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Playlist: Women's History Month: Hour Specials

Compiled By: PRX Editors

 Credit: <a  href="http://www.flickr.com/people/onkel_wart">flickr_onkel_wart</a>
Image by: flickr_onkel_wart 
Curated Playlist

March is Women's History Month.

Also check out our Women's History Month picks under 49:00 and Music Specials.

Curious about how stuff gets on this list?

Hour Specials

Inflection Point with Lauren Schiller (Series)

Produced by KALW

Conversations with women who are changing the status quo.
New shows posted on Thursdays.

Most recent piece in this series:

64: Deb Liu of Facebook is Developing More Women in Tech; Dr. Shruti Naik of The Rockefeller University is Keeping More Women in Science

From KALW | Part of the Inflection Point with Lauren Schiller series | 54:00

Shruti_naik_small Deb Liu is VP of Platform and Marketplace at Facebook. As one of few female executives in technology, she is working to address the challenges that women in tech are facing-- both on day-to-day basis and through a conference she co-created called "Women in Product." Dr. Shruti Naik is a post-doctoral fellow at The Rockefeller University, leader of The Women In Science At Rockefeller program and winner of L'Oreal USA's 2016 For Women In Science award.

Rocket Girls and Astro-nettes

From Richard Paul | 59:07

Women in the ultimate Man’s World – the labs and shuttle crew cabins of NASA in the '60s and '70s.

Eileen_collins_nasa_photo_2_of_2_small This program is the story of women in the ultimate Man’s World – the labs and Shuttle crew cabins of NASA.  Told in the first person, these stories explore the experiences of NASA’s first woman engineers and scientists and its first astronauts.  It also tells the fascinating story of a group of women pilots who – in the early 1960s – were led to believe that they would be America’s first women astronauts and were given the exact same physical tests are the Mercury astronauts.  The program is narrated by Eileen Collins, the first woman commander of a Space Shuttle. 

The Hidden World of Girls with Host Tina Fey (Hour 1)

From The Kitchen Sisters | Part of the The Hidden World of Girls series | 54:00

Groundbreaking writer, actress and comedian, Tina Fey comes to Public Radio to host The Hidden World of Girls, two new hour-long Specials inspired by the NPR series heard on Morning Edition and All Things Considered. From the dunes of the Sahara to a slumber party in Manhattan, from the dancehalls of Jamaica to a racetrack in Ramallah, Tina Fey takes us around the world into the secret life of girls and the women they become.

Sound-rich, evocative, funny, and powerful--stories of coming of age, rituals and rites of passage, secret identities. Of women who crossed a line, blazed a trail, changed the tide. These specials are produced by Peabody Award-winning producers, The Kitchen Sisters (Davia Nelson & Nikki Silva), in collaboration with NPR reporters and foreign correspondents, independent producers and listeners around the world.

These two stand-alone Specials are Newscast Compatible, produced with the NPR News Special Programming Clock.

Hour two is available here: http://www.prx.org/pieces/68512

Tina_fey_headshot_200w_small

The Hidden World of Girls
Two New Hours from The Kitchen Sisters and NPR

With Host Tina Fey

The Hidden World of Girls, two new hour-long Specials hosted by Emmy Award-winning writer and actress, Tina Fey. Stories of coming of age, rituals and rites of passage, secret identities—of women who crossed a line, broke a trail, changed the tide. 

Host Tina Fey, star of 30 Rock, author of Bossypants and Saturday Night Live alumna, takes listeners around the world into the secret life of girls—from the dunes of the Sahara to a slumber party in Manhattan, from the dancehalls of Jamaica to a racetrack in Ramallah—and reveals some of her own hidden worlds.  

These two new specials are produced by the Peabody Award-winning Kitchen Sisters, in collaboration with NPR and independent producers from around the world.  Inspired by “The Hidden World of Girls” series heard on Morning Edition and “All Things Considered”, these specials feature the best stories from that series as well as new, never before heard features, interviews and music.  

Lively, sound-rich, evocative, “The Hidden World of Girls” is two hours of stories and more. Stories of girls and the women they become. 

As part of this international collaboration, The Kitchen Sisters opened up The Hidden World of Girls NPR phone line and invited listeners to share their stories of groundbreaking girls and pioneering women. Calls poured in from around the world and these stories and messages thread throughout the hours. Stories in the hour include:

  • The story of The Braveheart Women’s Society: Coming of Age in South Dakota, a journey to a four-day rite of passage ceremony for Sioux girls from the banks of the Missouri River.
  • From the foothills of Dublin, The Hidden World of Traveller Girls. Travellers, the gypsies of Ireland, nomads traveling in caravans, camping by the side of the road. The men live for horses, the girls for their weddings. Big elaborate weddings.
  • We travel to Wayne County, Mississippi into the world of Girls Who Hunt. 
  • We grapple with issues of family, crime, violence and reckoning in the story, Deborah Luster: One Big Self
  • Russia’s Singing Babushkas—a group of elderly women from Buranovo, Russia, who began singing together and who have become a musical sensation at concerts performing Beatles songs.  
  • And science fiction stories of friendship, superpowers and the Beatles.  

Major Funding for The Hidden World of Girls comes from The Corporation for Public Broadcasting and the National Endowment for the Arts, which believes a great nation deserves great art. And from listener contributions to The Kitchen Sisters Productions.

BILLBOARD :59
Incue: My best friend Rosemarie and I had a very involved secret life.
Outcue: Back in a moment.

NEWS HOLE: 1:00-6:00

SEGMENT A: 12:29
Incue: From The Kitchen Sisters and NPR, welcome to The Hidden World of Girls.
Outcue: The Hidden World of Girls continues in a moment.   

BREAK: 19:00-20:00

SEGMENT B (18:59)
Incue: You’re listening to the Hidden World of Girls a collaboration between NPR, The Kitchen Sisters and listeners around the world.
Outcue: Stories from Louisiana, Russia and Venus when we return in a moment.

BREAK: 39:00-40:00 

SEGMENT C (18:59)
Incue: I’m Tina Fey with more stories for NPR’s Hidden World of Girls
Outcue: With The Kitchen Sisters, I’m Tina Fey. MUSIC

The Hidden World of Girls with Host Tina Fey (Hour 2)

From The Kitchen Sisters | Part of the The Hidden World of Girls series | 54:00

Groundbreaking writer, actress and comedian, Tina Fey comes to Public Radio to host The Hidden World of Girls, two new hour-long Specials inspired by the NPR series heard on Morning Edition and All Things Considered. From the dunes of the Sahara to a slumber party in Manhattan, from the dancehalls of Jamaica to a racetrack in Ramallah, Tina Fey takes us around the world into the secret life of girls and the women they become.

Sound-rich, evocative, funny, and powerful--stories of coming of age, rituals and rites of passage, secret identities. Of women who crossed a line, blazed a trail, changed the tide. These specials are produced by Peabody Award-winning producers, The Kitchen Sisters (Davia Nelson & Nikki Silva), in collaboration with NPR reporters and foreign correspondents, independent producers and listeners around the world.

These two stand-alone Specials are Newscast Compatible, produced with the NPR News Special Programming Clock.

Tina_fey_headshot_200w_small

The Hidden World of Girls
Two New Hours from The Kitchen Sisters and NPR

With Host Tina Fey

The Hidden World of Girls, two new hour-long Specials hosted by Emmy Award-winning writer and actress, Tina Fey. Stories of coming of age, rituals and rites of passage, secret identities—of women who crossed a line, broke a trail, changed the tide. 

Host Tina Fey, star of 30 Rock, author of Bossypants and Saturday Night Live alumna, takes listeners around the world into the secret life of girls—from the dunes of the Sahara to a slumber party in Manhattan, from the dancehalls of Jamaica to a racetrack in Ramallah—and reveals some of her own hidden worlds.  

These two new specials are produced by the Peabody Award-winning Kitchen Sisters, in collaboration with NPR and independent producers from around the world.  Inspired by “The Hidden World of Girls” series heard on Morning Edition and “All Things Considered”, these specials feature the best stories from that series as well as new, never before heard features, interviews and music.  

Lively, sound-rich, evocative, “The Hidden World of Girls” is two hours of stories and more. Stories of girls and the women they become. 

As part of this international collaboration, The Kitchen Sisters opened up The Hidden World of Girls NPR phone line and invited listeners to share their stories of groundbreaking girls and pioneering women. Calls poured in from around the world and these stories and messages thread throughout the hours. Stories in this hour include:

  • Horses, Unicorns and Dolphins—a story of girlhood fantasy and aspiration.
  • From Afghanistan we enter The Hidden World of Kandahar Girls—girls and young women going to school, working towards careers, standing up to the threats of the Taliban.
  • We explore the mysterious universe of women’s bodies in the story, Chicken Pills: The Hidden World of Jamaican Girls where homegrown cosmetic treatments and changing ideals of beauty are part of a national debate going on in the music, in the dancehalls and on the streets.
  • Nigerian writer, Chris Abani tells the story of his English-born mother, Daphne Mae Hunt, who enlists him at age 8 to be her translator in rural Nigeria as she goes door-to-door into the villages teaching women the Billings Ovulation Method of birth control.
  • In San Francisco, we step inside the secret identity of Theresa Sparks.
  • We visit Tiina Urm, a young Estonian environmental activist who spearheaded a one-day clean up of her entire country.
  • We meet Amira Al-Sharif from Yemen who came to New York City to document the lives of young American women.
  • We go back stage with singer Janelle Monae and hear about her songwriting process.

Major Funding for The Hidden World of Girls comes from The Corporation for Public Broadcasting and the National Endowment for the Arts, which believes a great nation deserves great art. And from listener contributions to The Kitchen Sisters Productions.

BILLBOARD :59
Incue: We call it the garbage map of Estonia.
Outcue: I’m your host Tina Fey.

NEWS HOLE: 1:00-6:00

SEGMENT A: 12:29
Incue: From The Kitchen Sisters and NPR, Welcome to the Hidden World of Girls.
Outcue: Back in a moment.

BREAK: 19:00-20:00

SEGMENT B (18:59)
Incue: You’re listening to The Hidden World of Girls.
Outcue: Back in a moment with stories from Yemen, the Fillmore and Kingston, Jamaica.

BREAK: 39:00-40:00 

SEGMENT C (18:59)
Incue: NPR’s Hidden World of Girls continues.
Outcue: With The Kitchen Sisters, I’m Tina Fey

HV003- Her Stories

From Hearing Voices | Part of the Hearing Voices series | 54:00

For Women's History Month, stories by, for and of women.

003herstories200_small

Host: Dmae Roberts of MediaRites.org

Stories by, for and of women:

The Kitchen Sisters go to "Tupperware®" parties.

A supermarket checker checks out her life, in ZBS's radio soap Saratoga Springs.

Jenifir returns "Home From Africa" with all 13 Symptoms of Chronic Peace Corps Withdrawal, produced by Jake Warga.

Host Dmae Roberts has a collage of and about "Sisters."

In a new syntax of whispers and words Susan Stone tells the story of "Ruby" and her husbands.

And Sonia Sanchez (produced by Steve Rowland of Shakespeare Is), Tracie Morris, Jill Battson and Meryn Cadell perform short poems.

Music from Tara Key's Ear & Echo.

BIRTH

From Thin Air Media | 56:28

A one-hour public radio documentary about the practices and perceptions of birth in America.

Playing
BIRTH
From
Thin Air Media

Allbelly_small BIRTH is a one-hour public radio and audio documentary about the practices and perceptions of birth in America. Starting with early perceptions, we move through the process of birth beginning before labor, continuing during labor, and following the actual event. With a multiplicity of voices woven with sound we examine the process of birth from an emotional, physical and philosophical perspective. As we move back and forth through time and from person to person, we discover how stories from our lives, history, media, and the medical institution enter into the culmination of the actual birthing process. Birth is a rite of passage through which all human beings pass. Is it the same as it ever was? Why do some women feel deeply empowered by their birth experiences and others feel stripped of their motherhood? Where do our expectations about how we give birth come from, and how do they play out when we approach the event? What is the baby's experience? And what about the father's role? Turn on the television or watch a movie and you're likely to see birth portrayed as an emergency medical procedure. Is this a true depiction of what happens? Perhaps, and yet there are many ways in which to approach the experience. Above all else, we are biologically predisposed to be interested in this topic. Quite simply, when it comes to birth everyone can relate.

Women at Work: A History

From BackStory with the American History Guys | Part of the BackStory with the American History Guys: Full Episodes series | 54:00

This time on BackStory, we’re going to work on stories about women’s work. It’s easy nowadays to roll our eyes at the quaint notion that “a woman’s place is in the home.” But is the real history more complicated than that caricature of bygone values? The Guys will explore the relationship between women’s labor and their legal status as citizens. And they’ll ask… How has the value Americans place on the work that women do — in the home and beyond — changed over time?

Highsmith This time on BackStory, we’re going to work on stories about women’s work. It’s easy nowadays to roll our eyes at the quaint notion that “a woman’s place is in the home.” But is the real history more complicated than that caricature of bygone values? The Guys will explore the relationship between women’s labor and their legal status as citizens. And they’ll ask… How has the value Americans place on the work that women do — in the home and beyond — changed over time?

A Conversation with Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

From RadioArt(r) | Part of the ONLY IN AMERICA: 350 Years of the American Jewish Experience series | 53:48

A rare personal look into the life of a sitting Justice of the Supreme Court, her struggles against gender discrimination, antisemitism and severe illness (Evergreen version - Women's History Month version also available upon request).

Ginsburg_small Ruth Bader Ginsburg's life is a paradigm of the American immigrant experience. In one generation, she rose from the daughter of Jewish immigrants to a seat on the Supreme Court. Born in 1933, she credits much of her early success to the influence of her mother, who gave her two pieces of advice: Always be a lady, and be independent. Justice Ginsburg tells Larry Josephson the surprising story that when she graduated at the top of her class from Columbia Law School in 1959 no one would hire her because, as she says, she was a "woman, Jewish and mother." She also recounts her experience with anti-Semitism: as a child she saw a sign on a boarding house that advised, "no dogs or Jews allowed." This conversation offers a rare personal look into the life of a sitting Justice of the Supreme Court: her struggles against gender discrimination, anti-Semitism and severe illness (her mother died of cancer, both she and her husband survived it). Justice Ginsburg, one of the Court's centrist liberals, explains her philosophy of judicial restraint. A fascinating look at a role model for women and minorities, as well as an American success story of upward mobility. Highly topical given the two recent vacancies on the Court. Justice Ginsburg is possibly a swing vote on the new Court. The special is taken from the forthcoming series, "Only in America: A Celebration of the American Jewish Experience," a year-long project to celebrate the 350th Anniversary of the landing of the first Jews in New Amsterdam in September, 1654. A number of specials will be distributed throughout the year, and a six-part series will be distributed in the fall. The program is available in two versions: Evergreen (currently on the server) and A Women's History Month Special (with alternate introduction, available upon request). Both are news-friendly and contain a one-minute cutaway at midpoint. Stations that do not with to run the news can start the program at 6:00.

The Black Experience

From West Virginia Public Broadcasting | 01:57:00

Dr. Della Taylor Hardman made it her mission to talk to influential and promising African Americans inside and outside of West Virginia. Her interviews became the local Charleston radio show "The Black Experience." A professor, artist, poet, columnist, and photographer, the title radio host was just one of many hats she wore. Narrated by Peabody award-winning journalist Charlayne Hunter-Gault.

Della_brown_hardman__phd_001_small Dr. Della Taylor Hardman made it her mission to talk to influential and promising African Americans inside and outside of West Virginia. Her interviews became the local Charleston radio show "The Black Experience." A professor, artist, poet, columnist, and photographer, the title radio host was just one of many hats she wore.

Narrated by Peabody award-winning journalist Charlayne Hunter-Gault, this documentary revisits some of Dr. Hardman’s interviews from that time and offers reflections on her life from friends and family. 

Interviewees include Ralph Abernathy, Ann Baker, William Warfield, Gwendolyn Brooks, Scatman Crothers, Clint Thomas, Mary Thomas, Dr. Margaret Cyrus Mills, Carmen McRae, and Dorothy West.

Major funding for The Black Experience comes from the West Virginia Humanities Council.  Additional funding provided by West Virginia American Water.

Peace Talks Radio: Nobel Peace Laureate Jody Williams (59:00 / 54:00)

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 58:30

A conversation with Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Jody Williams, the leader of the International Campaign to Ban Land Mines. Also in the hour, the directors of 3 community peace and justice centers talk about their missions.

Jodywilliams_small Peace Talks Radio. The series on peacemaking and nonviolent conflict resolution. From the recent "Building a Culture of Peace Conference" in Santa Fe, we present highlights from an address and a one-on-one interview with Nobel Peace Laureate Jody Williams. Ms. Williams talks with us about human rights and international law, the role of civil society in international diplomacy and individual initiative. She received the 1997 Nobel Peace Prize jointly with the campaign that she led, the International Campaign to Ban Landmines. Also, we explore the role of Peace and Justice Centers in communities by talking with directors of peace centers in Albuquerque and Las Vegas, New Mexico and Burlington, Vermont. The program is suitable for stations either carrying a newscast or note. Newscast stations should use the PART 3 marked for the 54:00 Version. Stations NOT running a newscast should use the PART 3 marked for the 59:00 Version. PARTS 1 + 2 are the same for both versions. There is a one minute music bed at the end of both PARTS 1 + 2 for local announcements.

A Conversation with Mairead Maguire (Peace Talks Radio) 59:00 / 54:00

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 59:01

This time on Peace Talks Radio, a conversation with Northern Ireland Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Mairead Maguire. Also talk about middle school mediation programs and nonviolent communication skills.

Mairead-maguire_small

This time on Peace Talks Radio, a 2006 conversation with Northern Ireland Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Mairead Maguire. Mairead Corrigan Maguire founded the Community of the Peace People in 1976 along with Betty Williams and Ciaran McKeown. Mairead was the aunt of the three Maguire children who were hit by a runaway car after its driver was shot by a soldier. The deaths prompted a series of marches throughout Northern Ireland and further afield, all demanding an end to the violence plaguing her country at the time. Mairead and Betty went on to win the Nobel Peace Prize in 1976.

In this program, Maguire recalls her peace work and talks with host Carol Boss about how the principles of nonviolence can be applied to conflicts around the world and in daily life.

In part two of the program, previously un-aired Peace Talks Radio conversations about mediation programs for middle school students, a verbal technology called non-violent communication, efforts to institutionalize peace in our governing bodies and the quest for inner peace in a post-9/11 world.  .

What is a Wife?

From Philosophy Talk | 53:59

Is the concept of 'wife' an outmoded relic of our chauvinistic past?

Kenjohn_small The concept of a wife has been embedded in cultures, religious practices, social customs and economic patterns of wildly different sorts. Is there a core concept of what it is to be a wife? Is it a good concept, or one that deserves to be thrown on the trash heap of intellectual history because it perpetrates corrosive stereotypes of women? What conceptions of being a wife do Americans have today? John and Ken espouse their views with Marilyn Yalom, author of A History of the Wife.

Shades of Gray

From Jonathan Mitchell | 58:27

An hour-long audio mosaic about abortion in America.

2_small Pro-choice. Pro-life. Most people have already chosen sides in the ongoing debate, so why revisit the issue? Shades of Gray shares a range of stories told by people young and old who have been directly affected by abortion, instead of the polemics of irreconcilable extremes. It's a carefully crafted audio mosaic and a stark portrayal of the intensely personal nature of our relationship with abortion. Originally distributed nationally by PRI in January, 2003 Winner of the 2004 Golden Reel for National Documentary.

PRX homepage image from Shutterstock

The Story of Lata

From Outer Voices | 53:00

Women and the revival of traditional Polynesian sailing in the Solomon Islands.

Nifiloliwoman_small The Story of Lata, by Outer Voices, explores the efforts by the people of a remote part of Solomon Islands to preserve their traditional boat building culture and navigation. It explores traditional polynesian navigation in a region where the technology and knowledge is still intact. We listen to the older women who remember the old days of sailing, and who consider their role were this tradition to be revived. And we also consider the reality of modern life, which they are slowly being required to adapt to. How feasible is it to revive these ancient arts, which take time to learn? Behind the whole story is the myth of Lata, which guides us into a profound understanding of the limitlessness of time and space so necessary to the navigators behind the polynesian navigation, and consider that our modern world could do well to be informed by the patience and durability which it required.

The Feminine Mystique: Changing U.S. Women's History

From KSFR | Part of the Equal Time with Martha Burk series | 28:27

Series host Martha Burk interviews New York Times op-ed columnist Gail Collins on the 50th anniversary of the publication of Betty Friedan's The Feminine Mystique.

Friedan_small Series host Martha Burk interviews New York Times op-ed columnist Gail Collins on the 50th anniversary of the publication of Betty Friedan's The Feminine Mystique.

Collins, who wrote the introduction to the 50th anniversary edition of the book, talks about the impact the book had on changing the culture and galvanizing women nationawide.  She also explores Friedan's own background and personality, and the conditions that made her book one of the most impactful of the 20th century.

First KSFR broadcast March 9, 2013. 
See timing and cues.  

They Don’t Call Her Mother Earth for Nothing: Women Re-imagining the World-Hour Long Version

From Bioneers | Part of the Celebrate Women's History Month with the Bioneers series | 58:30

Transformational women leaders are restoring societal balance by showing us how to reconnect relationships - not only among people - but between people and the natural world. This conversation among diverse women leaders provides a window into the depths of what it means to restore the balance between our masculine and feminine selves to bring about wholeness, justice and true restoration of people and planet.

Image_preview_small

Join Alice Walker, Jean Shinoda Bolen, Nina Simons, Sarah Crowell, Joanna Macy and Akaya Windwood to imagine a future where women, children, men and the planet can thrive.

Conversations with Women Making History/ Nancy Pelosi & Zainab Salbi

From KSFR | Part of the Equal Time with Martha Burk series | 56:48

Martha Burk interviews Nancy Pelosi, first female Speaker of the House, and Zainab Salbi, best selling author and founder of Women for Women International.

Pelosi_small Nancy Pelosi is serving her 25th year in the U.S. House of Representatives, and is currently serving as Democratic Leader.  Her historic election as the first Speaker was a landmark, and her tenure has been called one of the most successful.  She explores her 25 years of service, obstacles for women in politics, what's at stake for women in 2012, the war on birth control, child care, and how to create more jobs.  

Zainab Salbi is world renowned as founder of Women for Women International, the leading organization aiding women in war zones.  She is the best-selling author of Between Two Worlds: Escape From Tyranny: Growing Up in the Shadow of Saddam.  She describes her childhood in Iraq and living conditions when her father was Saddam Hussein's personal pilot, her arranged marriage at 20, and escaping to start over after the Gulf War.  Salbi also talks about her humanitarian work, and the current situation for women in Afghanistan.

Time clocks are included for individual segments or full hour.  Stations may air individual segments or full hour. 

Lady Bird Johnson: Legacy of a First Lady

From Joe Bevilacqua | Part of the Joe Bevilacqua Documentaries series | 58:01

This award-winning documentary chronicles her life and times.

Ladybirdpainting_small The 2008 Presidential election marks the first time a woman, Hillary Clinton is being seriously considered. Lady Bird Johnson was a pioneer First Lady who forged the way for this historic election. This award-winning documentary, produced by Joe Bevilacqua, chronicles her life and times. One of the 15 most licensed programs on The Public Radio Exchange, LADY BIRD JOHNSON: LEGACY OF A FIRST LADY is an award-winning one-hour radio documentary examines the challenges and achievements of this extraordinary woman, and a perfect hour to run this weekend. 30 and 60 second promos are also included. This one-hour radio documentary combines never-before-released archive audio, gleaned from thousands of hours of recordings housed at the Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum, period news broadcasts, private conversations with Lyndon Baines Johnson, and the words of Lady Bird Johnson from an interview that has never before been released to the public. You can find this series in short module form for easy programming at: http://www.prx.org/series/24213 Producer Joe Bevilacqua spent nearly five months listening to the rare tapes and traveled to Washington, D.C. to interview Mrs. Johnson's colleagues and friends. The program features Lyndon Johnson Administration staffers Liz Carpenter, Bess Abell, and Nash Castro, Washington Post owner Katherine Graham, Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum Director Harry Middleton, Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center Director Robert Glass Breunig; Lady Bird biographer Jan Jarboe Russell, and First Ladies Betty Ford and Barbara Bush. Other voices heard on the program include Kirk Douglas and Helen Hayes reading from LBJ and Lady Bird's love letters. The production was produced in association with KUT Radio in Austin, TX, and overseen by a panel of scholars and experts including Lewis Gould, retired University of Texas at Austin Professor of History; Walt Rostow, UT Professor Emeritus, Elspeth Rostow, former dean of the UT LBJ School of Public Affairs; Carl Anthony, Washington, D.C. historian; and Don Carleton, director, The Center for American History at UT. ***** Informational, Inspiring This is an excellent, uplifting journey through Lady Bird Johnson's life, and her growth and transition to first lady under tragic conditions. It's wonderful to hear her voice, rendered here in excerpts from interviews she's given and speeches she's made. It is especially poignant to hear a portion of her first audio diary entry, made the day after JFK's assassination. Nuanced choices of music are a production plus, but the strength is in the spoken word. Wisely chosen excerpts create a rich experience. The hour contains a wide range of voices, from historians to those who worked with her or know her, and they pinpoint her influence on LBJ, and on the capital, and the nation -- particularly in the areas of environment, race, and education. She truly is a force for good. (Reviewer) (Editorial Board) Transom Editors , Atlantic Public Media December 4, 2003

Liza Minnelli

From South Carolina ETV Radio | Part of the Song Travels with Michael Feinstein News Friendly Version series | 53:00

Born into Hollywood royalty, Liza Minnelli has made her own name on the stage and screen. Her role in the 1972 film version of the Broadway musical Cabaret made her an international sensation and won her the Academy Award for Best Actress. Recently she has made inroads into TV’s Arrested Development and recorded with alternative rockers My Chemical Romance. Minnelli joins dear friend Feinstein for an enlightening discussion of her life and rare insight into her approach to song.

Songtravelslogo_small Song Travels is a one-hour series distributed by NPR and hosted by the renowned "Ambassador of the Great American Songbook," Michael Feinstein. As host and artistic director, Feinstein uncovers the intimate journey singers and songs take with one another, each changing the other through the course of a lifetime.  For Feinstein, American music is really a travelogue, with art that exists only because it has traveled through artists' lives, generations, and passions:

"In this series, we talk about songs, How important they are in our lives, how they've changed our lives and how sometimes they make life worth living."
-Michael Feinstein

Feinstein welcomes a new guest each week to explore the genre of American Popular Song, examining how these great songs have evolved through the years, changing with each interpretation and artist.

Each program features an even mix of ½ insightful conversation to ½ in-studio or recorded musical performances of  guests and Feinstein.