason (four time Academy Award Nominee). Ms.Kaczmarek plays a single mother having a sometimes humorous sometimes exasperating conversation with her young adult son with ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder). The second short features James Lecesne, the energetic and multi-talented creator of the Academy Award winning short film, Trevor. He plays the roles of both mother and son in a play about an adult son temporarily moving back home after his divorce and discovering his mother is not what she used to be. Lecesne is a wonder. Conversation with artists follows both plays.

S_63336_1419155739_jane_kaczmarek_1236211564_0_small Two short plays. NAPOLEON IN EXILE features Jane Kaczmarek of Malcolm in the Middle and is directed by four time Academy Award Nominee, and two time Golden Globe winner Marsha Mason. Kaczmarek stars as a single mother having a funny but exasperating conversation with her young adult son, who has ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) played by up-and-coming actor Will Dagger. ELIZABETH features James Lecesne, the eneregetic and multi-talented creator of the Academy Award winning Trevor and New York Times Critic's Pick The Absolute Brightness of Leonard Pelkey. He plays the roles of both mother and son in a play about an adult son temporarily moving back home after his divorce and discovering his mother is not the woman she used to be. Lecesne is a wonder.

Napoleon in Exile features Will Dagger and Jane Kaczmarek, was written by Daniel Reitz, and is directed by Marsha Mason (The Good-bye Girl, Cinderella Liberty, Chapter Two). Elizabeth features James Lecesne in both roles and was written by David Cale. Original music for both plays composed by Tom Kochan. Conversation with artists follows each short.

BIRTH

From Thin Air Media | 56:28

A one-hour public radio documentary about the practices and perceptions of birth in America.

Playing
BIRTH
From
Thin Air Media

Allbelly_small BIRTH is a one-hour public radio and audio documentary about the practices and perceptions of birth in America. Starting with early perceptions, we move through the process of birth beginning before labor, continuing during labor, and following the actual event. With a multiplicity of voices woven with sound we examine the process of birth from an emotional, physical and philosophical perspective. As we move back and forth through time and from person to person, we discover how stories from our lives, history, media, and the medical institution enter into the culmination of the actual birthing process. Birth is a rite of passage through which all human beings pass. Is it the same as it ever was? Why do some women feel deeply empowered by their birth experiences and others feel stripped of their motherhood? Where do our expectations about how we give birth come from, and how do they play out when we approach the event? What is the baby's experience? And what about the father's role? Turn on the television or watch a movie and you're likely to see birth portrayed as an emergency medical procedure. Is this a true depiction of what happens? Perhaps, and yet there are many ways in which to approach the experience. Above all else, we are biologically predisposed to be interested in this topic. Quite simply, when it comes to birth everyone can relate.

Mama Said! (REWORKED)

From Garrett Stack | Part of the American Jukebox ® series | 01:56:44

All Types of Pop, Rock and Soul Songs With Mama

Mama_said_small American Jukebox 222: It's the Mama Said edition of American Jukebox. Hundreds of songs refer to Mama, mother, and Ma. Here are about 30 from the '50s, '60s and '70s. 

Love Syndrome

From Israel Story | 54:00

Israel Story's Mother's Day Special is the most unusual, unpredictable and touching tale you've heard in a while.

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'Israel Story' is one of the most popular national radio shows in Israel. Many call it the local 'This American Life.' In their Mother's Day special, they bring the hour-long story of Chaya Ben Baruch. 
Chaya grew up as Enid, in a traditional Jewish family in Far Rockaway, N.Y. Midway through college, she left that world behind to study sea otters in Fairbanks, Alaska.
Fast-forward a decade: Enid is now married to a nice Catholic salmon fisher named Stan. She’s just given birth to her sixth child, and discovers he has Down syndrome. Many parents in her position would be devastated. Some might place their baby in an institution, or put them up for adoption. For Enid, the birth of Angkor started her and her family on an incredible journey—to Tzfat, Israel, and from there to court rooms, hospitals, ultra-Orthodox yeshivas, and wedding halls, all so she could do right by her child and the other special-needs children she picked up along the way.

8: Izzy Chan & Laura Pilz, The Tectonic Shift in Gender Roles

From KALW | Part of the Inflection Point with Lauren Schiller series | 53:59

Just in time for mother's day: We all know the stereotypes, but the traditional family roles have shifted. Almost half of women are now the primary breadwinners. On this episode, find out how women--and men--moms and dads, are handling this tectonic change.

Izzy_chan_small We all know the stereotypes, but the traditional family roles have shifted. Almost half of women are now the primary breadwinners. On this episode, find out how women--and men--are handling this tectonic change.With Izzy Chan, director of The Big Flip and Laura Pilz of Merrill Lynch.

HOB Radio: Mother's Day

From Ben Manilla | Part of the House of Blues Radio Hour series | 59:01

A tribute to women of the blues.

Minnie2_small The House of Blues Radio Hour is a weekly syndicated program hosted by Elwood Blues (a.k.a. Dan Aykroyd).  In this episode, Elwood sits down with three contemporary Blues mamas; actress/singer Sally Kellerman, acoustic master Rory Block, and Mississippi stalwart Eden Brent to talk about their recent projects.  Includes music by Bonnie Raitt, Etta James, Marcia Ball and more.

The 1871 Mother's Day Proclamation for Peace (Peace Talks Radio) [59:00/54:00]

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 59:00

The story of Julia Ward Howe's 1871 Proclamation for Peace and her call for a universal Mother's Day to promote peace and disarmament, plus the author of a book called "Long Time Passing: Mothers Talk About War and Terror."

Julia-ward-howe-9345293-1-402_small The story of Julia Ward Howe's 1871 Proclamation for Peace and her call for a universal Mother's Day to promote peace and disarmament.  Host Carol Boss talks with Kate Stickley, a direct descendent of Howe, and Jane Smith Bernhardt, an actor who portrays Howe onstage.  Plus conversation with Susan Galleymore, author of a book called "Long Time Passing: Mothers Talk About War and Terror."

Someone To Watch Over Me

From Playing on Air | Part of the Playing on Air Full Length Episodes series | 53:00

Playing on Air records audio versions of 10-20 minutes contemporary stage plays for radio broadcast and online distribution. In "West of Stupid", a young man takes his mother to Italy, where she makes a surprising announcement. In "Relative Strangers", a young woman thinks she has found a new mother on a flight to South Carolina.

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Two short plays. In West of Stupid, a teacher, vacationing with her adult son, falls for Rome and won’t go home. In the comic Relative Strangers, on a flight to South Carolina, a young woman selects a surrogate mother.  Cusi Cram's West of Stupid with Alfredo Narciso, J. Smith-Cameron (Tony); and Sheri Wilner's Relative Strangers with Julie Halston ("Sex and the City"), Michael Keck, Debra Monk (multiple Tonys, Emmys), Merritt Wever (Emmy Award for “Nurse Jackie”). Interview with playwrights Cusi Cram and Sheri Wilner follow their play.


 

Getting Raised (Hour long program with 5 or 3 min. newshole)

From KUOW | Part of the Curated Youth Radio Programs from KUOW and Generation PRX series | 55:00

Getting raised isn't easy. This hour, we hear stories from those who know. Teenagers explain how to deal with in-your-face parents, abusive parents, absent parents and becoming a parent when you're still in high school.

070101raised_small Getting raised isn't easy. This hour, we hear stories from those who know. Teenagers explain how to deal with in-your-face parents, abusive parents, absent parents and becoming a parent when you're still in high school. KUOW and the Public Radio Exchange scoured the country for the best radio stories created by producers under twenty. One teen tells us about folks who won't let their kid eat watermelon unsupervised, because they're afraid she'll choke on the seeds. Another young woman got kicked out of her mom's house when she was only eleven years old. She had to raise herself fast, and on the streets. We'll also hear some juicy secrets (you know that bullet hole in the basement?), and eavesdrop on conversations it's hard to have, at any age. PRODUCER: Jenny Asarnow HOST: Jennol Jenkins with her mom, Deb Jenkins WEB PRODUCER: Jenna Montgomery PRX PRODUCTION HELP: Jones Franzel

Breastfeeding Beyond Infancy

From Vanessa Lowe | 01:00:00

An hour-long radio documentary, featuring the voices of fourteen women who have breastfed their children between one and four years. Some of the major topics covered include dealing with judgment and criticism, public nursing, benefits and challenges, changes in perception, weaning, nursing while working, and support. Also featured is commentary from Dr. Nigel Rollins, of the World Health Organization, Dr. Jay Gordon, a Fellow of the American Association of Pediatrics, and Dr. Katherine Dettwyler, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Delaware.

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Extended breastfeeding (breastfeeding past one year) is arguably among the most heated and controversial child rearing choices, occupying an emotionally fraught landscape along with co-sleeping, sleep training and discipline.  The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends breastfeeding exclusively for 6 months, and then for at least a year, or as long as is mutually desirable.  The World Health Organization recommends that a mother breastfeed her child for at least two years.  The recommendations are based on countless studies showing significant health benefits of breastfeeding for babies and children, as well as for mothers.  However, science and societal views don't always align.

Because of the potential for judgment about the basic merits of their parenting, many mothers keep quiet about the joys, frustrations, challenges, and struggles of nursing their kids past babyhood.  This can lead to mothers feeling isolated and unsupported.  It is this lack of support, in addition to the fear of public criticism that leads many mothers to wean before they and their children are ready.  

The goal of this radio documentary is to stimulate dialogue about breastfeeding past one year in the United States.  In addition, it aims to educate mothers, family members, and health care practitioners about the benefits and challenges of breastfeeding past infancy.  Finally, the piece aims to give voice to breastfeeding mothers.  

"Breastfeeding Beyond Infancy" was produced by Vanessa Lowe, whose background includes a doctorate in Clinical Psychology, as well as four years as host of a radio show on KWMR, a community radio station in Point Reyes Station, CA.  She is a musician and songwriter, and has released four records, with a fifth due for release in 2011.  She is the mother of a five-year-old son.  

Kent Sparling, a Bay Area composer, sound designer and re-recording mixer associated with George Lucas' Skywalker Sound, completed the final editing and mixing of "Breastfeeding Beyond Infancy".   

Parent and Child

From Canadian Broadcasting Corporation | Part of the CBC Radio's Outfront series | 53:29

CBC Radio's Outfront presents four stories about children and parents.

Flowers_logo-_final_small The Cause of Thunder produced by Stewart Young
A glimpse into the remarkable world of Eliot Grant...a five year old from Prospect, Nova Scotia with Asperger's Syndrome, a form of autism. Eliot's mother, Carla, shares the joys and frustration of living with her brilliant, but challenging son. This documentary won the Grand Award at the New York Festivals in 2006.

Flanking on the Far Day produced by Kent Hoffman

Kelly McCarthy has always known the significance of her Dad's yearly ritual of preparing his Harley Davidson motorcycle for the first ride of Spring. But this year the ritual means even more.

Her Dad had a heart attack in the winter and his recovery has focused on just one thing: getting back on his Harley. And this time Kelly is along for the ride.


Childstar Goes to Hollywood produced by Geoff Siskind
For nine year old Niamph Wilson, just being cast as one of the leads in a movie of the week was thrilling. But when she found out that she had been nominated for a Young Artist's Award for that same role, her thrill suddenly ballooned into an exciting mother/daughter adventure all the way down to Hollywood, California. Follow Niamph and Leslie's adventure as they travel down to Tinseltown with hopes of coming home with the gold.

No Use Worrying About It produced by Marie Wadden & Neil Sandell
Cherie Wheeler lives in Corner Brook, Newfoundland. Her Dad is a reservist in Afghanistan. In this audio diary, she says she knows worrying about him isn't going to do her any good. But, then, she says, how can you not?

Mom's Good Move Special

From Long Haul Productions | 58:59

In the year 2000, Peg Collison left the town of San Mateo, California - where she'd been living for almost 35 years - and moved two hours away into a newly built retirement community in Davis, California. Peg's son, Dan, gave his Mom a tape recorder and asked her document her transition. From Dan and Peg Collison and Long Haul Productions.

Pegforsalesm_small Whether they are forced to, or whether they plan to, each year more and more seniors move into retirement homes. In the year 2000, Peg Collison was one of them. Peg left the town of San Mateo, California - where she'd been living for almost 35 years - and moved two hours away into a newly built retirement community in Davis, California. These transitions are often difficult not just for the person who's actually moving but for family members and for friends left behind. Peg's son, Dan, gave his Mom a tape recorder and asked her document her transition. Together, Peg and Dan produced a three-part series in 2000 on Peg's move and what it meant to her and her family. In 2005, Dan updated Peg's situation. This documentary is a hour-long special combining all four stories.

Dina's Diary: Journey of a Cancer Survivor

From Capital Public Radio | 59:03

This intimate, award-winning audio diary documents a young mother's year-long battle with breast cancer.

Dina_small Two weeks before Thanksgiving Day 2005, Dina Howard was diagnosed with breast cancer. Over the ensuing months, the 39-year-old mother of two faced agonizing decisions about surgery, chemotherapy and radiation. At the time of her diagnosis, Dina, a former actress and arts administrator, was starting work as a freelance arts reporter for public radio station KXJZ in Sacramento. Despite having no radio experience, she had reporter-like instincts and lots of enthusiasm. But after she got the devastating news, her new vocation would have to wait. Or would it? While still dealing with the shock of the diagnosis, Dina had an idea: maybe she should keep the equipment she borrowed from the station and document her own battle with cancer. It would give her a task to focus on, she reasoned. And maybe the finished product would be helpful to others someday. And so, for one year between Thanksgivings, Dina kept an audio diary. But she didn't just record end-of-the-day reflections about her ordeal. She recorded her raw reactions during the most crucial moments of treatment: while she was in the pre-op waiting room before mastectomy surgery, in the infusion lounge during chemotherapy, and during radiation treatments with a giant machine hovering overhead. "Dina's Diary" is a powerful and emotional distillation of those experiences. It includes other important voices as well: Dina's family and friends, her doctors and nurses, even the owner of a wig shop she visited. Since its original airing on KXJZ in December, 2006, "Dina's Diary" has won awards from AP, PRNDI and PRPD. More importantly it has touched the lives of a great many listeners who have gone through, are going through, or will soon be starting cancer treatment. Here are a few of their comments: "I listened to Dina's Diary in the car last week and had to pull over in the rain to hear the whole thing. And I was crying, because it was so fresh in my memory. 2006 was my cancer year... Thank you Dina for taking this thing out of its private, polite world and giving it a voice. The emotions are overwhelming and we don't have a good way to handle them although family and friends are the most wonderful blessing of all." "My wife has finished 4 of 8 chemos by Christmas. We also read the comic-style book 'Cancer-Vixen' -Both your diary and that book have given us the roadmap that the doctors don't seem to have laid out well. She has a team of doctors, each a specialist in their part of the treatment, and so trying to get a roadmap is like pulling teeth. Only the cancer-victors who've been through can speak to our need, Thank you, thank you, thank you." "Listening to Dina's Diary tonight was the most powerful story I have ever heard on talk radio. It stopped me in my tracks. I am a 31 year old mother of two small children. As I cooked dinner and listened to Dina's story, tears streamed down my face. What would I do if I were diagnosed with breast cancer? My husband sat down and listened as well. Dina's words were honest and real. You could feel her fear. You could feel her will to survive. Thank you Dina for revealing the reality of such a frightening situation. I admire her determination to stay strong and to never give up. How beautiful to come out of this with humility and a renewed love for life."

And They Never Came Back: Life After Our Parents Have Died

From melanie berzon | 57:03

In this award winning documentary, producer Melanie Berzon chronicles five women whose parents died at an early age. Share in their laughter and their tears, their anger and their loss.

Default-piece-image-0 In this award winning documentary, producer Melanie Berzon chronicles five women whose parents died at an early age. Share in their laughter and their tears, their anger and their loss. Learn about the grief process as you've never heard it before. A unique addition to your Mother's Day and/or Father's Day programming! Used by grief counselors and therapists nationwide.

BEAT LATINO 020: Celebrating el Dia de la Madre - Mother's Day

From Catalina Maria Johnson | 59:02

Tunes from throughout Latin America and Latino USA for Mother's Day.

Beatlatino-mother_sday2_small Beat Latino, hosted and produced by Catalina Maria Johnson, celebrates in every hour a different facet of the extraordinary diversity of the Latin/Latino musical universe. Like everything else that's important in Latin&Latino culture, Mothers have a special niche in the music. There's songs about a mother's special love, leaving Mom to go elsewhere, returning to Mom and one's hometown, following Mom's advice, and the consequences of not following it! So, join us in celebrating Mother's Day Latin&Latino style, with lots of singing and dancing! This hour of Beat Latino presents songs from all over Latin America, and Spain as well as the southern and Western U.S.A. Hosted in both Spanish and English, so all can enjoy and move to the special beat of the Dia de la Madre. Broadcasts nicely for Mother's Day!

"The Cartoon Carnival Mother's Day Special"

From Joe Bevilacqua | Part of the Cartoon Carnival with Joe Bev. series | 53:46

Guest co-hosted by Joe Bev's mom, Joan Bevilacqua, and his mother-in-law, Virginia Kellogg, presenting rare and classic audio and music about mothers from Mel Blanc, Bea Benaderet, Bob Clampett, Walt Disney, Mother Goose, Al Jolson, Max Fleischer, Mae Questal, Paul Whiteman, and Smiley Burnette.

Horton01_small "The Cartoon Carnival Mother's Day Special" - guest co-hosted by Joe Bev's mom, Joan Bevilacqua, and his mother-in-law, Virginia Kellogg, presenting classic and rare cartoon audio related to mothers, eggs, mothers on eggs, chickens on eggs, mother chickens on eggs, elephants on eggs, including the Warner Brothers cartoons "An Egg Scrambled" (1950) (voiced by Mel Blanc and Bea Benaderet) and Bob Clampett's version "Horton Hatches the Egg" by Dr. Suess (1942), the Walter Lantz cartoon "Mother Goose on the Loose" (1942), Walt Disney's "Mother Goose Goes Hollywood" (1938) and "The Truth About Mother Goose" (1957),  Max Fleischer's "The Kids in the Shoe," featuring the voice of Olive Oyl herself, Mae Questal and Smiley Burnette of Gene Autry fame singing "Mama Don't 'Low" (1935), plus Al Jolson singing "My Mammy" (1946) and "Mutiny in the Nursery" by The Paul Whiteman Orchestra (1938).

The first person to email joebev@joebev.com with most of the celebrity impressions you hear on this show wins a FREE four volume CD set of Daws Butler's "Uncle Dunkle and Dunkle" fractured fables!

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Joe Bevilacqua (Joe Bev.) began hosted his new "Cartoon Carnival" radio show for Shokus Internet Radio on Labor Day 2009, becoming an instant hit and rising to become the 2nd most listened to program on the network. The show is averaging 300 to 500 listeners, and currently has 532 fans on its Facebook page.

As the protege of cartoon voice legend Daws Butler (Yogi Bear), the veteran award-winning broadcaster (NPR, XM Radio) is no stranger to the cartoon world. Joe Bev even co-authored his mentor's authorized biography, "Daws Butler, Characters Actor," available at BearManorMedia.com.

Most recently, Bevilacqua has produced a number of audio books for BearManorAudio.com, including Daws Butler's UNCLE DUNKLE AND DONNIE Fractured Fables -- with Bevilacqua performing all 97 different characters, IT'S THAT TIME AGAIN: THE NEW STORIES OF OLD TIME RADIO -- fully produced with sound effects and music and performed entirely by Bevilacqua & his wife Lorie Kellogg, THE LAUGH MAKERS: A Behind-The-Scenes Tribute To Bob Hope'sIncredible Gag Writers -- written and read by Bob Mills with preface by Gary Owens, and SON OF HARPO SPEAKS! A Family Portrait -- written, scored and read by Bill Marx. Available at www.BearManorAudio.com.

From Mel Blanc to June Foray, from Disney to Hanna-Barbera, "Cartoon Carnival" is a lively hour of rare and classic cartoon audio, children's records, cartoon music, and sound effects, new radio cartoons, old time radio in a cartoon veign, interviews and mini-documentaries about the wonderful world of animation.

The series is currently airing on a number of stations:

CARTOON CARNIVAL with Joe Bev.
"The first radio cartoon show ever!"
Listen DAILY at 3 PM (PT) at http://www.shokusradio.com
Fridays at 6 PM (PT) on KITC, 106.5 FM, Gilchrist, Oregon
and at http://kitcfm.com
Sundays at 6 PM (PT) and Mondays at 2 PM (PT) http://www.omnimedianetworks.org
ANYTIME at http://www.prx.org/series/31365-cartoon-carnival-with-joe-bev

--- Guest host bios:

Virgina Kellogg was born in Browning, MO and was raised in Kansas City, KS. She taught cosmetology right out of high school and after meeting Everett Kellogg in the mid '50s married and co-ran their own salon for over 30 years in the Brookside neighborhood of Kansas City, MO. Coinciding hairdressing, Virgina was also the Secretary for the Brookside Merchants Association for over 12 years and began the neighborhoods annual St. Patrick's day parade and Brookside Arts Fair. She enjoyed promoting and rubbing elbows with Kansas Cities elected officials and real estate moguls. Since retiring the Brookside Art Fair has named their highest art prize in her name. Virgina paints pottery and shows regularly in the "Arts on the Hill" exhibit in Kansas City, MO. Virginia is happily retired with her husband Everett, two dogs and a cat in Lenexa, KS and is frequently seen at her grandson's basketball games.


Joan Bevilacqua (nee Kvidahl) was born in Harrison, New Jersey, A daughter of Norwegian and Austrian parents, Joan is the youngest of 4 children. Joan moved to Newark, NJ when she was 8yrs old, and like many teenagers in the 1940’s, formed the group the “Tiffanettes” with her girlfriends. They 62 years later they remain close friends.

As a young woman, Joan taught Catechism classes, volunteered with the Jerry Lewis Telethon, and as was a member of the Little Theater Group “Show Shop” spent some time at the “Woodstock Summer Theater”.

In the late 50’s, Joan married Joseph Bevilacqua, and they moved to Iselin, New Jersey, with their 2 children in 1965. While her children were small, Joan volunteered at the St. Cecelia’s Gift Shop, St. Cecelia’s Iselin Fair, and St. Thomas Aquinas Bingo. During this time Joan was an avid bowler, and also coached Youth Bowlers.

Joan was employed with NJ Bell Telephone for 5 years, Eastern Airlines for 18 years, and Elizabethtown Gas Company for 5 years. While employed at Eastern Airlines, Joan and her daughter joined 3 other women to win their National Bowling Championship.

Since retiring, Joan has volunteered with NJ AARP, served on the Middlesex County Leadership Council, was the Secretary of the Iselin Seniors Association, and spent time reading to Nursery School Children. Joan continues to volunteer at the Woodbridge Office on Aging.

Joan’s husband passed away in 1987. She resides with her daughter, Caryn, in Iselin, New Jersey. They have 2 dogs and 2 cats. Joseph, her oldest child, is the producer and creator of this special, while Caryn has worked in the airline industry for over 25 years. Joan hobbies include crocheting, reading, computer games, and an occasional trip to Atlantic City.

# # #

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As the protege of cartoon voice legend Daws Butler (Yogi Bear), Joe Bevilacqua (Joe Bev.), the veteran award-winning broadcaster (NPR, XM Radio) is no stranger to the cartoon world. Joe Bev even co-authored his mentor's authorized biography, "Daws Butler, Characters Actor", available at BearManorMedia.Com.

From Mel Blanc to June Foray, from Disney to Hanna-Barbera, "Cartoon Carnival" is a lively hour of rare and classic cartoon audio, children's records, cartoon music and sound effects, new radio cartoons, interviews and mini-documentaries about the wonderful world of animation.

A generic promo is attached.

Available as a weekly series and/or stand-alone holiday specials, CARTOON CARNIVAL is a huge HIT with PDs and audiences at the following stations:

Weekly series airing:

1) ONLINE DAILY at 3 PM (PT) Shokus Internet Radio
http://www.shokusradio.com

2) Omni Media Networks:
SUNDAYS at 6 PM (PT) all channels(Classic Car Gold, the Stream, the Beyond Channel, and Hound Dog) and AM 1610 FM 89.3, Albany, OR
MONDAYS at 2 PM and 1 PM and TUESDAYS at 6 AM (PT) Golden Hours Radio Network
THURSDAYS, 3 PM (PT) The Powerful World of Sound
ONLINE: http://www.omnimedianetworks.org/listen.htm

3) FRIDAYS at 6 PM (PT) on KITC, 106.5 FM, Gilchrist, OR: http://kitcfm.com

4) Saturday at 9 AM (CT) on North Texas Radio for the Blind (NTRB)
Reading & Radio Resource, Dallas, TX
www.readingresource.org

5) SATURDAYS at 8 PM (CT) on Wisconsin Public Radio WGTD HD3:
http://www.wgtd.org

6) SATURDAYS at 8 AM (ET) on The 1920s Network, WHRO HD-3, Norfolk Va Beach
http://www.the1920snetwork.com

Stations airing specials:

7) KREV-LP 104.7 FM Estes Park, CO

8) KEOS-FM, 89.1, College Station/Bryan, TX.


Half-Hour+ (30:01-48:59)

Maya Angelou & Guy Johnson - Mother and Son Poets become themselves

From Sedge Thomson | 44:47

It's a joyful, funny, moving and inspiring story of parental and filial love, a memoir of America in a certain time; the influence of a mother on a child; and the importance of knowing how to cook red rice.

Angelou3-sized_small The mother is a poet, the son is a poet. She raised him in San Francisco, New York, later, in Egypt, Africa, Paris. She earned her way cooking creole food in a San Francisco restaurant. She found her way raising her son to learn courage, poetry, and manners. She learned how to prepare "my black boy to be raised in a white society." The mother is the renowned poet and memoirist, Dr. Maya Angelou. The son is Guy Johnson, poet and novelist. She travels to the Bay Area from time to time to visit her son and grandchildren. In this program, we hear Guy talk about his writing, his motivation, the energy of his poetry, and the deep emotion of being a parent. Then, his mother comes on stage and she talks about the conditions of raising him as a mother of 17, her own relationships with her mother and her mother's slave antecedents. You can't learn poetry unless you have courage; you must love yourself to find your way, to be somebody; her son Guy made her who she is. It's a joyful, funny, moving and inspiring story of parental and filial love, a memoir of America in a certain time; the influence of a mother on a child; and the importance of knowing how to cook red rice.

When her daughter became her son (and vice versa)

From Stephanie Lepp | Part of the Reckonings series | 33:37

What happens when the person you thought was your daughter becomes your son, and vice versa? Two mothers struggle to accept their transgender children, and provide a hopeful window into how we might expand our understanding of gender.

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'You have all these plans, all these dreams, and then it hits you: my daughter's no longer a daughter, she's a son.' In struggling to accept her daughter as a transgender man, Rita DiNicola had to surrender dreams of wedding dress shopping and biological grandchildren. Similarly, in accepting her son as a trans woman, Catherine Hyde had to reckon with the fact that — as a tomboy from a young age — she'd always wanted, and believed she'd gotten, a son as her only child. Together, Rita's and Catherine's stories provide a hopeful window into what might help other parents, and other people more broadly, overcome transphobia and expand our understanding of gender.


Half-Hour (24:00-30:00)

Remembrance: On Time And Distance

From Dmae Roberts | 29:01

Dmae Roberts produced a special half-hour radio memorial on the 10th anniversary of her mom’s death. Remembrance: On Time And Distance is part memoir and a collection of radio pieces she’s produced about the complex ties that bind a mother and daughter.

Dmaemombabyponytail_2_small__small For Remembrance: On Time And Distance, Dmae presents a half-hour special with excerpts from Dmae’s Peabody-winning documentary Mei Mei, A Daughter’s Song and The Journey of Lady Buddha. She recounts her weekend trip to Taiwan to rescue her mom when she fell ill and highlights her piece Memorial from the phone messages she saved while taking care of her mom in her final years as she struggled with breast cancer. This is a personal story about a complex relationship that lasts even after death. It's about caregiving and healing for all mothers and daughters, fathers and sons and those taking care of teh ones they love.

Featured music from: Dave Pasche, Stephen Hoyt and special thanks to Aaron Meyer from his CDs Walk, Don’t Walk and Near The Edge. Hear him at AaronMeyer.com.

Memoir excerpt: 10 Years and I still feel anger and pain. The seven stages of grief have long left me but these two emotions keep coming back.

Ten years ago my mom passed away from a recurrence of breast cancer. Three years before that her doctor left her in a hospital gown in a cold radiology room not knowing why she was there. She called me crying when I was two hours away by car and not able able to help her,

Six months before that I took a weekend flight to Taipei, Taiwan to bring her back after relatives I had never met emailed me saying she was sick.

Time and distance. They say that it heals all wounds. Who are they? These mysterious people who offer sayings with vague meanings. Does time heal? Is there ever a way to heal wounds completely that have been opened up over and again through a lifetime?

Time and distance are what separated my mom and me. She of another race, another generation, culture and language. Anger and Pain brought us together and drove our ambitions in life."


 

Dear Birth Mother

From Long Haul Productions | Part of the Becoming a Mom series | 28:58

After waiting for Mr. Right (who has yet to arrive) - and after years of fertility treatments - Suzanne, a single woman in her forties, decided to adopt. She chose transracial adoption.

Suz_loretta_small After waiting in vain for Mr. Right - and after years of fertility treatments - Suzanne, a single, white woman in her forties, decided to adopt. She chose transracial adoption. Long Haul Productions documented the entire process - beginning with workshops designed to "teach white people to raise kids of color," baby-shopping trips with Mom at Target, a critical rendezvous with a young mother at a pancake house, and, finally, a magical night at a suburban restaurant chain. Producers Dan Collison and Elizabeth Meister followed Suzanne for several months as she waited to see if she would become a parent; she offered extraordinary access into her home, and really, into every aspect of her life. This piece debuted on May 9, 2005, on WBEZ (Chicago Public Radio), and subsequently aired May 10, 2005, on All Things Considered. "Dear Birth Mother" is a follow-up to "Babyquest," also available on PRX, which documents Suzanne's failed attempt to get pregnant via In Vitro fertilization.

A Woman of No Consequence

From Canadian Broadcasting Corporation | 31:32

The story of a remarkable Indian woman who struggled with the bonds of tradition and finally broke them in old age, told by her granddaughter.

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Born into a cultured Indian family, she read all the novels of Charles Dickens before she turned ten. Then she was forced to leave school to get married. At 15 she was a mother. And for most of her adult life, Sethu Ramaswamy was in the shadows, trying to find her place in the light.

Finally, at 80, her memoir - Autobiography of an Unknown Indian Woman - was published, to great fanfare and acclaim.

This is the surprising third act in a drama full of surprises - the story of a child bride whose husband was both her true love and the biggest obstacle to her freedom, the story of a woman who set out one day to make for herself the  life she'd always wanted.

Sarmishta Subramanian’s intimate and remarkable documentary brings us the story of her grandmother:  It’s called "A Woman of No Consequence" 

 

Sarmishta Subramanian is a senior editor with Maclean’s Magazine, a national news weekly. This is her first radio documentary.

Karen Levine is the documentary editor at CBC Radio’s The Sunday Edition. She is a two-time winner of the Peabody Award.

 

 

 

 

A Mother's Shortcut

From Peter Bochan | Part of the Shortcuts series | 28:25

A nostalgic look at Mother's Day, mixing music, comedy and archival material. Features Mike Nichols and Elaine May, Al Jolson, Steve Allen, Charlie Weaver, The Beatles, Laurel & Hardy, Monty Python, Carole Bishop, Will Rogers, Humphrey Bogart, Marjorie Main, Elvis Presley & Hy Gardner, Sophie Tucker, The Intruders, Gilda Radner & Dan Ackroyd, Warren Zevon, Raul Julia, George Jessell, Helen Hayes, Robert Walker, Mary Martin, Todd Rundgren, Paul Simon, The Barry Sisters, Vaughn DeLeath, "Stella Dallas", "Ma Perkins", Bill Withers, Violet Bochan (mom) and many more.

Mother03_small A Mother's Shortcut--a classic Mother's Day mix, blending comedy with timely, theme oriented music and archival clips--featuring Mike Nichols and Elaine May, Al Jolson, Steve Allen, Charlie Weaver, The Beatles, Laurel & Hardy, Monty Python, Carole Bishop, Will Rogers, Humphrey Bogart, Marjorie Main, Elvis Presley & Hy Gardner, Sophie Tucker, The Intruders, Gilda Radner & Dan Ackroyd, Warren Zevon, Raul Julia, George Jessell, Helen Hayes, Robert Walker, Mary Martin, Todd Rundgren, Paul Simon, The Barry Sisters, Vaughn DeLeath, "Stella Dallas", "Ma Perkins", Bill Withers, Violet Bochan (mom) and many more.

Mothers and Sons

From Marjorie Van Halteren | 26:44

A sonic memorial to the healing power of art,
"Mothers and Sons" is a double portrait of the German sculptor Kathe Kollwitz (1867-1945), who created "The Grieving Parents," a moving memorial to her son who died in WWI, and the contemporary German-American sculptor Suse Lowenstein, who created an equally monumental work to honor her son, a victim in the 1988 Lockerbie disaster.

Suselogo_small Mothers and Sons is a double portrait of the German sculptor Kathe Kollwitz (1867-1945), who created "The Grieving Parents," a moving memorial to her son who died in WWI, and the contemporary German-Americansculptor Suse Lowenstein , who created an equally monumental work to honor her son, a victim in the 1988 Lockerbie disaster. Both women describe how their work (18 years for Kathe, 14 years for Suse), became a path through their grief, bearing witness to the transforming power of art and creation. Mothers and Sons is a collaboration between Helen Engelhardt, a storyteller and performer, and Marjorie Van Halteren, sound artist. Kathe's diaries are performed by Helen, with Marjorie composing sound and music. Sound recorded on location on Long Island and in Southern Belgium. Mothers and Sons is the third program in a trilogy exploring the themes of war, loss, memory, and regeneration. The two other half hours, "Unquiet Graves," and "Yesterday and Forever, are also available.

The 20th Anniversary of the Lockerbie disaster is December 21, 2008.

The Grandma Plan

From Hearing Voices | Part of the The Plan series | 29:02

A family gathering of materfamilias — all kinds of radio about grandmothers from Hearing Voices.

0605plangrandma_small This week we got Grandmas on the radio... PLAYLIST: ARTIST | AUDIO | ALBUM (*=PRX piece) 1. U.S. Marines | My Grandmother Was 71 | Run To Cadence With The U.S. Marines, Vol.1 2. Jake Warga | Eat Your Eggs* | -- 3. Annie Gallup | Grace | Pearl Street 4. Megan Hall | Advice from a Grandmother* | -- 5. StoryCorps | Isabel Beaton* | StoryCorps 6. Glenn Miller and his Orchestra | Make Believe Ballroom Time | Complete Glenn Miller 7. Jeannete Armstrong | Grandmothers | Word Up 8. StoryCorps | Peggy Edwards* | StoryCorps 9. John Cage | Part 4 | Indeterminacy 10. BUT | Grandma's House | ++ 11. U.S. Women Marines | My Grandmother | Run To Cadence With The U.S. Women Marines

Mother's Day outLoud

From outLoud Radio at Youth Radio | 29:30

This is mother's day with no mush but a lot of heart. 18-year-old Jordan Green and his mom guide us through an exploration of motherhood from various Queer perspectives, with a good dose of humor.

P1010058_small This is mother's day with no mush but a lot of heart. 18-year-old Jordan Green and his mom guide us through an exploration of motherhood from various Queer perspectives, with a good dose of humor and some genuinely sweet moments. We hear the story of a gay teenager who has been living a secret life for years, and gets a huge (pleasant) surprise when he comes out; the tale of a cheerleading boy-obsessed sweet-sixteen girl who fights for the right to live with her lesbian mom; a portrait of two women who adopt a baby boy of a different race; and the progress of one girl's parents over the span of a year, after she tells them she's gay. Created by the Youth Producers of outLoud Radio.

Mei Mei, A Daughter's Song

From Dmae Roberts | 26:35

Winner of a Peabody award, this is the personal story of cross-cultural and cross-generational conflict produced by Dmae Roberts.

Meicover1_small "Mei Mei" is a 25 minute documentary that chronicles Dmae and her mother, Chu-Yin, as they travel to Taiwan together. Mei Mei is Chinese for "little sister" -- a term of endearment for any younger girl. First produced in 1989, Mei Mei was highly personal and groundbreaking for its time--interweaving interviews and dramatizations to tell the story of a conflicted daughter and her mother who suffered abuse, starvation and the horrors of World War Two. MEI MEI has been broadcast on NPR, the BBC, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.


Segments (9:00-23:59)

Ovarian transplants are on infertility's cutting edge

From Robin Amer | 10:29

Thirty-six-year-old twins Carol Enoch and Katy Panek are physically identical in every way but one: Katy was born without ovaries. She never menstruated and took artificial hormones to spark puberty.

Katy wanted children and considered several infertility treatments that are now considered routine. But she was in a position to try something more unusual: an ovarian transplant with sister Carol as the donor.

Their doctor, Sherman Silber, was the first surgeon to perform an ovarian transplant. Because eggs are stored on the outermost layer of an ovary, Silber can perform the surgery like a simple skin graft. The surgery’s benefits extend from there, he says, arguing that ovarian transplants are less painful, costly, and time-consuming that egg donation or in vitro fertilization.

Dr. Silber has now performed ovarian transplants on nine sets of identical twins, but they’re not alone. Women undergoing cancer treatment and women who want to preserve their fertility into their 40s are also seeking out the procedure, by removing and freezing their own ovaries to re-implant them later. And that’s raising questions about the surgery’s practicality and ethics.

Ralph_katy_carol_small Thirty-six-year-old twins Carol Enoch and Katy Panek are physically identical in every way but one: Katy was born without ovaries. She never menstruated and took artificial hormones to spark puberty. Katy wanted children and considered several infertility treatments that are now considered routine. But she was in a position to try something more unusual: an ovarian transplant with sister Carol as the donor. Their doctor, Sherman Silber, was the first surgeon to perform an ovarian transplant. Because eggs are stored on the outermost layer of an ovary, Silber can perform the surgery like a simple skin graft. The surgery’s benefits extend from there, he says, arguing that ovarian transplants are less painful, costly, and time-consuming that egg donation or in vitro fertilization. Dr. Silber has now performed ovarian transplants on nine sets of identical twins, but they’re not alone. Women undergoing cancer treatment and women who want to preserve their fertility into their 40s are also seeking out the procedure, by removing and freezing their own ovaries to re-implant them later. And that’s raising questions about the surgery’s practicality and ethics.

The Myth of the Female Fertility Cliff

From marnie chesterton | 10:00

Women over 30 who haven't yet had kids are often told “tick tick; your biological clock is running out of time."

Marnie Chesterton digs into the facts underpinning those views. When do women become infertile and why? Female fertility is a relatively neglected area of medical research, and the data used to estimate fertility has, until recently, come from French birth records from 1670 to 1830!

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Women over 30 who haven't yet had kids are often told “tick tick; your biological clock is running out of time."
Marnie Chesterton digs into the facts underpinning those views. When do women become infertile and why? Female fertility is a relatively neglected area of medical research, and the data used to estimate fertility has, until recently, come from French birth records from 1670 to 1830.

David Dunson, a biostatistician from Duke University explains how he studied modern couples, and how his results don't show a sudden cliff edge of infertility.

The Longest Shortest Time (Series)

Produced by Hillary Frank

The truth about early motherhood.

Most recent piece in this series:

What YOU Expect When You're Expecting

From Hillary Frank | Part of the The Longest Shortest Time series | 22:54

The-boy-at-32-weeks-prx_small Joanne is having her first baby at the age of 40. The Longest Shortest Time's Hillary Frank checks in with Joanne to find out what she's expecting when she's expecting. Turns out Joanne is imagining all sorts of vivid horror scenarios about her baby — and his possible future as an arsonist, rapist, war criminal, or all three.

Life of the Law #23 - Of Prison and Pregnancy

From Life of the Law | Part of the Life of the Law series | 16:11

The United States incarcerates six times as many women as it did thirty years ago. Many of these women are already mothers, and four percent of incarcerated women enter prison pregnant. What happens to the babies born in the correctional system? What happens to the children left behind, as their mothers serve out their sentences?

Ep23-momsincarcerationphotocell_small

On January 29th 2013, Diana was on her way to get a sonogram.

“And the minute I turned on my car,” she remembers, “they pulled up on the side and told me to get out the car. They put the handcuffs on me and took me in.”

Diana asked us not to use her last name for reasons related to her arrest. She’s a 23 year old from Queens, New York. That day in January, she found herself in a jail cell at Rikers Island, seven months pregnant.

“They had told me that I was under arrest because of what my boyfriend did,” she says.

Her boyfriend, the baby’s father, had gone to jail ten days earlier. He’d sold drugs to an undercover cop. The cop had come to their home and caught the sale on video.

“I was in my room minding my business,” she says of that day, “when the officer came in, and my boyfriend had called me and told him to pass him a bag that was in the room. And that’s where the drugs came out of. And that’s what I’m in the video doing, just giving the black bag.”

Diana faced a felony charge as an accomplice to a drug deal. She says nobody at Rikers would really tell her what was going on.

“At first it was like I couldn’t sleep,” she recalls. “I was scared of, maybe if I’m sleeping somebody decides to come behind me and hurt me or something. Because I’m pregnant and they feel like I can’t defend myself. It was really hard.”

She says she did get medical care. “They would give me my prenatal pills. If I were to get sick or whatever they would take care of me, they had their nurses who would help us.

“They fed us, “ she continues. “I mean, the schedule wasn’t all that great and the food wasn’t all that great but at least they fed us. I would sometimes not even eat because the food was so nasty. But I was pregnant: I had to feed my son so I had to force myself to eat.”

Diana later found out that pregnant women at Rikers get taken to a hospital to give birth. But she didn’t know that while she was at the jail.

“I was just thinking the crazy things that would go on if I was to give birth in there,” she says. “I just thought, honestly, that they would take the baby away, and either a family member had to pick him up and take care of him, or the system took him.”

Diana’s story is more common than you might expect. Four percent of women prisoners enter prison pregnant – that results in thousands of babies born in the correctional system each year. But as far as what to do with these babies, or their mothers, the US lacks any national policy.

In most European countries, incarcerated mothers keep their newborns in prison with them through preschool age. The US followed the same protocol until the 1950s, but by the seventies, most states had ended these programs.

New York is one of the only states that still has a small prison nursery program, and Bedford Hills Correctional facility has the oldest prison nursery in the country. In 1998, Mary Byrne, a professor at Columbia University School of Nursing, visited Bedford Hills with some students.

“As I discovered the prison nursery,” she says, “my question was…‘Is this good idea?’”

Byrne wondered if kids could develop normally after starting life in prison. Advocates believed that keeping a baby together with his or her imprisoned mom could help the mother-child bond, but few had researched the topic. Byrne decided to study prison nursery moms and their kids.

Women who are pregnant when they come to Bedford Hills can apply for the prison nursery. Only a few dozen are accepted – the rest have to give up child custody while they serve out their sentences. The prison superintendent at Bedford Hills makes that decision, and those who are chosen are allowed to keep their babies in prison for a year, sometimes longer if they’re getting out soon.

“To me,” Byrne says, “what I would liken it to, as I watched the mothers raise these infants in this setting, is that it was very much like working mothers on the outside.”

While Byrne was at Bedford, two or three mom and baby pairs shared a room, housed in a separate wing from the other prisoners. These days, there are fewer women in the nursery, so each pair has a room to itself. In the mornings, moms go off to their prison jobs and their babies go to the nursery, like kids outside of prison go to daycare. The moms also receive parenting classes.

A Department of Corrections study found having a baby in a prison nursery makes a woman twice as likely to stay out of prison later. Byrne decided to conduct her own research, following sixty of the babies from the Bedford prison nursery until the age of eight She compared their development to kids in the general population.

“The children overall did very well,” Byrne concludes. “The children are for the most part in their grade for their age level and doing well in school. And their parents send us pictures and report cards, unbidden, and letters, and are really so very proud of their children’s achievements.”

Byrne’s most surprising finding has to do with attachment.

“There’s a process,” she explains, “that goes on through the first two years of a child’s life, related to being able to identify a primary caregiver, investing trust in that caregiver, and knowing that that caregiver will be there in times of fear, or illness, or loneliness. So the child can wander away and try out new things, but has a secure base to return to, and feel protected.”

Byrne interviewed moms in the nursery, and found most of them lacked this kind of secure attachment with their own parents. Most researchers agree that if a mother lacked attachment growing up, she will find it difficult to ensure that her own children attach. But Byrne found that 70 percent of the babies she studied managed to form secure attachment with their moms – more than in the outside world.

Despite these findings, prison nurseries are extremely rare. Byrne once counted all the available spots in prison nurseries across the United States and found only 135. Which means, for all intents and purposes, a baby born to a mom in a US prison is a baby that will not know his or her mom, maybe for a long while.

Georgia Lerner leads the Women’s Prison Association in New York. She says support for moms shouldn’t have to be found in prison.

“They are not really places that are supposed to be schools, psychiatric hospitals, medical hospitals, childcare facilities. They were not designed to provide all of these services. And it’s one of the reasons I don’t think it makes a whole lot of sense to send so many people to prison when there are so many issues that could be better addressed in the community where we already have schools, we already have healthcare facilities, we already have mental health providers.”

The Women’s Prison Association started in the early 1800s. Back then, they had to make sure woman got their own prisons, apart from men. These days, they focus on keeping women out of prison when possible – including Diana.

After seven weeks at Rikers, Diana got out on bail just before she gave birth. Her grandmother took her in, to her apartment in Queens. Diana was still going back and forth to court. If she didn’t plead guilty, the judge told her she’d face three to five years in prison.

If Diana did plead guilty, she could get into a drug recovery program instead of doing time – a common occurrence for drug offenders, even non-addicts like Diana. But the drug program was residential, so she’d have to leave her son.

Fortunately, the district attorney put Diana’s public defender in touch with the Women’s Prison Association. They’ve convinced courts to try community-based alternatives, programs that let women stay at home with their kids. They interviewed Diana to make sure she was a good fit for an alternative to incarceration program, and eventually accepted her. For six to eight months, Diana will meet with a counselor and go to group sessions, all while she’s on probation.

Even though alternative to incarceration programs are expanding, more and more women are still going to prison. The US now incarcerates six times as many women as it did thirty years ago. Many of those women are mothers.

Tamar Kraft-Stolar is the director of the Women in Prison Project at the Correctional Association of New York, an organization that monitors women’s prisons in the state.

“If you had to pick probably a defining legacy of the incarceration of women,” Kraft-Stolar says, “it would really be the destruction of families.”

Two months into her alternative to incarceration program, Diana says, “I honestly wish it wouldn’t ever be over.

"I thought [the program] was just going to be about jail and drugs, but it’s not,” she continues. "It’s more so learning about yourself and listening to others stories. I really like group."

Diana’s support group meets every Friday, and her counselor comes to the house three times a week. She has another four to six months to go, depending on the judge’s determination of her progress.

The boyfriend is serving a nine-year sentence in an upstate New York prison. Diana and the baby visit him every couple of weeks, but Diana’s counselor’s helping her move on as a single mom. She’s still living at her grandma’s place, but she’s working on financial stability, applying for jobs in retail.

She’s also thinking about going back to school, getting a degree. But for now, Diana says she just feels lucky to be with her son.

"He makes my day just got by faster,” she says with a smile. “He doesn’t really cry much; he’s just a happy baby. I’m blessed."

Hockey Mom

From Canadian Broadcasting Corporation | Part of the CBC Radio's Outfront series | 13:16

Gillian Rutherford is a dedicated hockey mom who has decided to move from the stands onto the ice.

Prxoutfrontplain_small Hockey Mom by Gillian Rutherford Gillian Rutherford is a dedicated hockey mom in Edmonton. But now she’s decided to move from the stands onto the ice. Gillian is learning to play hockey at age 41, after watching her three sons play for years. Producers: Lynda Shorten and Alison Moss Outfront Opening and Closing Theme available - (see Timing and Cues section for more details) SEE ADDITIONAL LICENSE TERMS

The Chemistry of Motherhood

From Distillations Podcast | Part of the Distillations series | 12:09

What makes motherhood scientific? This week we look at changing attitudes about mothers, pregnancy, and science. We explore the history of pregnancy tests, and what that has to do with South African clawed frogs.

Goldenbookedit_small What makes motherhood scientific? This week, we try to answer, with a look at changing attitudes about mothers, pregnancy, and science. We explore the history of pregnancy tests, and what that has to do with South African clawed frogs. Janet Golden, an expert on fetal alcohol syndrome, joins us to talk about how ideas have changed regarding pregnant women and what they should and shouldn?t consume. And we learn about Marie Curie and her daughters?one a scientist, the other a writer. Element of the Week: Curium.

RPM Podcast #013: “Motherhood”

From Christa Couture | Part of the The RPM Podcast series | 21:33

RPM looks at Indigenous motherhood and music.

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Many nations around Turtle Island have references in their oral traditions and prophecies about the important role of the 7th Generation. This concept refers to the 7th Generation to be born after contact with European settlers and how we must live our lives in a sustainable way making sure the earth is sustainable for 7 generations to come. The people with the most direct connection to the next 7th generations are, of course, our mothers.

Episode #013 of the RPM Podcast hosted by Ostwelve explores three Indigenous mothers who happen to also be active musicians. Lakota Jones (Mohawk, Cherokee, Lakota) credits her children as her biggest supporters. Inez (Sto:lo) went on tour and was surprised to see that some communities were uncomfortable with her breastfeeding her son. Eekwol (Muskoday First Nation) shares stories about how music helped her heal from post-partum depression. All three women are learning how to juggle their careers with their new found commitment to raising the next generation.

Visiting a Prison Nursery

From Making Contact | Part of the Making Contact series | 14:25

What happens when a women gives birth behind bars? Usually those babies are sent home with family members or put into foster care. But some prisons are trying an alternative: prison nurseries. Reporter Shannon Heffernan spent six months visiting a prison nursery in Decatur, Illinois, to find out how the experiment in keeping families together, at least for the infancy stage, is working.

Episode_pic_for__14-11_small What happens when a women gives birth behind bars? Usually those babies are sent home with family members or put into foster care. But some prisons are trying an alternative: prison nurseries. Reporter Shannon Heffernan spent six months visiting a prison nursery in Decatur, Illinois, to find out how the experiment in keeping families together, at least for the infancy stage, is working.

Not All Bad things

From Chana Joffe-Walt | 09:55

A twelve year-old's audio diary about life with a mom in prison.

Newpaytonwithmic_small Payton's mom has been in prison for two years. She lives with her great-grandmother in Seattle. Several months before her mom's release Payton recorded an audio diary of "life while my mom is away." From behind a microphone, Payton interviews family members and tries to make sense of her situation.

Travels with Mom

From Hearing Voices | Part of the Larry Massett stories series | 12:23

A trip to Tybee through time: a mother's p.o.v.

Lmmom_small These days, taking mom for out for a day-trip doesn't involve going as far in distance, as it does back in time. Tybee Island, Georgia, now and in the 1920s, as seen by Mrs. Massett. (Premiered 2001 on Savvy Traveler.)

My Mother's Disease

From Radio Rookies | 09:37

17-years-old Vikky Cruz struggles to cope with her mother's illness, a rare genetic disease called neuroacanthytosis, and the ways it's taken over the mother she once knew.

Vikkycruz_small Until recently all Victoria (Vikky) Cruz knew was that her mother was sick. Her mother hasn't been able to walk in years, can barely speak and goes into rages, but no one ever told Vikky why. Now, at 17-years-old, Vikky struggles to cope with her mother's illness, a rare genetic disease called neuroacanthytosis, and the ways it's taken over the mother she once knew.

The Day My Mother's Head Exploded

From Hannah Palin | 19:59

This is the story of the brain aneurysm that almost killed my mother in 1987, and how she became a completely different person from the mother of my childhood.

Default-piece-image-1 On August 20, 1987 my mother had a brain aneurysm when she was only forty-six years old. She survived. Most people don't. I've come to refer to this life-changing event as "The Day My Mother's Head Exploded." The proper, socially conscious mother I grew up with died that day, and was replaced by an entirely different person. It turns out that my new mother adores Wendy's hamburgers, likes to wear Groucho Marx glasses in public places and will perform a spirited rendition of "Goodbye My Coney Island Baby" at the drop of a hat. When my mother's head exploded, she had a chance to start all over again and she took it. I didn't really get my wacky new mom and spent years grieving for the mother of my childhood. But when I was finally able to realize that my mother's eccentricities are really heart-felt affirmations of survival I was able to move on and to appreciate the person who exists in the here and now. I've wanted to tell her story, and my own, too, for years now, but have struggled with form and structure. I'm a writer and producer with a background in theatre and documentary filmmaking. Despite all of the tools at my disposal, I just couldn't get it right. Then, on a whim, I borrowed a mini-disc recorder and did an extended interview with my mother when she was on a visit to Seattle. A year later, Jack Straw Productions awarded me some studio time and the services of Scott Bartlett, an extraordinarily gifted and patient engineer, who helped me navigate a host of technical landmines so that I could find the true path to this particular story. "The Day My Mother's Head Exploded" was first presented to the public as part of the Jack Straw Artist Support Program in April 2003. When the piece was over, my mother joined me on stage where we performed her signature song, "Goodbye My Coney Island Baby." And yes, we wore Groucho Marx Glasses.


Cutaways (5:00-8:59)

Mom Prom

From Homefront Chronicles | Part of the Homefront Chronicles series | 05:28

Myla Rugge realized shortly after becoming a mother for the first time that something was missing for her and her friends. She took matters into her own hands and created one of the first events of its kind in the US: Mom Prom.

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Myla Rugge realized shortly after becoming a mother for the first time that something was missing for she and her friends. She took matters into her own hands and created one of the first events of its kind in the US. A prom just for moms.

Gleeful Barbarians

From Sarah Boothroyd | 05:42

Gleeful Barbarians features very silly noises, nearly-indecipherable toddler chitchat, and 27 different ways a two-year-old can say 'no.'

Gleeful_barbarians_1_small Gleeful Barbarians is an audio postcard from the often joyful, sometimes exasperating, and always busy world of early parenthood.

Featuring very silly noises, nearly-indecipherable toddler chitchat, and 27 different ways a two-year-old can say 'no.' 

Creative Commons music provided by Travis Morgan and Mortisville.

Recipient of a Gold Medal for Best Editing at the 2013 New York Festivals Radio Programming Awards.

My First Travel Partner

From Travel with Rick Steves | Part of the Mother's Day Features - Travel with Rick Steves series | 05:39

In honor of the first Mother's Day since the death of his own mother last year, the host of the public radio show "Travel with Rick Steves" talks about his first travel partner: His mother.

Trs_logo_small In honor of the first Mother's Day since the death of his own mother last year, the host of the public radio show "Travel with Rick Steves" talks about his first travel partner: His mother.

Mother's Day Features - Travel with Rick Steves (Series)

Produced by Travel with Rick Steves

Two Mother's Day features from the public radio program, "Travel with Rick Steves." Rick talks about his first travel partner, his mother. And show producer Sarah McCormic unexpectedly encounters her mother's past as a young woman in San Francisco.

Most recent piece in this series:

My First Travel Partner

From Travel with Rick Steves | Part of the Mother's Day Features - Travel with Rick Steves series | 05:39

Trs_logo_small In honor of the first Mother's Day since the death of his own mother last year, the host of the public radio show "Travel with Rick Steves" talks about his first travel partner: His mother.

Hidden Kitchen Mama

From The Kitchen Sisters | Part of the Hidden Kitchens series | 08:23

Mothers and kitchens.
The food they cooked or didn’t.
The stories they told or couldn’t.
In honor of Mother’s Day we linger in the kitchen.

Unknown_small Mothers and kitchens. The food they cooked or didn’t. The stories they told or couldn’t. In honor of Mother’s Day we linger in the kitchen. The Kitchen — the room in the house that counts the most, that smells the best, where families gather and children are fed, where all good parties begin and end. The room where the best stories are told.

Cathy, 16, Mom

From Sarah Elzas | 06:06

Cathy is 16. She loves listening to Outkast. She wanted to be a lawyer, but now she thinks she wants to be an accountant. Cathy is also still a freshman in high school because she is the mother of two little boys, the oldest, James, is two years old. From Sarah Elzahs.

Cathyradio_small "If I could still have the same kids, I would have waited. But- I love my kids.I wouldn't give 'em up for the world. No matter how hard it is." Cathy is 16. She loves listening to Outkast. She wanted to be a lawyer, but now she thinks she wants to be an accountant. Cathy is also still a freshman in high school because she is the mother of two little boys, the oldest, James, is two years old. She attends a high school for teen mothers which is where she gets the most support from anyone all day. This is a non-narrated, first-person glimpse into the chaotic life of a very young mother. It is not a story of regret and moralizing about early sexuality. Instead, Cathy reflects on her need to be grown-up, as a mother to her two boys, while also wanting to be just a teenager. This piece was produced at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies.

Dia's Diary: My Mother

From outLoud Radio at Youth Radio | 06:08

Many transgender people come out as gay first. Dia Fallana is a young transgender woman living in a poor part of Oakland, California. In this page from her audio diary, she tells the story of how her mother's anti-gay attitude kept her in the closet -- until she was forced to tell the truth. From outLoud Radio.

Default-piece-image-0 Many transgender people come out as gay first. Dia Fallana is a young transgender woman living in a poor part of Oakland, California. In this page from her audio diary, she tells the story of how her mother's anti-gay attitude kept her in the closet -- until she was forced to tell the truth.

Memorial

From Dmae Roberts | 05:51

Every 100 days, Dmae Roberts saves the phone messages of her mom who passed away. From Dmae Roberts.

Playing
Memorial
From
Dmae Roberts

Memorial_small What's left after someone passes on? Photographs and phone messages. The reality of death hits hardest when the loved one no longer calls you on the phone. Every 100 days, Roberts saves the phone messages of her mom who passed away five years ago as a living memorial and as a way to still get a phone call from her mom. Memorial follows the caretaking and illness of Chu-Yin Roberts through the phone messages. This piece can be aired on Mother's Day or Memorial Day. Could also be appropriately during holidays for those who have lost loved ones. Also appropriate for Asian History Month in May. There is one minute of music tail to read credits to close a magazine show with.

Mothers in Uniform

From KRCC-FM | 05:42

Mothers in the military talk about being deployed. From Eric Whitney.

Westernskieslogoprx_small Eric Whitney talks to military mothers who are deployed in Iraq. They tell us what it's like to be serving their country far away from their children.

Giving Women The Vote

From Sandra Sleight-Brennan | 05:02

2010 is the 90th anniversary of the 19th Amendment which gave American women the right to vote. The story of the actual vote for ratification in August 1920 is a dramatic one.

Votes150_small Most people think of George Washington’s election as the first time Americans voted on the national level.  But it wasn’t until the election of 1920 that women throughout the nation had the right to vote.  It happened when one representative in the Tennessee House of Representatives followed his mother's advice and voted for suffrage.


Drop-Ins (2:00-4:59)

StoryCorps: Fatuma Abdullahi, Annie Johnson and Maryan Osman

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 02:32

Maryan Osman and her sister, Fatuma Abdullahi, are Somalis who came to the U.S. as refugees in 2014 and found a stable home with Annie and Randall Johnson. The sisters sat down with Annie to talk about what it's been like -- for all of them -- to become a family.

Johnsonanpr_small Maryan Osman and her sister, Fatuma Abdullahi, are Somalis who came to the U.S. as refugees in 2014 and found a stable home with Annie and Randall Johnson. The sisters sat down with Annie to talk about what it's been like -- for all of them -- to become a family.

A Mother's Lens

From Ahri Golden | 04:54

From award-winning producer Ahri Golden, A Mother's Lens integrates original song, radio journalism, and photography into a five-minute sound rich depiction of the US Immigration Ban Protest, where Golden is reminded of profound human unity among the people.

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From award-winning producer Ahri Golden, A Mother's Lens integrates original song, radio journalism, and photography into a five-minute sound rich depiction of the US Immigration Ban Protest, where Golden is reminded of profound human unity among the people.

"A whole new genre! Forget about the radio paradigm. This piece breaks it wide open. Brilliant!"
- Tania Ketenjian, Sound Made Public 

"Ahri Golden was one of the earliest successful producers on PRX - and now she is back with a special for Mother's Day."  
- John Barth, Chief Content Officer, PRX 

Voicemails from Mom

From Jeff Cohen | 03:00

My mom died a year ago.

Since then, I've spent time going through old voicemails she left me. Here's the result.

Things you should know. She spent most of her life in New Orleans, which you can hear. She loved cooking, shopping, shouting, gambling, Mardi Gras, the
"Innanet", the Saints (Who Dat), her friends, her family, and her grandchildren. And pretty much everyone else -- except for those she didn't love. She didn't care for them much at all.

Judy_small My mom died a year ago. Since then, I've spent time going through old voicemails she left me. Here's the result. Things you should know. She spent most of her life in New Orleans, which you can hear. She loved cooking, shopping, shouting, gambling, Mardi Gras, the "Innanet", the Saints (Who Dat), her friends, her family, and her grandchildren. And pretty much everyone else -- except for those she didn't love. She didn't care for them much at all.

U.S. Moms Need More than Flowers

From KSFR | Part of the Equal Time with Martha Burk series | 02:30

Two and one-half minute commentary by Equal Time host Martha Burk on how new U.S. policies should support mothers.

Podcastphoto_small The U.S. is far behind other developed countries when it comes to support for motherhood.  Most mothers are in the paid workforce, and we need new policies that match reality.

Here I Am, Saying Thanks To My Mom

From Curie Youth Radio | 02:19

David was born premature, at great risk to his mother. He imagines the day of his birth.

Curtain_small Eighteen year old David Diaz knows that his birth endangered his mother's life. He reimagines the day of his birth as a way of connecting with his mom, and thanking her.

Life of the Law Shorts #23 - Of Prison and Pregnancy

From Life of the Law | Part of the Life of the Law Shorts series | 04:40

The United States incarcerates six times as many women as it did thirty years ago. Many of these women are already mothers, and four percent of incarcerated women enter prison pregnant. What happens to the babies born in the correctional system? What happens to the children left behind, as their mothers serve out their sentences?

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“And the minute I turned on my car,” she remembers, “they pulled up on the side and told me to get out the car. They put the handcuffs on me and took me in.”

Diana asked us not to use her last name for reasons related to her arrest. She’s a 23 year old from Queens, New York. That day in January, she found herself in a jail cell at Rikers Island, seven months pregnant.

“They had told me that I was under arrest because of what my boyfriend did,” she says.

Her boyfriend, the baby’s father, had gone to jail ten days earlier. He’d sold drugs to an undercover cop. The cop had come to their home and caught the sale on video.

“I was in my room minding my business,” she says of that day, “when the officer came in, and my boyfriend had called me and told him to pass him a bag that was in the room. And that’s where the drugs came out of. And that’s what I’m in the video doing, just giving the black bag.”

Diana faced a felony charge as an accomplice to a drug deal. She says nobody at Rikers would really tell her what was going on.

“At first it was like I couldn’t sleep,” she recalls. “I was scared of, maybe if I’m sleeping somebody decides to come behind me and hurt me or something. Because I’m pregnant and they feel like I can’t defend myself. It was really hard.”

She says she did get medical care. “They would give me my prenatal pills. If I were to get sick or whatever they would take care of me, they had their nurses who would help us.

“They fed us, “ she continues. “I mean, the schedule wasn’t all that great and the food wasn’t all that great but at least they fed us. I would sometimes not even eat because the food was so nasty. But I was pregnant: I had to feed my son so I had to force myself to eat.”

Diana later found out that pregnant women at Rikers get taken to a hospital to give birth. But she didn’t know that while she was at the jail.

“I was just thinking the crazy things that would go on if I was to give birth in there,” she says. “I just thought, honestly, that they would take the baby away, and either a family member had to pick him up and take care of him, or the system took him.”

Diana’s story is more common than you might expect. Four percent of women prisoners enter prison pregnant – that results in thousands of babies born in the correctional system each year. But as far as what to do with these babies, or their mothers, the US lacks any national policy.

In most European countries, incarcerated mothers keep their newborns in prison with them through preschool age. The US followed the same protocol until the 1950s, but by the seventies, most states had ended these programs.

New York is one of the only states that still has a small prison nursery program, and Bedford Hills Correctional facility has the oldest prison nursery in the country. In 1998, Mary Byrne, a professor at Columbia University School of Nursing, visited Bedford Hills with some students.

“As I discovered the prison nursery,” she says, “my question was…‘Is this good idea?’”

Byrne wondered if kids could develop normally after starting life in prison. Advocates believed that keeping a baby together with his or her imprisoned mom could help the mother-child bond, but few had researched the topic. Byrne decided to study prison nursery moms and their kids.

Women who are pregnant when they come to Bedford Hills can apply for the prison nursery. Only a few dozen are accepted – the rest have to give up child custody while they serve out their sentences. The prison superintendent at Bedford Hills makes that decision, and those who are chosen are allowed to keep their babies in prison for a year, sometimes longer if they’re getting out soon.

“To me,” Byrne says, “what I would liken it to, as I watched the mothers raise these infants in this setting, is that it was very much like working mothers on the outside.”

While Byrne was at Bedford, two or three mom and baby pairs shared a room, housed in a separate wing from the other prisoners. These days, there are fewer women in the nursery, so each pair has a room to itself. In the mornings, moms go off to their prison jobs and their babies go to the nursery, like kids outside of prison go to daycare. The moms also receive parenting classes.

A Department of Corrections study found having a baby in a prison nursery makes a woman twice as likely to stay out of prison later. Byrne decided to conduct her own research, following sixty of the babies from the Bedford prison nursery until the age of eight She compared their development to kids in the general population.

“The children overall did very well,” Byrne concludes. “The children are for the most part in their grade for their age level and doing well in school. And their parents send us pictures and report cards, unbidden, and letters, and are really so very proud of their children’s achievements.”

Byrne’s most surprising finding has to do with attachment.

“There’s a process,” she explains, “that goes on through the first two years of a child’s life, related to being able to identify a primary caregiver, investing trust in that caregiver, and knowing that that caregiver will be there in times of fear, or illness, or loneliness. So the child can wander away and try out new things, but has a secure base to return to, and feel protected.”

Byrne interviewed moms in the nursery, and found most of them lacked this kind of secure attachment with their own parents. Most researchers agree that if a mother lacked attachment growing up, she will find it difficult to ensure that her own children attach. But Byrne found that 70 percent of the babies she studied managed to form secure attachment with their moms – more than in the outside world.

Despite these findings, prison nurseries are extremely rare. Byrne once counted all the available spots in prison nurseries across the United States and found only 135. Which means, for all intents and purposes, a baby born to a mom in a US prison is a baby that will not know his or her mom, maybe for a long while.

Georgia Lerner leads the Women’s Prison Association in New York. She says support for moms shouldn’t have to be found in prison.

“They are not really places that are supposed to be schools, psychiatric hospitals, medical hospitals, childcare facilities. They were not designed to provide all of these services. And it’s one of the reasons I don’t think it makes a whole lot of sense to send so many people to prison when there are so many issues that could be better addressed in the community where we already have schools, we already have healthcare facilities, we already have mental health providers.”

The Women’s Prison Association started in the early 1800s. Back then, they had to make sure woman got their own prisons, apart from men. These days, they focus on keeping women out of prison when possible – including Diana.

After seven weeks at Rikers, Diana got out on bail just before she gave birth. Her grandmother took her in, to her apartment in Queens. Diana was still going back and forth to court. If she didn’t plead guilty, the judge told her she’d face three to five years in prison.

If Diana did plead guilty, she could get into a drug recovery program instead of doing time – a common occurrence for drug offenders, even non-addicts like Diana. But the drug program was residential, so she’d have to leave her son.

Fortunately, the district attorney put Diana’s public defender in touch with the Women’s Prison Association. They’ve convinced courts to try community-based alternatives, programs that let women stay at home with their kids. They interviewed Diana to make sure she was a good fit for an alternative to incarceration program, and eventually accepted her. For six to eight months, Diana will meet with a counselor and go to group sessions, all while she’s on probation.

Even though alternative to incarceration programs are expanding, more and more women are still going to prison. The US now incarcerates six times as many women as it did thirty years ago. Many of those women are mothers.

Tamar Kraft-Stolar is the director of the Women in Prison Project at the Correctional Association of New York, an organization that monitors women’s prisons in the state.

“If you had to pick probably a defining legacy of the incarceration of women,” Kraft-Stolar says, “it would really be the destruction of families.”

Two months into her alternative to incarceration program, Diana says, “I honestly wish it wouldn’t ever be over.

"I thought [the program] was just going to be about jail and drugs, but it’s not,” she continues. "It’s more so learning about yourself and listening to others stories. I really like group."

Diana’s support group meets every Friday, and her counselor comes to the house three times a week. She has another four to six months to go, depending on the judge’s determination of her progress.

The boyfriend is serving a nine-year sentence in an upstate New York prison. Diana and the baby visit him every couple of weeks, but Diana’s counselor’s helping her move on as a single mom. She’s still living at her grandma’s place, but she’s working on financial stability, applying for jobs in retail.

She’s also thinking about going back to school, getting a degree. But for now, Diana says she just feels lucky to be with her son.

"He makes my day just got by faster,” she says with a smile. “He doesn’t really cry much; he’s just a happy baby. I’m blessed."

Singing by Myself

From City High Radio | 02:31

Fifteen-year-old Adri loves to sing, especially the songs she remembers her mother singing. Adri hasn't seen her mother in six years, but when she sings, she can hear her mother's voice in her own.

Default-piece-image-1 Fifteen-year-old Adri loves to sing, especially the songs she remembers her mother singing. Adri hasn't seen her mother in six years, but when she sings, she can hear her mother's voice in her own.

Mother's Day "Far Side"

From Jake Warga | 05:53

A piece about the funniest person I knew: my mother. Told by going through a Gary Larson "Far Side" calendar. Funny and sad...like life.

Farside_small A produced piece about the funniest person I knew: my mother. Told by going through a Gary Larson "Far Side" calendar. Funny and sad...like life. Aired ATC, 12-29-03 Produced with sound FX and Music. Clean mix at 5:53 Broadcast mix at 4:30 with host in/out.

Mom's accident

From MPR News Stations | Part of the MPR News' Youth Series series | 04:52

How a mother's skiing accident changed a family's life and offered lessons to her daughters.

20091229_kiyomizudera-in-tokyo_1_small For the Fink family, each New Year's Day marks another anniversary of an event that profoundly changed the family's life.

Every New Year, the family of St. Louis Park loads up the car with cross-country ski gear and heads up North. These days, they make the trip minus one pair of skis. Eleven years ago, when Mara Fink was in fourth grade and her sister was a second-grader, their mom fell on a ski trail and was paralyzed from the neck down.

Mara is now a junior at St. Olaf College.  

What I love About My Mother

From City High Radio | 02:45

High school students tell you what they love about their mothers.

20100513__kitty1_small In this sweet, short vox-pop, high school producers A and Vaughn ask students at City High School, "What do you love about your mother?" The answers are soooo sweet!

Gestational Carrier, Mom Celebrate Mother's Day

From Grace Hood | 04:38

How far would you go to help a good friend?

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It’s a question two Boulder couples have spent the last year-and-a-half considering, and they’ve come up with some pretty unconventional answers. On this Mother's Day, KUNC’s Grace Hood reports on the final steps they'll take of a journey that started from one person’s medical misfortune…

I'm so embarrassing to my children

From Nanci Olesen | 03:17

On Mother's Day, I'm realizing just how embarrassing I am to my children. I say the wrong things, I cry at the wrong time, I act way too happy when I shouldn't... I'm so uncool. How did this happen?

Default-piece-image-0 On Mother's Day, I'm realizing just how embarrassing I am to my children. I say the wrong things, I cry at the wrong time, I act way too happy when I shouldn't... I'm so uncool. How did this happen?

Letter to My Mom: You Haven't Lost Me

From Curie Youth Radio | 02:21

A letter from daughter to mom about love, hope, and Chuck E. Cheese.

Images_small Curie Youth Radio is a writing and radio production class at Curie High School on Chicago's Southwest side. Here, students create their own stories: fresh takes on everything from snowball fights to gang warfare. They see their stories as a way for teenagers in one Chicago high school to reach out to the rest of the world.


Interstitials (Under 2:00)

Love Letters to Mom from College

From Syracuse University Broadcast Journalism | 01:21

What would college students say to their mothers on Mother's Day, since many students can't be with her?

Img_4450_small What would college students say to their mothers on Mother's Day, since many students can't be with her?

Dear Mom: I Joined the Marines

From Curie Youth Radio | 01:49

An apology and a plea for a mother's understanding when a son joins the Marines. Omar joined the Marines this year. His piece tries to end a battle with his mother about signing up in the first place.

Omar_small Omar joined the Marines this year. His piece tries to end a battle with his mother about signing up in the first place. This letter to a mother shows us the love that remains between a mother and son who cannot find a common ground. It gives us a glimpse of the fear and anxiety of a parent of a new recruit as well as the bittersweet certainty of an eighteen-year-old who naturally believes in his own immortality. This piece was broadcast on Chicago Public Radio, WBEZ 91.5, on March 18, 2005.