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Playlist: Fourth of July

Compiled By: PRX Editors

 Credit: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/bestrated1/">Timothy K. Hamilton</a>
Image by: Timothy K. Hamilton 
Curated Playlist

All the ingredients you need.

These are picks chosen by PRX editorial staff. You can see all Independence Day radio on PRX by using our search.

Hour (49:00-1:00:00)

July 4th with Leroy Anderson and the Boston Pops

From The WFMT Radio Network | 58:29

The WFMT Radio Network is very pleased to present Leroy Anderson and the Boston Pops for your July 4th holiday pleasure!

Landerson_small

This special will be available free of charge to all affiliate stations for one broadcast between June 1 and July 31, 2017.

For more information contact:

Estlin Usher at eusher@wfmt.com (p) 773-279-2112 
Tony Macaluso at tmacaluso@wfmt.com (p) 773-279-2114


This radio special features Leroy Anderson, America’s most popular light music composer, and the Boston Pops Orchestra, which premiered many of his short orchestral miniatures. This special explores how the two came together to make music that will be remembered for generations.

Leroy Anderson’s music, including Bugler’s Holiday, Fiddle-Faddle and The Typewriter, are heard with the Boston Pops Orchestra, with conductor Keith Lockhart playing host.  Also heard are Anderson’s classic Boston Pops arrangements of George Gershwin, Richard Rodgers and Meredith Willson.  Seiji Ozawa, John Williams and Leroy Anderson all comment on the music.

Leroy Anderson and the Boston Pops is produced by Kurt Anderson, the composer’s son, and is distributed by the WFMT Radio Network to radio stations nationwide free of charge to all stations.  Kurt has produced three other public radio special programs on Leroy Anderson that were distributed by National Public Radio and WFMT.  This program is underwritten in part by the Leroy Anderson Foundation.

Independence Daze: A History of July Fourth [rebroadcast]

From BackStory with the American History Guys | Part of the BackStory with the American History Guys: Full Episodes series | 54:00

In the early days of our nation, July Fourth wasn’t an official holiday at all. In fact, it wasn’t until 1938 that it became a paid day-off. So how did the Fourth become the holiest day on our secular calendar? This episode offers some answers. With perspective from guests and taking questions from listeners, Peter, Ed, and Brian explore the origins of July Fourth. They highlight the holiday's radical roots, look at how the Declaration's meaning has changed over time, and consider how the descendants of slaves embraced the Declaration's message of liberty and equality.

July4 In the early days of our nation, July Fourth wasn’t an official holiday at all. In fact, it wasn’t until 1938 that it became a paid day-off. So how did the Fourth become the holiest day on our secular calendar? This episode offers some answers. With perspective from guests and taking questions from listeners, Peter, Ed, and Brian explore the origins of July Fourth. They highlight the holiday's radical roots, look at how the Declaration's meaning has changed over time, and consider how the descendants of slaves embraced the Declaration's message of liberty and equality.

HV018- Stars and Bars

From Hearing Voices | Part of the Hearing Voices series | 54:00

Celebrating America with flags, fireworks and summer festivals.

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Host: Larry Massett of HearingVoices.com

Celebrating America with Flags and Festivals, featuring:

Recitations and reflections on “The Pledge” of Allegiance” and “War vs. Peace” (by Joe Frank).

The annual “Rainbow Family” migration into the Montana forest on July Fourth — their day of prayer for peace (produced by Barrett Golding, photos by Chad Harder).

A town that covets their title of the “Armpit of America” — host Larry Massett welcomes you to Battle Mountain, Nevada.

Mississippi moonshine, barbecued goat and old-time Fife & Drum at “Otha Turner’s Afrosippi Picnic” with producer Ben Adair.

America: Our Country, Our Music

From Charlie Warren | 57:59

Music and comments that take your listeners into the heart of America, including a powerful presentation of our 200 year old national anthem.

Uppercutimages-gettyimages76528622_small Familiar and forgotten songs, many not normally associated with Independence Day, that highlight the people, issues, and ideas that create America, supported by insightful commentary.

After the program introduction, you'll hear a dramatic rendition of The Star Spangled Banner, accompanied by rare facts about the origin of its words and music.

The Church of Pancakes

From KUFM - Montana Public Radio | Part of the Notes From the Huntley Project series | 58:45

Emotion battles ethics in this action-packed caper. Nine-year-old Jaybird and his partner in crime, Kenny, love the Fourth of July — the sound of a burning fuse and the smell of gunpowder. But coming up with the perfect plan to rob the local fireworks stand is going to be harder than they expected.

Cop_fireworks-stand_small In Notes from the Huntley Project , Jay Kettering's comedic and thought-provoking radio series, a middle-aged man reflects on a childhood spent in small-town space-time, where love meets mysticism and adventure meets imagination.

Episode I:  My Dad and Pre-Socratic Thought

Episode II:  How I Learned to Tell Time

Episode III:  The Church of Pancakes

Emotion battles ethics in this action-packed caper. Nine-year-old Jaybird and his partner in crime, Kenny, love the sound of a burning fuse and the smell of gunpowder—on the Fourth of July, they get high just inhaling the air. But coming up with the perfect plan to rob the local fireworks stand is going to be harder than they expected. Perhaps because in their world, moon landings and tripping on psychedelic dog food are no more unusual than becoming fireproof with a kiss. And the instigator of this crime of passion, the bewitching ten-year-old Mexican migrant worker, Carlita Milkey, only makes the task of distinguishing the real from the imagined all the more difficult. Listen in as the fifty-three-year-old narrator recalls his nine-year-old self, revealing what a kid will do for love and what the love of a memory can do to the heart and mind of a storyteller.

The Church of Pancakes was written by Jay Kettering
Directed by Teresa Waldorf

Performed by:
David Mills-Low: Narrator, Jaybird
Anne-Marie Williams: Carlita Milkey
Cody Hysolp: Mr. Oltroggie, Kenny Finch
Reid Reimers: Dad, Adolphus Johansson aka Apple Juice
Teresa Waldorf: Nardo Aquino, random kids

Recorded by Beth Anne Austein in the studios of Montana Public Radio
Edited and produced by Chérie Newman

HV011- Road Trip

From Hearing Voices | Part of the Hearing Voices series | 54:00

An hour of travelers' tales for your long weekend, from spending a day with an ex-KGB spy, to hitchhiking across the U.S., and more.

011roadtrip200_small This is an episode in the series Hearing Voices from NPR now being offered as a standalone special.

Host: Larry Massett of Hearing Voices

Summary: Host Larry Massett spends a "Long Day on the Road" with ex-KGB in the Republic of Georgia. Scott Carrier starts in Salt Lake and ends on the Atlantic in this cross-country "Hitchhike." Lemon Jelly adds beats to the life of a "Ramblin' Man." The band Richmond Fontaine sends musical postcards from the flight of "Walter On the Lam." And Mark Allen tells a tale of a tryst with a "Kinko's Crackhead."

Listener info and links:
http://hearingvoices.com/news/2009/05/hv011-road-trip/

0:15 On-Air Promo Text: This week on Hearing Voices: "Road Trip," Travelers’ Tales, it's a Road Trip, with ex-KGB in the Republic of Georgia, and a cross-county hitchhike.

America the Beautiful (Hour Long Version)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes series | 53:56

An American music and literature hour begins with patriotic musical performances by the likes of Marian Anderson, Paul Robeson, Marvin Gaye, and Jimi Hendrix, and concludes with in-depth discussions of the lives and literature of Walt Whitman and Edgar Alan Poe.

America_the_beautiful_small From Marian Anderson’s 1939 concert at the Lincoln Memorial to Marvin Gaye’s singing of the National Anthem at the NBA Finals, the theme of patriotism can be heard throughout African American music. Benjamin Ross offers selections from this rich musical heritage. Also: Published in 1946, The Street by Ann Petry was the first million-selling novel by an African American author. Keith Clark says Petry deserves to be in the pantheon of other great American writers like James Baldwin and Toni Morrison. Plus: Luisa Igloria has written one poem a day, every day, for the last three years. She talks about finding inspiration from the Philippines, where she was raised; from her daughters; and from, of all places, Christopher Reeve.

Later in the show: In 1862, Poet Walt Whitman went to Fredericksburg, Virginia, searching for his brother George who had been wounded in a Civil War battle. Mara Scanlon and Brady Earnhart say Whitman was so moved by the carnage he found that he worked as a nurse for the rest of the war. Also featured: 19th -century poet and author Edgar Allan Poe is still considered the master of the macabre. Jerome McGann says Poe, whose influence is probably unmatched by any American author, was more charming and humorous than his famous dark fiction suggests.

Eddie's Attic July 4th Radio Show 001

From Bob Ephlin | Part of the Eddie's Attic Presents series | 59:00

This is a special show in the series, featuring live recordings of July 4th-themed songs from songwriters Kevn Kinney, Alice Peacock, Dave Alvin, Gretchen Peters, Brian Vander Ark, Sugarland, Darrell Scott, Antje Duvekot, Kevin Montgomery, Matthew Ryan, Shawn Mullins, and Meg Hutchinson.

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A multi-episode, hour-long radio show featuring unique live performances from accomplished and aspiring performing songwriters, from a variety of genres, hosted by the founder of Eddie's Attic, Eddie Owen.

For over 19 years, Decatur Georgia's Eddie's Attic has been known as one of America's finest listening rooms for acclaimed and aspiring performing songwriters. Eddie's Attic has developed a multi-episode, 59 minute radio show featuring recordings from unique live performances on their stage - with excellent sound quality. Attic founder Eddie Owen hosts Eddie's Attic Presents in his low-key, but memorable Southern style. Each program features a combination of artists your audience has heard, and some they may not have, from a variety of genres, and in a variety of configurations, from solo singers to full bands. The shows have been assembled and mastered by Crawford Communications, ensuring a professional presentation.

Eddie's Attic has been the springboard for an amazing number of Atlanta-area artists who have gone on to achieve national attention such as John Mayer, Sugarland, The Indigo Girls, Shawn Mullins, Matthew Perryman Jones, and Michelle Malone. The list of nationally known talents that have played the Attic stage is also impressive, and includes John Gorka, Sheryl Crow, Ani DiFranco, Ed Roland, Brandi Carlile, Al Stewart, David Wilcox, Bill Mallonee, Kevn Kinney, Edwin McCain, Richard Shindell, Ellis Paul, Patty Larkin, Malcomb Holcombe, Darrell Scott, Glen Phillips, Billy Joe Shaver, Pierce Pettis, Kate Campbell, Charlie Louvin, Cheryl Wheeler, Cliff Eberhardt, Lowen & Navarro, Marc Cohn, India.Arie, Alejandro Escovedo, Chris Smither, Loudon Wainwright, and so many more.

Eddie's Attic Presents is a music variety show, featuring talented acts in Folk, Americana, Rock, Pop, Roots, Bluegrass, Country, Celtic, Blues, Jazz, Soul......and most combinations in-between. It's an entertaining mix that feels right at home adjacent to your own local programs or alongside nationally syndicated programs. Each show features approximately 12 songwriters from a variety of genres, performing their songs live during a recent Eddie's Attic performance. Eddie tells you alittle bit about each artist and often relates interesting anecdotes from their performances or backgrounds.

Please note that each 59 minute show features 30 seconds for local underwriting, fed with a music bed, so that you can use this slot as needed or let go as-is for ease of operation.

Humankind: An Informed Republic

From Humankind | 59:00

America's founders knew their democracy required informed citizens, but is quality journalism now threatened by the decline of print newspapers? With Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, Pulitzer-winning historians.

Informed_republic_wide_small America's founders recognized that that without a king, the fledgling nation would need an informed citizenry -- or their bold experiment in democracy would fail. So in early America the government subsidized newspapers, established the postal system to facilitate information flow and drew up plans for public education. But now in the digital age, does the demise of newspapers threaten citizens' access to quality journalistic information? Does remarkably low civic knowledge by average Americans weaken the fabric of democracy? This new one-hour Humankind documentary features retired Supreme Court justice Sandra Day O'Connor, Pulitzer Prize-winning historians Gordon Wood and Annette Gordon-Reed, new media analyst Robert McChesney, voices of tourists at the Newseum, and others. Hosted by David Freudberg and produced in association with WGBH/Boston.

Travels with Mike: In Search of America 50 Years After Steinbeck

From The Center for Documentary Studies | 54:00

A one-hour special revisiting Steinbeck's iconic book, Travels with Charley -- published 50 years ago, in 1962 -- and journeying into today's America through the eyes of contemporary artists. Segments in Sag Harbor, N.Y.; New Orleans; North Dakota; Spokane, Wash.; Humboldt County, Cal., and Monterey, Cal. Produced by John Biewen of CDS and hosted by Al Letson of State of the Re:Union.

P1130283_copy_-_version_2_small The writer John Steinbeck climbed into a pickup-camper that he’d named Rocinante, after Don Quixote’s horse, and started driving. He left his home on Long Island with a set of questions that could, he wrote, be lumped into a single one: “What are Americans like today?” With his poodle Charley by his side, the novelist traveled 10,000 miles in three months, making a loop from one coast to the other and back again. His account of the journey, Travels with Charley In Search of America, was published in 1962, the same year Steinbeck won the Nobel Prize for Literature.

Perhaps even more than Steinbeck could grasp at the time, the United States was at a turning point. He drove along an historical seam between one era and another, one kind of country and another. Half a century later, it seems fair to say that America finds itself at another crossroads.
Travels with Mike retraces Steinbeck’s steps, not with a poodle but with a stereo microphone (i.e., Mike). Producer John Biewen went to key locations on Steinbeck’s itinerary and in each place collaborated with an artist who’s deeply grounded in that place. Travels with Mike comprises a series of conversations, across time, between a great American writer of the last century and a diverse array of contemporary artists — conversations about issues, place, and the spirit of the country.

This special program is hosted by Al Letson, host of the NPR/PRX show, State of the Re:Union. Travels with Mike is a production of the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University.

Independence Day 2011 - The Founding of America 11-26

From All Classical Public Media | Part of the The Score with Edmund Stone series | 59:00

This week on The Score with Edmund Stone, The Founding of America.

Edmund_for_the_score_ad_8-2012_small This week on The Score with Edmund Stone, The Founding of America, with scores from films about our nation's beginnings including The Madness of King George, Jefferson in Paris, John Adams, and The Last of the Mohicans on the next edition of The Score.

Stephen Foster: America's Bard

From WQXR | 58:57

It’s hard to imagine American music without the work of Stephen Collins Foster. Foster was born on July 4, 1826 – fifty years to the day after the Declaration of Independence was signed. In 19th century America, popular songs were churned out by the dozens, but no other composer of the day wrote as many great songs with as much sticking power as Foster. We all grew up singing Oh, Susannah, Beautiful Dreamer, Jeanie With the Light Brown Hair, Old Folks at Home … the list goes on and on.

Wqxr_logo_nofreq_small

It’s hard to imagine American music without the work of Stephen Collins Foster.  Foster was born on July 4, 1826 – fifty years to the day after the Declaration of Independence was signed.  In 19th century America, popular songs were churned out by the dozens, but no other composer of the day wrote as many great songs with as much sticking power as Foster.  We all grew up singing Oh, Susannah, Beautiful Dreamer, Jeanie With the Light Brown Hair, Old Folks at Home … the list goes on and on.  

 

This one-hour program, written and hosted by Naomi Lewin of WQXR, includes those songs, and many others – plus instrumental numbers.  Among the performers: Marilyn Horne, Thomas Hampson, Itzhak Perlman, and Leopold Stokowski leading the Philadelphia Orchestra.


The show times out to 58:00.  It’s in three segments, each with an outcue, enabling two:30 I.D. breaks within the program.

 

Here is the playlist:


BEAUTIFUL DREAMER: OMEGA 3005, Track 1 (3:29)
Benjamin Luxon, baritone
Instrumental ensemble conducted by Carl Davis

 

TIOGA WALTZ: ProPiano 224535, Track 16 (2:20)
Sara Davis Buechner, piano

 

CAMPTOWN RACES: London 417 242, Track 4 (2:14)
Marilyn Horne, mezzo-soprano
English Chamber Orchestra conducted by Carl Davis

 

OH, SUSANNAH!
Philadelphia Orchestra conducted by Leopold Stokowski

 

JEANIE WITH THE LIGHT BROWN HAIR: London 417 242, Track 1 (4:17)
Marilyn Horne, mezzo-soprano
Osian Ellis, harp

 

MY WIFE IS A MOST KNOWING WOMAN: Angel 54621, Track 14 (3:47)
Thomas Hampson, baritone
David Alpher, piano

 

SOIRÉE POLKA: Centaur 2250, Track 4 (1:49)
Noel Lester, piano

 

SWEETLY SHE SLEEPS, MY ALICE FAIR: Angel 54621, Track 11 (3:27)
Thomas Hampson, baritone
David Alpher, piano

 

IF YOU’VE ONLY GOT A MOUSTACHE: London 417 242, Track 3 (3:01)
Marilyn Horne, mezzo-soprano
English Chamber Orchestra conducted by Carl Davis

 

WE ARE COMING FATHER ABRAAM: Albany 1056, Track 2 (4:11)
Stephen Swanson, baritone
David Gompper, piano

 

WAS MY BROTHER IN THE BATTLE?: Nonesuch 79158, Track 3 (3:54)
Jan DeGaetani, mezzo-soprano
Gilbert Kalish, melodion

 

OLD FOLKS AT HOME (arr. Heifetz): EMI 56602, Track 9 (3:43)
Itzhak Perlman, violin
Samuel Sanders, piano

 

OLD FOLKS QUADRILLES: Arabesque 6679, Tracks 23-27 (4:01)
Paula Robison, flute
Krista Bennion Feeney and Calvin Wiersma, violin
John Feeny, double bass
Samuel Sanders, piano

 

MY OLD KENTUCKY HOME: Arabesque 6679, Track 28 (2:31)
Paula Robison, flute

 

O Beautiful! American Music

From William Zukof | 58:50

New American music for voices by Meredith Monk, William Bolcom, Tania Leon, Matthew Harris, Eric Salzman, Robert Dennis, Billy Joel, Elliot Z. Levine and Gayla Morgan. Interviews with the composers and arrangers are woven into the show. From the Western Wind.

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O Beautiful! American Music
The Western Wind, America's longest running professional vocal ensemble has created a repertory of vibrant new works for voices.  O Beautiful! American Music presents music by Meredith Monk, William Bolcom, Tania Leon, Matthew Harris, Eric Salzman, Robert Dennis, Billy Joel, Elliot Z. Levine and Gayla Morgan.  Interviews with the composers and arrangers are woven into the show.  The title is taken from Gayla Morgan's brilliant pastiche of "America the Beautiful" and "Rte.66" with an allusion to "I Like to be in America" from West Side Story. It  captures the exuberance and inclusiveness of our time.

Freedom Jazz!

From WFIU | Part of the Night Lights Classic Jazz: Specials series | 59:01

A uniquely jazzy tribute to the spirit of liberty and America, featuring music by Duke Ellington, Miles Davis, Jackie McLean, Ray Charles and more.

Playing
Freedom Jazz!
From
WFIU

U

Perfect for the Fourth of July or other celebratory national holidays!  “Freedom Jazz!” offers a uniquely jazzy tribute to the spirit of liberty and America, featuring music by Duke Ellington, Miles Davis, Jackie McLean, Ray Charles and more. 

Compact Discoveries 156: Independence Day

From Fred Flaxman | Part of the Compact Discoveries series | 57:30

July 4th selections from Fred Flaxman.

Cdslogo2inch_small

Designed for broadcast on or shortly before July 4, this program features off-the-beaten-track music for the occasion, including Morton Gould's American Salute, his "Star-Spangled Overture" from American Ballads; "Celebration - Fourth of July" from Star-Spangled Symphony by Don Gillis; Henri Vieuxtemps' Yankee Doodle Variations; Ruggero Leoncavallo's Yankee March; Three American Dances by Henry Gilbert; The Union by Louis Moreau Gottschalk; and America Medley by Leonard Bernstein.

Compact Discoveries 105: The Dream of America

From Fred Flaxman | Part of the Compact Discoveries series | 58:00

Peter Boyer's "Ellis Island: The Dream of America" is featured, performed by the Philharmonia Orchestra conducted by the composer. From Fred Flaxman.

Cdslogo2inch_small Peter Boyer's "Ellis Island: The Dream of America" is featured, performed by the Philharmonia Orchestra conducted by the composer with a cast of well-known actors reading texts from the Ellis Island Oral History Project. The hour concludes with Belgian composer Henri Vieuxtemps' "Yankee Doodle Variations" and James Raphael's piano arrangement of John Philip Sousa's "The Stars and Stripes Forever." Although this program was designed for use on or around July 4, it can be used anytime as Independence Day is not actually mentioned. Complete script available here and at www.compactdiscoveries.com.


Half-Hour (24:00-30:00)

The USA Plan

From Hearing Voices | Part of the The Plan series | 29:06

An all-American festival of fireworks-fueled patriotic fury. From Hearing Voices.

Plan2church_small This week The Plan celebrates America and Americans: PLAYLIST: ARTIST | AUDIO | ALBUM (*=PRX piece) 1. Barrett Golding | The Pledge* | HearingVoices.com 2. Guillermo Gomez-Pena | PSA: Pledge | My Life in the Bush of Ghosts 3. Crossing the BLVD | Names | CrossingTheBLVD.org 4. The Books | Be Good To Them Always | Lost and Safe 5. Firesign Theatre | US Plus | NPR "April Fools" ads 6. Barrett Golding | Rainbow Family | HearingVoices.com Audio promo is 0:30.

Shortcuts To Freedom

From Peter Bochan | Part of the Shortcuts series | 29:02

July 4th Classic

Rainbowstage_m_small A July 4th Special with George Carlin, Martin Luther King Jr, the cast of "West Side Story", Lenny Bruce, John Wayne, James Cagney, Ronald Reagan, Noel Coward, Stan Freberg, Van Dyke Parks, Johnny Horton, Father Guido Sarducci, Ry Cooder, Tex Ritter, Melvin Van Peebles, LBJ, Richard Nixon, Ed Sanders, Jimi Hendrix, Paul Simon, The Bonzo Dog Band, The Everly Brothers, Paul Frees, Eugene Ormandy, Chicago, Jack Armstrong "The All-American Boy" and Jay & The Americans... First aired and produced in 1974

"What is American?"

From Littleglobe | 27:40

In this edition of Audio Revolution! hosts Gabriel Rima and Savannah Chapman-Martinez take you into the depths of identity: What does it mean to be American? Who gets to be American and who doesn’t? What are the freedoms and privileges American’s have? And, do all American’s have those freedoms? And what does it mean to be both American and another ethnicity and/or culture? These are some of the questions that get explored in this intense and immense Audio Revolution!

5423820887_efab75a8bd_small In this edition of Audio Revolution! hosts Gabriel Rima and Savannah Chapman-Martinez take you into the depths of identity: What does it mean to be American? Who gets to be American and who doesn’t? What are the freedoms and privileges American’s have? And, do all American’s have those freedoms? And what does it mean to be both American and another ethnicity and/or culture? These are some of the questions that get explored in this intense and immense Audio Revolution!

1776

From Cambridge Forum | 28:55

Historian David McCullough portrays the tumult and uncertainty of 1776 and shows how the courage and perseverance of a few dedicated men were responsible for the success of the American revolutionary experiment. From Cambridge Forum.

Playing
1776
From
Cambridge Forum

1776_small Historian David McCullough brings to life the tumult and uncertainty of 1776 and shows how the courage and perseverance of a few dedicated men were responsible for the success of the American revolutionary experiment. In his new book, "1776," McCullough recreates the context of life-and-death military struggle that heralded the birth of the United States of America. Recorded in June 2005, not yet broadcast.

Marching for Change: Street Bands in the U.S.

From Making Contact | 29:00

Look at how political marching bands are stirring up public spaces, from the streets, to supermarkets, to your Facebook feed.

Image_small There's an Emma Goldman saying that goes something like this: "If I can't dance, I don't want your revolution!" Well, in the past decade, more and more political marching bands have been invigorating social movements. In some cases, they're the protest themselves. On this edition, we look at how musicians are stirring up public spaces; from the streets, to supermarkets to your facebook feed.

NOTE FOR STATIONS:  You can listen or purchase any of the 3 individual segments from this show, if you are looking for something shorter:
http://www.prx.org/pieces/52985-marching-to-the-beat-of-their-own-drums
Marching to the Beat of their Own Drums 9:49

http://www.prx.org/pieces/52990-street-bands-bring-protest-to-the-internet-through
Street Bands Bring Protest to the Internet through Flash Mobs 10:54

http://www.prx.org/pieces/52987-the-life-and-death-of-the-infernal-noise-brigade

The Life and Death of the Infernal Noise Brigade 8:26

Featuring:

Sarah Valentine, musician, Hungry March Band; Daniel Lang-Levitsky, musician, Rude Mechanical Orchestra; Michele Hardesty, founding (and former) member of the Rude Mechanical Orchestra; Jenna Barrett, musician, Infernal Noise Brigade, I-Ching, musician, Infernal Noise Brigade; Grey Filastine, musician, Infernal Noise Brigade; Ronica Sanyal, vocalist and musician, Infernal Noise Brigade; Jamie Spector, founding member, Brass Liberation Orchestra; Sarah Norr, musician, Brass Liberation Orchestra; Ofir Uziel, musician, Brass Liberation Orchestra.

Contributing Producers: Sarah Danson and Jill Friedberg
Producer/Online Editor: Pauline Bartolone
Producer: Andrew Stelzer
Executive Director: Lisa Rudman
Associate Director: Khanh Pham
Volunteer Coordinator: Karl Jagbandhansingh
Station Relations: Daphne Young
Web Editor: Jeff Giaquinto
Production Interns: Organizational Volunteers: Dan Turner, Ron Rucker, Alton Byrd & Alfonso Hooker


Segments (9:00-23:59)

Six Decades Of 20th Century America

From Charlie Warren | 12:38

An emotional fast-moving sound retrospective of American life packed into 12 minutes.

Comstock-gettyimages78485501square_small This is historical reality and nostalgia in a politically neutral package to complement coverage for events such as federal holidays or elections. From FDR's powerful Declaration of War to General Colin Powell's inspiring words after Desert Storm; Ingrid Bergman's request to "play it again, Sam;" Tom Hanks' orders to find Pvt. Ryan; the testy McCarthy Hearings; Archie Bunker's reaction to anti-war protestors; Carter's Iran hostage rescue attempt; Reagan's threat to tax increasers; Clinton's inauguration, apologies; and tons more.

I offer you "Six Decades Of 20th Century America" in 3 different forms:

1. A FULLY PRE-RECORDED version with an intro that encourages listeners to CHECK YOUR WEBSITE for a full "Cast List" of the voices and events they hear in the program. Also a pre-recorded close with accompanying written tag so you can give your website address. Under "Transcript" is a full "CAST LIST" of the voices and sounds in the program. I suggest placing this on your website and mentioning it in the open and close of the program to encourage traffic to your site.

2. A version with NO PRE-RECORDED INTRO OR CLOSE, with the opening music bed supplied. This is so you can have your own announcer(s) open and close the feature. See the "For Stations" tab for the script.

3. A FULLY PRE-RECORDED version with a shorter intro that has NO WEBSITE MENTION. This version can be aired as is, without live or additional recorded tags.

Another historically oriented special, "America: Our Country, Our Music," a one hour presentation specifically for Independence Day, can be found here: http://www.prx.org/pieces/26582.


Drop-Ins (2:00-4:59)

Summer Feature: Playing with Fire: Behind the Music and Fireworks at the Hollywood Bowl

From Anny Celsi | 05:00

In communities all over America, the 4th of July means outdoor concerts – and fireworks. Can you hear the “1812 Overture” without picturing brightly colored starbursts against a summer sky? And setting off fireworks to live music – that’s a performance in itself! Go behind the scenes with the pyro-musical team that lights up the Hollywood Bowl.

Hwood_bowl_02_small

Some people come for the music; some for the picnic. But for many Angelenos, summer at the Hollywood Bowl is all about the fireworks. Can you hear the “1812 Overture” without picturing brightly colored starbursts against a summer sky? And setting off fireworks to live music is a performance in itself. 

Eric Elias designs and directs the yearly fireworks spectaculars that accompany the L.A. Philharmonic at the Hollywood Bowl. With lively brown eyes behind round glasses, white hair and beard, and a calm, ever-present smile, he reminds you of your favorite college professor.   Hard to believe he spends his summers firing off rockets! And contrary to what people assume, he tells me, the job is not done by computers.  With a live orchestra onstage, the display must be timed and fired by human beings.  “What we do at the Hollywood Bowl is truly fireworks to music. And it's to live music,” says Elias – which can sometimes be tricky. “No matter what they tell you, if the conductor has one cup of coffee for rehearsal and two cups of coffee before the show - they play faster!”

Just as a percussion player would hit the castanets, Elias pushes a red button on his console that launches the fireworks placed above the bowl.  You could say he’s almost part of the orchestra – he’s definitely part of the performance.  But without knowing how to play or read music, how does Elias stay on the beat?

Sarah Hiner is his score reader.  A classically trained bassoonist, she both reads the score and watches the conductor in order to give Elias his cues. If the conductor varies the time, skips or repeats a passage, it’s her job to keep the show going in time with the music.

“I can follow the conductor,” says Hiner. But outside collaboration concerts are another story. “When rock and roll bands come in, and somebody decides to take an extra solo, or forgets a line, or completely changes what they're doing mid-stream - then we have to get a little creative!”

“And the one thing that we never want to see in the score,” adds Elias, “are the words ‘vamp’ and ‘solo.’ Because oftentimes we have no idea how long that's going to take, or where it's going to go!”

Hiner says it’s definitely one of the more interesting jobs she’s had as a musician.

I've performed in concerts, I've managed venues, I've worked with artists,” says Hiner, “and it's the one job I've done that still excites my dad to this day – the fact that I work with the fireworks crew at the Hollywood Bowl.”

I sat with Elias and Hiner as they rehearsed the score for Aaron Copland’s Hoe-Down for an upcoming program.  While Hiner marked the score, Elias worked out the cues to go with the fireworks display he has designed entirely in his head.  

“I want one there – one there – and one there,” he decides, noting the beats he wants to emphasize with a bang.  “But do I want two or three there? I think musically it makes sense to only have two?”

 

“You could put it on the bass drum,” Hiner suggests. “And the conductor might take a pause here – most conductors do.”

There’s no rehearsing the fireworks – they can be deployed once, and only once.  So on performance day, along with the audience, they’ll see their work for the first – and only – time.

 

Hoe-Down will be done once and probably never again,” says Elias.  “So our work literally goes up in smoke!”

4th of July Fireworks

From Hans Anderson | 03:27

A humorous, unique piece about setting off fireworks on the 4th.

July4_medium_medium_small Humorous piece about setting off fireworks on the 4th. It's good to know going in that this is about Fireworks. Probably should mention that in the intro if you use this piece. One piece is dry (no music bed) the other had some music. Take your pick.

A Taste of America: Fireworks

From Jake Warga | 04:56

A behind the scenes look at the American Fireworks team, and what it means to be an American, during the Macau International Fireworks Contest.

Warga4july05_small A behind the scenes look at the American Fireworks team, and what it means to be an American, during the Macau International Fireworks Contest. Aired July 4th, 2007, All Things Considered: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=11737366

Civil War Re-enactors

From Jake Warga | 04:50

A non-narrated portrait of a small group of Civil War buffs re-dedicating a Union veteran's grave in Oregon and reflecting on when our nation, as we understand it, was created. "We have the best country in the world, bar none."

Civilwarpic_small Good for any patriotic holiday: Veteran's, Memorial, 4th of July, Christmas...

Two lengths/Versions
4:49 (featuring more voices)
2:02 (fewer)

Orig. Aired Memorial Day 5/25/2009 "All Things Considered" (2min Version)
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=104521881

Celebrating the Fourth with the Enemy

From Dick Meister | 03:14

A first-person narrative about spending the Fourth of July in that Canadian territory settled by pro-British "Loyalists" who fled the U.S. after the Revolutionary War.

Default-piece-image-0 Ever wondered what the Fourth of July is like on the other side, in that part of Canada that was settled by pro-British "Loyalists" who fled the U.S. after the Revolutionary War? My wife and I found out, in Fredericton, the capitral of New Brunswick. British flags flew everywhere, portraits of Queen Elizabeth were everywhere. Much attention and praise was given crazy King George and others on the Brit side of the Revolution, including Benedict Arnold and other prominent "Loyalists." Even worse were some winged, stinging friends of the "Loyalists" who rudely interrupted our attempts to properly celebrate the Fourth.

Jefferson & Science

From William S. Hammack | 02:46

An engineer sees science in the Declaration of Independence.

Default-piece-image-1 Every Fourth of July I read the Declaration of Independence. Over the years I've detected, with my engineers eye, an unmistakable trace of science and math in the Declaration. Phrases like "laws of nature" had deep meaning for the Founders. Thomas Jefferson, John Adams and Benjamin Franklin, all members of the committee that wrote the Declaration, used science as a source for metaphors. They believed it to be the supreme expression of human reason. For no Founder was science more important than Jefferson, the Declaration's main author. What does this mean for us today?

Virginia: Colony to Commonwealth (Series)

Produced by Steve Clark

Historical insights about life in 17th and 18th century Colonial America, in light of events in Virginia that carried it from colony to commonwealth.

Most recent piece in this series:

Artillery in the Revolution

From Steve Clark | Part of the Virginia: Colony to Commonwealth series | 03:17

Yvc-cannon-firing_at_encampment_small

In the eighteenth century there were three basic types of artillery: cannon, mortars and howitzers. Historian Edward Ayres discusses the differences and the various uses of the types of guns. Ayres also talks about the sources for colonial artillery and how it shaped the outcome of various engagements in the American Revolution.

This I Believe - Andrew Sullivan

From This I Believe | 03:16

Although born in England, Andrew Sullivan finds his beliefs in America's Declaration of Independence.

Tiblogobluesmallrgb_small HOST INTRO: Andrew Sullivan was born in England and has an immigrant's love for the ideals of America. He draws his convictions straight from the Declaration of Independence -- His anthem is to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. Here is political commentator and blogger Andrew Sullivan with his essay for This I Believe. ESSAY TEXT: I believe in life. I believe in treasuring it as a mystery that will never be fully understood, as a sanctity that should never be destroyed, as an invitation to experience now what can only be remembered tomorrow. I believe in its indivisibility, in the intimate connection between the newest bud of spring and the flicker in the eye of a patient near death, between the athlete in his prime and the quadriplegic vet, between the fetus in the womb and the mother who bears another life in her own body. I believe in liberty. I believe that within every soul lies the capacity to reach for its own good, that within every physical body there endures an unalienable right to be free from coercion. I believe in a system of government that places that liberty at the center of its concerns, that enforces the law solely to protect that freedom, that sides with the individual against the claims of family and tribe and church and nation, that sees innocence before guilt and dignity before stigma. I believe in the right to own property, to maintain it against the benign suffocation of a government that would tax more and more of it away. I believe in freedom of speech and of contract, the right to offend and blaspheme, as well as the right to convert and bear witness. I believe that these freedoms are connected - the freedom of the fundamentalist and the atheist, the female and the male, the black and the Asian, the gay and the straight. I believe in the pursuit of happiness. Not its attainment, nor its final definition, but its pursuit. I believe in the journey, not the arrival; in conversation, not monologues; in multiple questions rather than any single answer. I believe in the struggle to remake ourselves and challenge each other in the spirit of eternal forgiveness, in the awareness that none of us knows for sure what happiness truly is, but each of us knows the imperative to keep searching. I believe in the possibility of surprising joy, of serenity through pain, of homecoming through exile. And I believe in a country that enshrines each of these three things, a country that promises nothing but the promise of being more fully human, and never guarantees its success. In that constant failure to arrive - implied at the very beginning - lies the possibility of a permanently fresh start, an old newness, a way of revitalizing our selves and our civilization in ways few foresaw and one day many will forget. But the point is now. And the place is America.


Interstitials (Under 2:00)

How to Sing the Star-Spangled Banner

From Jackson Braider | 01:32

Jenny Hersch, musical maven and part-owner of a baseball team, reveals the secrets of singing our anthem. From Jackson Braider.

Default-piece-image-0 The Star-Spangled Banner is a difficult song to sing. Set to a tune created by bunch of drunken English louts, our national anthem is filled with sordid little singing tricks that would challenge the most sober of souls. Fortunately, Jenny Hersch, folk bassist and once a part owner of a Pittsfield baseball team, saw through the Royalist plot and has come up with this foolproof guide for how to sing The Star-Spangled Banner right and in tune every time.