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Playlist: Rainbow Radio

Compiled By: PRX Editors

 Credit: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/people/woodwood/">Edward Kimber</a>
Image by: Edward Kimber 
Curated Playlist

June is LGBT Pride Month.

Below are picks chosen by PRX editorial staff. You can see all potential Pride Month pieces by browsing our gay and lesbian topic or by using our search.

Hour+ (Over 1:00:01)

8

From L.A. Theatre Works | Part of the L.A. Theatre Works series | 01:57:56

Brad Pitt, George Clooney, Martin Sheen, and Kevin Bacon lead an all-star cast in a timely portrait of an American civil-rights struggle.

Playing
8
From
L.A. Theatre Works

8_art_small

In November of 2008, California voters enacted Proposition 8, a ballot proposition and constitutional amendment which proposed that "only marriage between a man and a woman is valid or recognized in California." The validity of Prop 8 was subsequently upheld by the California Supreme Court, but a new organization called the American Foundation for Equal Rights challenged the ruling in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California.
 
On January 11, 2010, the trial of Perry v. Schwarzenegger opened under Judge Vaughn R. Walker, with high-profile trial lawyers – and former rivals – David Boies and Ted Olson joining forces in an unprecedented show of support for marriage equality. Dustin Lance Black's play 8 faithfully recreates the progression of the trial through original court transcripts and interviews conducted with the plaintiffs, as their story is brought to life before a live audience.
 
8 by Dustin Lance Black was produced for the stage by the American Foundation for Equal Rights and Broadway Impact. Directed by Rob Reiner. The all-star cast also includes Jamie Lee Curtis, Christine Lahti, John C. Reilly, Jane Lynch, Jesse Tyler Ferguson and more.
 
The broadcast includes three special features: a backstage conversation with George Clooney, Martin Sheen, John C. Reilly, and other stars of the production; an interview with Rob Reiner and Dustin Lance Black; and a conversation with attorneys David Boies and Ted Olson.  

"...everyone, regardless of political leaning, should hear this stunning production." - Audiofile Magazine review here

Supreme Court Oral Arguments from March 26, 2013

From Public Radio Exchange | 01:19:59

Raw, free audio from the Supreme Court case Hollingsworth v. Perry.

Gayrightslrg_small Original audio files and a PDF transcript can be found here on the Supreme Court's website.

Next Fall

From L.A. Theatre Works | Part of the L.A. Theatre Works series | 01:58:00

A same-sex couple wrestles with all the time-honored quarrels of a traditional partnership - and more.

Colorlogo_medium_small Just as the country has grappled with civic issues such as same-sex marriage and gays in the military, a similar struggle for acceptance has emerged in churches, synagogues, mosques, and other houses of worship. In our story this week, Adam and Luke are a long-term couple who have very different ideas about faith, God, and salvation. But a tragic accident forces their community of family and friends to put their most deeply-held beliefs to the test.

Next Fall by Geoffrey Nauffts, featuring members of the original Broadway cast. Starring Patrick Breen and Patrick Heusinger. The broadcast includes a conversation with Dr. Sharon Groves of the Human Rights Campaign on coming out as a person of faith.


Hour (49:00-1:00:00)

Committed: Marriage in America [Rebroadcast]

From BackStory with the American History Guys | Part of the BackStory with the American History Guys: Full Episodes series | 54:00

Later this month, the Supreme Court will hear challenges to two major laws on marriage -- California's Proposition 8 and the federal Defense of Marriage Act. Both define marriage as between a man and a woman, and both have sparked heated arguments over what marriage should mean in America today.

And of course, those arguments have a history. So in this hour of BackStory, we look at how past generations of Americans have defined and redefined marriage.

Marriage How have the rules we make about marriage changed the shapes of our families and influenced our society?  We explore the 20th century origins of marriage counseling (and its dark side) as well as a panic over child brides that swept across the country in the late 1930s.  We'll also take a look at how the experience of marriage changed for enslaved people after Emancipation.  And, we visit a modern-day wedding in Elkton, MD -- the former get-hitched-quick capital of America.

Guests Include:

  • Wendy Kline, University of Cincinnati, on the dawn of marriage counseling
  • Liz Regosin, St. Lawrence University, on federal regulation of freedpeople's marriages
  • Nicholas Syrett, University of Northern Colorado, on the 1930s panic over child marriage
 

Gay in the Eyes of God: An Hour-Long Special

From Interfaith Voices | Part of the Gay in the Eyes of God: A 21-Part Series series | 59:00

Weaving personal stories with interpretations of scripture, we explore how America’s major faith traditions deal with acceptance of LGBT people.

Rainbowflagedit_creative_commons_ludovic_bertron_small Open any Torah, Bible or Koran, and the passages about homosexuality seem clear: being gay is an abomination; a sin; something that incurs the wrath of God. But for some, these interpretations are changing.

"Gay in the Eyes of God" is a special production of Interfaith Voices, the leading religion news magazine on public radio. It explores the ways in which the major American religious traditions (Christianity, Judaism and Islam) grapple with acceptance of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people.

We present personal stories as well as interpretations of scripture and theology - both traditional and progressive. The series features stories from:

•       Celestine and Hilary - a Catholic couple where one partner is transgender
•       A Catholic lesbian who decides the only way to be faithful is to be celibate
•       Gay and lesbian Orthodox Jews in Brooklyn
•       An Orthodox rabbi who defends tradition
•       An openly gay imam who leads a welcoming service in a Washington, DC mosque
•       An African-American Christian woman who struggles with her father over being a lesbian

"Gay in the Eyes of God" comes an important time, as the Supreme Court takes up the Defense of Marriage Act and Proposition 8, and the nation becomes more accepting of LGBT people. Still, the country is divided, and our series reflects many different views on this issue.

This special features some of the best interviews from our 21-part series on this topic .

Made with the support of the Arcus Foundation.

Polk Street Stories

From Atlantic Public Media | Part of the The Transom Radio Specials series | 54:00

An oral history of the Polk Street neighborhood in San Francisco, as told by those who have called it home.

River_small Public Historian Joey Plaster spent over a year gathering more than 70 interviews from people experiencing Polk Street's transition from a working class queer neighborhood to an upscale entertainment district.  This hour contains stories from the alleys and bars, churches, shelters and clubs.  It is an oral history of a place invented by those who had no other home.  


As Joey says in his introduction:

"The Polk Street scene predates the modern gay rights movement. In some ways, it was a visible manifestation of the stereotypes the movement has worked to scrub clean over the past forty years: queer people as mentally ill, criminal, licentious, and doomed to lonely lives. Instead of repudiating this history, I wanted to embrace and learn from it.

"I came to San Francisco in part to figure out what it means to be queer – I came to what my uncle called the land of fruit and nuts. If the famous gay Castro neighborhood was scrubbed clean and glossy, I was always more attracted to its black sheep sister, the queer world of Polk Street. It was a whole world to itself, just about ten blocks of low rent hotels, bars and liquor stores, all sandwiched in between the gritty Tenderloin, City Hall, and the upscale Nob Hill. But by the time I got there, that scene was receding, and luxury condos and posh clubs were taking its place. People said gentrification was displacing the down and out folks who had long made Polk Street their home. Young queer activist groups held protests. Drag queens led take back the Polk marches. The press chimed in – some called it a death, some a renaissance.

"For me, it felt like an enormous loss. Like I was losing part of the history I’d come to San Francisco to claim, to become part of. I knew the Polk Street scene predated the Castro and the Stonewall riots, that it reached back to the origins of the early gay movement. But I found that its marginal history wasn’t written down and hadn’t been recorded. I feared it too would disappear with the neighborhood. In a way, I started to think about Polk Street as this parent I never knew, now elderly and dying. And it became an obsession to save its history – its collective wisdom and secrets -- before they were gone completely.

"Some of the stories were painful to hear. They’re from people who are often out of sight and forgotten. In this hour, you won’t hear a full history of the neighborhood, you’ll hear stories from the extremes, about the rewards and perils of the freedom Polk Street offered."

This Transom Radio Special is produced by Joey Plaster with Jay Allison and Transom.org at Atlantic Public Media in Woods Hole, Massachusetts.

Gay Pride and Prejudice

From Philosophy Talk | 54:00

Why is the gay rights movement so threatening to some that it leads to moral panic?

Kenjohn_small The question of gay rights has become a hot button issue, with opposition taking on the air of a moral panic and support taking on the air of a righteous crusade. John and Ken attempt to dispassionately examine the competing scientific, religious, and philosophical visions of the nature of gayness. They explore the consequences of those competing arguments for and against gay rights with cultural and psychological anthropologist Gilbert Herdt, editor of Moral Panics, Sex Panics: Fear and the Fight over Sexual Rights.

States of Marriage

From Vermont Public Radio | 52:00

Hour-long newscast compatible program examines the last decade of significant change in marriage rights for same-sex couples. This news documentary covers the politics legalities and advocacy efforts in various states, with particular attention to Vermont, Massachusetts, California, Iowa and Maine.

States-of-marriage-300x300_small Same-sex marriage is one of the more controversial issues of our time. States Of Marriage: The Debate Over Gay Rights provides meaning and context not only to Vermont's history with this issue, but tells the national story as well.

Ten years ago in December, the Vermont Supreme Court changed the landscape of legal rights for same-sex couples when it handed down its ruling in the case Baker v. State of Vermont. The three same-sex couples who were the Baker plaintiffs had argued that they deserve the rights of marriage, just as heterosexual couples do. 

In the decade since, the country has debated the deeply personal and very public questions of what marriage means and how to legally recognize gay and lesbian couples, and how ideas of family and civil rights are challenged by these questions. 

States of Marriage examines how several states have approached legal recognition for gay and lesbian couples. We examine the divisive civil unions precedent in Vermont and how it set the stage for a marriage law in Massachusetts. Advocates on both sides of the issue explain their political and legal strategies to convince voters and courts of their cause, and we see the results of that debate in California, Iowa and Maine.


Out Loud

From Playing on Air | 53:00

Three short plays. There You Are is about two women who meet at an outdoor concert and pursue the relationship they didn't dare to in their youth. In Small Things, a door-to-door evangelist on his last day of service is invited in for the first time by an older man. In If We're Using A Surrogate How Come I'm The One With Morning Sickness a gay parent comically rants about having a child. Interviews are with Leslie Ayvazian, Cary Pepper and James Lecesne.

Playing
Out Loud
From
Playing on Air

Olympia_dukakis_photo_small Three short plays. There You Are, with Olympia Dukakis and Maria Tucci, is about two women who meet again at an outdoor concert and pursue the relationship they didn't dare to in their youth. Then in Small Things by Cary Pepper a young door-to-door evangelist (Bobby Steggert) on his last day of service is invited in for the first time by an older man (Jack Wetherall).  In the third short, If We're Using A Surrogate How Come I'm The One With The Morning Sickness, by Marco Pennette; a gay parent (James Lecesne) comically rants about having a child. Interviews are with Leslie Ayvazian, Cary Pepper and James Lecesne. There You Are by Leslie Ayvazian with Olympia Dukakis (Oscar) and Maria Tucci. Small Things by Cary Pepper with Bobby Steggert and Jack Wetherall. If We're Using A Surrogate How Come I'm The One With The Morning Sickness by Marco Pennette with James Lecesne (Oscar). 

Outright Radio Series 2004 (Series)

Produced by Outright Radio

Fascinating, entertaining and intriguing radio featuring the lives and stories of America's gay community. From Outright Radio.

Most recent piece in this series:

AIDS These Days

From Outright Radio | Part of the Outright Radio Series 2004 series | 59:00

Aidsskyatmaitriicon_small AIDS These Days ? a comprehensive look in 2004 at HIV/AIDS in the gay community including how the new treatments are seen as maintenance drugs and has fostered a rise in new infection rates. We also hear about some of the side effects of the anti-virals and examine the issues of crystal use as a co-factor in sero-conversion. We also examine unsafe sexual practices, and the changing prevention messages.

Pride outLoud

From outLoud Radio | 59:00

From Sex Ed to vampires, stories on LGBT topics from youth producers.

Imgp0207_small The youth producers of outLoud Radio bring you an hour of stories about lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and otherwise non-straight life.


Half-Hour+ (30:01-48:59)

David Blankenhorn And The Battle Over Same-Sex Marriage

From WNPR | 44:26

In this piece, you’ll hear an exclusive interview in which America’s most famous opponent of same-sex marriage announces that he has changed his mind, and he now supports marriage rights for gay and lesbian couples.

Chion_wolf_small In the next hour, you’ll hear an exclusive interview in which America’s most famous opponent of same-sex marriage announces that he has changed his mind, and he now supports marriage rights for gay and lesbian couples.


Half-Hour (24:00-30:00)

Boy Scouts partially lift gay ban

From Media For the Public Good, Inc. | Part of the OutCasting series | 29:00

On May 23, the Boy Scouts of America voted to lift its ban on gay youth members. The ban on gay adult leaders still stands. This program looks at the history of the ban and the forces that led its partial lifting.

Wdfh-oc_small

Since the late 1970s, the Boy Scouts of America (B.S.A.) has had a policy that bans gay youth and adult leaders from membership in the Boy Scouts.  In 2000, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that B.S.A. had the legal right to continue this discriminatory policy.  In the years since, organizations have been formed to fight the ban through other channels. 

 

Meanwhile, B.S.A. has ejected Scouts and adult leaders whose homosexuality came its attention.  Others, after becoming aware of the policy, left Scouting on their own.  Untold numbers have declined to get involved at all.

 

More than 60% of volunteer Scouting leaders voted on Thursday, May 23, to partially lift the ban, but only to the extent that it covers youth Scouting members; under the proposed change, gay adult leaders will still be banned.

 

Will it now be safe for gay Scouts to come out?  What message does the partial change send?  Will it be enough to enable B.S.A. to regain some of the support and membership it has lost?  Perhaps most importantly, why is the B.S.A. reluctant to make a sweeping statement that discrimination is simply wrong?

 

This edition of OutCasting explores these complex issues through discussions with people who are or have been involved with the fight to overturn the ban, including:

  • Evan Wolfson, the civil rights attorney who represented a gay Scout whose ejection from Scouting led to the U.S. Supreme Court case Boy Scouts v. James Dale ;

  • Zach Wahls, the executive director of Scouts for Equality ;

  • Mark Noel, the executive director of the Inclusive Scouting Network who was ejected under the gay ban shortly after the Supreme Court decided the James Dale case;

  • Michelle Tompkins, national media manager of the Girl Scouts of the United States;

  • Christoph, who left Scouting;

  • David, a current Scout who opposes the ban; and

  • Michael, who is still closeted in Scouting.

Liberace & His Spectacular Crystal Closet

From Out in the Bay - Gay Radio from San Francisco | 29:42

A half-hour music-rich documentary on Liberace and the former Liberace Museum. His story is told using historical clips from Liberace himself in performance, and interviews/ tours with museum curators and Liberace's only approved tribute artist.

L_pink_feather_cape_247x264_small Th e hoopla over "Behind the Candelabra," HBO's Liberace movie , give us reason to re-air a sound-rich half-hour  documentary on the late "Mr. Showmanship"’s fabulous life and legacy, produced by Out in the Bay's Eric Jansen and told with love by Liberace Museum curators , a Liberace impersonator, and featuring Liberace’s own voice and music . So sit back ( preferably in marble tub with champagne in hand!), close your eyes and enjoy a trip back in time with the most spectacular, fabulous, outlandish, and ground-breaking closeted entertainer of the 20th century.
(Intro and outro tracks may be tailored; stations please contact producer to arrange.)

Music rights note:

All music in this piece is Liberace in concert with the London Philharmonic in 1982. C opyright owned and permission granted to use in this piece, for worldwide broadcast, by the Liberace Foundation.

Finding Miles

From Sarah P. Reynolds | 27:11

Miles was born in the wrong body. He was born Megan and after 15 years of serious depression and confusion about his place in the world, at age 28, he decided to do something about it. He chose the name Miles and began his slow and difficult transition into manhood. He brought an audio recorder with him. This is his story.

1984-4-13_megan_swing_small Miles was born in the wrong body.   He was born Megan and after 15 years of serious depression and confusion about his place in the world, at age 28, he decided to do something about it.  He chose the name Miles and began his slow and difficult transition into manhood.  He brought an audio recorder with him.  This is his story.

Featured on Transom.org.  For more information and conversation, visit "Finding Miles" on Transom.org.

Surviving Ex-Gay Therapy

From Making Contact | Part of the Making Contact series | 29:00

The growth of the ex-gay movement in the last two decades gave rise to hundreds of therapy programs aiming to change people’s sexual orientation. But there’s another growing movement, led by survivors of ex-gay therapy, to disprove and ban ex-gay therapy.

Z_headphones-globe_small The growth of the ex-gay movement in the last two decades gave rise to hundreds of therapy programs aiming to change people’s sexual orientation. Many were explicitly religious, and claimed to be able to “pray away the gay”. But there’s a growing movement, led by survivors of ex-gay therapy, to disprove and ban these harmful practices for good. On this edition, stories of recovery from conversion therapy, and becoming ex- ex-gay.

Special Thanks to Robert Frazier of Monitor Studios and Terry Gildea of KUER.

Destination DIY: Gender Expression

From Destination DIY | 28:07

Can gender expression be a do-it-yourself project? We'll attempt to answer that and many other complex questions about sexuality, biology and identity in four interviews with people across the gender spectrum. From Julie Sabatier.

Destdiy2c2_small Can gender expression be a do-it-yourself project? We'll attempt to answer that and many other complex questions about sexuality, biology and identity in four interviews with people across the gender spectrum. Diane Anderson-Minshall, executive editor of Curve Magazine, who identifies her gender as "femme," will discuss how her partner, Jake's transition from female to male has made her think differently about the innate nature of gender. Kodey Park Bambino, who identifies as "genderqueer" will discuss life outside the gender binary. We'll also hear from Ace Furnish, a young man who began his transition from female to male at age 15.

Steve Moore: Tears of a Clown

From Charles McGuigan | Part of the A Grain of Sand series | 28:41

AIDS survivor Steve Moore was one of the first comedians in the international limelight to bring laughter to this devastating illness.

Stevemoore_104ma24735665-0001_small Steve was born in Danville, Virginia to Skeets and Wilma, both factory workers. Steve was gay in a community that had trouble accepting his orientation. Again and again he was surprised by the love of his parents and brother Dale. Skeets and Wilma even began to challenge their own Southern Baptsit beliefs. Steve studied theatre, pursued acting in New York then headed out to L.A. where he became a comedian. Just as his career was blossoming, Steve was diagnosed with HIV. His world came to a stand still and he moved back to Virginia where he rented a travel trailer on a mountain lake. He hatched out a plan that would propel into the international limelight.


Segments (9:00-23:59)

Gay Voice

From The Organist | 12:26

Thomas Rogers on the origins of the gay male voice.

Playing
Gay Voice
From
The Organist

Artworks-000055374924-kmy36t-crop_small Thomas Rogers on the origins of the gay male voice. Produced by Jenna Weiss-Berman.

There were ghosts everywhere: AIDS in Provincetown

From Sarah Yahm | 12:13

Provincetown is both a gay vacation mecca and a small fishing village on the tip of Cape Cod. This piece examines the way AIDS affected this unique small town in the '80s and '90s.

Provincetowneastend_small From Memorial Day to Labor Day Provincetown Massachusetts is one of the world's largest and most well known gay vacation meccas.  This small fishing village is festooned with pride flags, drag queens, and gay couples of all ages holding hands and ice cream cones.  But in the late 80's and 90's, while the party continued, 10 percent of Provincetown's year round population was dying of AIDS. And most of the remaining 90 percent were tending to them. This piece is about what it was like to live and die in this small town in the midst of this epidemic and the surreal mix of celebration and devastation.  

The Boundaries of Love in the Holy Land

From Bending Borders | Part of the Love is Complicated series | 12:18

It is rare for an Israeli and a Palestinian to fall in love. There are physical barriers, as Israelis can’t enter Palestinian areas, and Palestinians can’t enter Israeli areas, without special permits. There are also cultural barriers, of course. But a year ago, two 29-year-old men - one from Jerusalem, the other from a West Bank village - met one another and demonstrated that sometimes love can be found. Reporter Daniel Estrin brings us their story.

Boundariesoflove_small This production is part of the Global Story Project, with support from the Open Society Foundations. Presented by PRX, the Public Radio Exchange.

Bon Voyage

From Julia Scott | 23:00

Paul Perkovic and his husband, Eric Trefelner, have lived in style for 36 years. When they find out that Paul has inoperable pancreatic cancer, they decide he should go out in style, too. Bon Voyage brings the listener along on the intimate, emotional journey of a same-sex couple coping with mortality.

Playing
Bon Voyage
From
Julia Scott

Paul_perkovic__l__and_eric_trefelner_small
RAVE REVIEW: The Guardian calls BON VOYAGE "Vivid and beautifully told
... A tremendous listen: you felt as if you knew both subjects within moments, and got an insight into the hardest moments a relationship will face."


Paul Perkovic and his husband, Eric Trefelner, have lived in style for 36 years. When they find out that Paul has inoperable pancreatic cancer, they decide he should go out in style, too. Eric plans a lavish, quarter million-dollar "Bon Voyage" party at a fine arts museum in San Francisco. Paul and Eric aren't just planning a party; they're trying to choreograph a death. But when relationship breakdowns developm that neither man expects, the couple discovers that death has its own agenda. BON VOYAGE brings the listener along on the intimate, emotional journey of a same-sex couple coping with mortality.

STORY UPDATE : Paul Perkovic died November 26, 2012, in Eric Trefelner's arms at their home in Montara, Calif.

PRODUCER Julia Scott is an award-winning radio producer, journalist and essayist based in San Francisco. She produces documentaries and news features for several nationally syndicated programs. Her previous work is archived at www.juliascott.net .

EXECUTIVE PRODUCER Anne Donohue is Associate Professor of Journalism at Boston University. She was the special projects editor at Monitor Radio for five years, and has also been a contributor to NPR, the BBC, WGBH, WBUR and other public radio programs.

BON VOYAGE is part of Real America, a series from the BBC World Service that enlisted four American producers to tell stories found only in America.

Gay in the Eyes of God: A 21-Part Series (Series)

Produced by Interfaith Voices

(Includes pieces of various lengths. See also the hour-long special above.) Open any Torah, Bible or Koran, and the passages about homosexuality seem clear: being gay is an abomination; a sin; something that incurs the wrath of God. But for many, these interpretations are changing.

"Gay in the Eyes of God" is a special production of Interfaith Voices, the leading religion news magazine on public radio. It explores the ways in which the major American religious traditions (Christianity, Judaism and Islam) grapple with acceptance of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people.

Most recent piece in this series:

Gay in the Eyes of God: An Hour-Long Special

From Interfaith Voices | Part of the Gay in the Eyes of God: A 21-Part Series series | 59:00

Rainbowflagedit_creative_commons_ludovic_bertron_small Open any Torah, Bible or Koran, and the passages about homosexuality seem clear: being gay is an abomination; a sin; something that incurs the wrath of God. But for some, these interpretations are changing.

"Gay in the Eyes of God" is a special production of Interfaith Voices, the leading religion news magazine on public radio. It explores the ways in which the major American religious traditions (Christianity, Judaism and Islam) grapple with acceptance of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people.

We present personal stories as well as interpretations of scripture and theology - both traditional and progressive. The series features stories from:

•       Celestine and Hilary - a Catholic couple where one partner is transgender
•       A Catholic lesbian who decides the only way to be faithful is to be celibate
•       Gay and lesbian Orthodox Jews in Brooklyn
•       An Orthodox rabbi who defends tradition
•       An openly gay imam who leads a welcoming service in a Washington, DC mosque
•       An African-American Christian woman who struggles with her father over being a lesbian

"Gay in the Eyes of God" comes an important time, as the Supreme Court takes up the Defense of Marriage Act and Proposition 8, and the nation becomes more accepting of LGBT people. Still, the country is divided, and our series reflects many different views on this issue.

This special features some of the best interviews from our 21-part series on this topic .

Made with the support of the Arcus Foundation.

Voices: A Palestinian Lesbian's Story

From Radio Netherlands Worldwide | Part of the RN Focus on Torn Lives - Stories from the Holy Land series | 11:58

The story of Cindy, a Palestinian lesbian living in Israel.

2004092804_small Cindy is a 26-year-old Palestinian who lives in Israel. She and a dozen other Moslem women have set up a lesbian group, called Aswat or Voices. Its goal is to provide support to Palestinian and Arab-Israeli lesbians and to try to overcome some of the taboos regarding homosexuality. For more information, contact joan@schardtmedia.org

Standing Up To 377

From Abbie Fentress Swanson | 09:40

A documentary examining the politics of homosexuality in India.

Standing_up_to_377_small Some 50 million gay men and women living in India were technically illegal up until June 2009. That's when Section 377 of India's Penal Code, a British colonial law which had barred "unnatural" sex, was overturned. This documentary looks at the movement of gay Indian activists that helped change the law and the winning petition they filed with Delhi's High Court that moved the government to change Section 377.

Characters and scenes in the documentary include Section 377 activist Gautam Bhan; two counselors working at a lesbian helpline in Delhi; a Chennai sex worker who talks about how he was forced to marry his niece despite being gay; and a drag show at a men's health center in Mumbai that shows the increased visibility of the gay rights movement. The documentary also includes an interview from a conservative member of Parliament in India who says homosexuality doesn't exist.

Gay and Lesbian Muslims, On a "Jihad" For Love

From Interfaith Voices | 12:00

An interview with Parvez Sharma, director of "A Jihad For Love," and Muhsin Hendricks, a subject of the film. From Interfaith Voices.

Ajihadforlove_small Host Intro: A short passage in the Koran, along with a handful of quotes attributed to the prophet Muhammed, condemn homosexuality as a crime in the eyes of many Islamic scholars. Punishments range from whippings, prison time or even death by stoning. A new documentary called "A Jihad for Love" tells the stories of more than a dozen gay and lesbian Muslims from around the world...all of whom stay devoted to a faith that doesn't seem to want them. Laura Kwerel explains. Outro: "A Jihad For Love" is playing in select theaters now through September.

Amanda's Diary: Girlfriend

From Radio Diaries | Part of the Teenage Diaries series | 21:30

Amanda's family is Catholic. Amanda is bisexual. And she's having a hard time getting her parents to understand that this is not just a phase.

Td_amanda_001_l_small Amanda's family is Catholic. Amanda is bisexual. And she's having a hard time getting her parents to understand that this is not just a phase. "When I was in the first grade, I remember one day we were playing a game that was kind of like Sleeping Beauty where like the prettiest girl on the block fell asleep on a picnic bench. And you know, somebody had to go and wake her up, to like, kiss her and revive her and it would always be one of the boys. And I always felt like I wanted to go and revive her."

This story is part of the Teenage Diaries series  produced by Radio Diaries for NPR. Since 1996, Executive Producer Joe Richman has been giving tape recorders to young people around the country to document their lives. In December of 2012, Radio Diaries will revisit five of the original diarists 16 years after their first recordings. The series is broadcast on NPR's All Things Considered.

How Are You Who You Are?

From Eric Winick | 21:13

A unique story about the complexity of human character and the tenacity of love in the face of unpredictable health challenges and unexpected gender-bending.

62003_small In 1995, Douglas A. Nadeau of Marblehead, Massachusetts underwent a pallidotomy at Mass. General Hospital, an operation designed to eradicate neurons in his brain that no longer responded to dopamine, the naturally-created chemical that facilitates movement. Nine years earlier, while on a business trip, Doug had been bitten by an insect and developed strange Parkinsonian symptoms, such as the inability to keep his eyes open while talking. These caused numerous problems for Doug, a high-powered corporate lawyer in Boston. Over time, the symptoms worsened until Doug lost his mobility at night and was reduced to a hospital bed. Following the procedure, in which Doug practically walked off the operating table, he found he was unable to inhibit certain antisocial tendencies that, prior to the surgery, he'd kept repressed. To make matters worse, his surgery turned out to be a failure, and his symptoms returned one by one. The next nine years tested the boundaries and limits of love, marriage, and tolerance, both within the family and in the Nadeaus' wide circle of friends and acquaintances.


Cutaways (5:00-8:59)

Small Town Pride

From Jennifer Jerrett | 05:07

Red state, rural America isn't exactly the first place that pops into your mind when you think about pioneering LGTBQ pride movements.

8739513831_e847a858d0_n_small Moab, Utah, a little town in the southeast corner of the state, isn't the likeliest of places for a burgeoning LGBTQ pride movement. But the Moab Pride Festival, established in 2011, calls itself "...the nation's second largest small town Pride Festival." In these places, where everyone knows everyone, it can be hard to stand up for something you believe in -- something that makes you different -- but maybe it's exactly these hometowns that have the best shot at pioneering a community-driven atmosphere of tolerance and understanding.

Coming Out in The Age of Lady Gaga

From Radio Rookies | Part of the Radio Rookies: Coming Up in 2011 series | 05:05

Last year a couple of kids at my lunch table were talking smack about gay people. So I got angry and said “what if I’m gay?” I couldn’t believe I just said that out loud. But then everyone started saying, “eeew, why’s she gay?” So I took it back. - Bebe

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Bebe's story takes a look at what it means for teenagers to come out in 2011.  Never before has popular culture espoused more positive messages for gay teenagers—everything from the television show Glee’s several gay characters, to Lady Gaga’s call to her fans to celebrate all of who they are.  Radio Rookie Bebe reports that even though some kids at her middle school like to “play around gay”, actually coming out as gay or lesbian may not be as simple as Lady Gaga makes it sound.   

Fighting Homophobia in the Classroom

From Anny Celsi | 06:06

Teens in Los Angeles use live theater to battle homophobia in the classroom.

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The death of Laurence King – killed by a junior high classmate in Oxnard, California in 2008 – highlights a big problem: If you're a teacher, how should you deal with homophobia in the classroom? One group is using theater to teach teachers how to counteract sexual bias in Southern California classrooms.

The program is put on by Encompass, a non-profit group that focuses on diversity issues in California schools. The actors are students from the LA County High School for the arts.

According to the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network, by the time they get to high school, ninety percent of lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgendered students have experienced physical, verbal or sexual harassment at school. Those students are more likely to skip school out of fear, don’t do as well academically as their straight peers, and are less likely to graduate.

In the training, educators watch a scene where homophobic behavior disrupts a classroom and creates stress.  The observers are given insight into the students' inner lives and how they're affected by sexual bias. They're then asked to come up with techniques the teacher might use to make the classroom safer and more inclusive.  The scene is repeated, with the actors using improv to act out the new strategies.  With the teacher in control, things play out differently this time - the bullies dial back their behavior, the name-calling and hate-speech is squelched, and the students are free to focus on their lesson.

Student actor Drew Cameron says, “hopefully teachers are watching this and thinking, here’s some students that are putting on a scene for us. Here are some students who are showing us how to be better teachers. “

… better teachers in a school where every student feels safe to focus on the job of learning.

Trans-Identities: A Community Comes Out in Western New England (Series)

Produced by Tina Antolini

When you look at someone, a stranger at the library, on the street, what's the first thing you notice? Often, it's their gender. For some people, though, gender isn't so easily divided into one category or the other. This series profiles the personal stories of transgender residents of Western New England, and their civil rights efforts.

Most recent piece in this series:

Trans-Identites Part 3: Legislating Civil Rights

From Tina Antolini | Part of the Trans-Identities: A Community Comes Out in Western New England series | 06:35

Transpridemarchersinnorthamptonmajune2008_small More than one bill languished in Massachusetts last legislative session, including a bill that would have added "gender identity and gender expression" to the state's anti-discrimination and hate crimes laws. The bill is aimed at protecting people who identify with a gender other than the one on their birth certificate. The transgender community maintains that current laws regarding sexual orientation don't protect them. Legislation providing similar protections in Connecticut passed the senate, but didn't clear the house. In the final part of a series on the region's transgender community, Tina Antolini reports on the debate over these bills, and why advocates think they stalled in the legislature

James Roberts

From Rachel Falcone | Part of the Housing is a Human Right Storytelling Project Vol. 1 series | 08:10

James Roberts shares his journey trying to save his ailing partner William, who has HIV, and their home together. Full piece includes story with intro and outro.

James_williams-0530_small “I’m not his husband, I’m not his wife, I’m not his brother, I’m not his mother, who am I?…I’m everything to him.” James Roberts

James Roberts is forced to resign from a lucrative job on Wall Street to care for his ailing partner William, who has HIV. James talks about his struggle to save both William and their home together, as William’s health gets progressively worse.

In the full piece, the intro is a rythmic mix of different voices from the Housing is a Human Right Storytelling project. The outro is a description of the project with information about how to participate by Creator and Co-Producer Michael Premo.

“Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” repeal a victory for local servicewomen

From KALW | 06:43

For many, the battle to allow gay and lesbian soldiers to serve openly was the end of a long journey, and a momentous victory for civil rights.

Picture_1_small It’s been less than a year since “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” was repealed, and soon, gays and lesbians can come out – or go in – to the military without fear of losing their careers. For many, the battle to allow gay and lesbian soldiers to serve openly was the end of a long journey, and a momentous victory for civil rights. Reporter Priscilla Yuki Wilson has more.

It's An Accomplishment

From Salt Institute for Documentary Studies | 08:47

"Kyle," a FTM transgender 14-year-old, desperately wants to tell his classmates and peers that he was born a girl.

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Producer Jen Telischak has the story of a critical moment in the life of "Kyle," a FTM transgender 14-year-old who desperately wants to tell his classmates and peers that he was born a girl.  His mom, Susan, doesn't think this is a good idea and wants Kyle to wait until he's older.  A snapshot that encompasses a moment of change.

I'm Relatively Human

From Salt Institute for Documentary Studies | 07:47

Marty Hagglund had it all. He had a loving wife, a beautiful home, and a great job. Then, Marty threw it all to the wind to realize a deep-seated, life-long desire––become a woman. From Selena Simmons-Duffin of the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies.

Marty2_small Marty Hagglund had it all. He had a loving wife, a beautiful home, and a great job. Then, Marty threw it all to the wind to realize a deep-seated, life-long desire — to become a woman. Her story is not about transitioning between genders. It’s about what happens after you’ve arrived at your destination, and are forced to consider what you gained, and what you lost.

Remember the Upstairs Lounge

From Julia Botero | 06:09

One evening in the summer of 1973, an arsonist set the Upstairs Lounge on fire. The piece brings attention to a forgotten tragedy, an act of courage that helped to galvanize the gay community, and the work of an emerging artist dedicated to reinterpreting and retelling New Orleans gay history. From Julia Botero.

01_small Local artist Skylar Fein is fascinated by New Orlean's gay cultural history. For the art biennial Prospect One which closed this past month, Skylar paid homage to the memory of a gay bar in the French Quarter.

One evening in the summer of 1973, an arsonist set the Upstairs Lounge on fire. Most of the bar's regulars, including many friends and lovers, died that night. In an installation, Skylar recreated the inside of The Upstairs Lounge.

The piece brings attention to a forgotten tragedy, an act of courage that helped to galvanize the gay community, and the work of an emerging artist dedicated to reinterpreting and retelling New Orleans gay history.

Thanks For Sharing Your Girlfriend

From Salt Institute for Documentary Studies | 05:49

From Monica Lewinski to Mark Sanford, infidelity is always big news. But recently a debate about whether monogamy is the only model for long-term relationships has also been making headlines. CNN considered the question “Is monogamy realistic?” and Newsweek wondered if consensual non-monogamy might be the next sexual revolution.

Default-piece-image-1 A 52 year old dog trainer from South Portland, Maine is trying something different: polyamory, the practice of maintaining committed relationships with multiple partners.

Riot Boy

From outLoud Radio | 06:16

One boy's unlikely connection with the music of northwest feminists. A hero's journey of self-discovery (sifting through Riot Grrrl records in his mom's attic). Features killer tracks from Sleater-Kinney and Bikini Kill, and compelling interviews with original Riot Grrrls. From Diego Ruiz of outLoud Radio.

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Diegoyeebfacepic_small A hero's journey of self-discovery (sifting through Riot Grrrl records in his mom's attic). Features killer tracks from Sleater-Kinney and Bikini Kill, and compelling interviews with original Riot Grrrls.

Dia's Diary: My Mother

From outLoud Radio | 06:08

Many transgender people come out as gay first. Dia Fallana is a young transgender woman living in a poor part of Oakland, California. In this page from her audio diary, she tells the story of how her mother's anti-gay attitude kept her in the closet -- until she was forced to tell the truth. From outLoud Radio.

Default-piece-image-1 Many transgender people come out as gay first. Dia Fallana is a young transgender woman living in a poor part of Oakland, California. In this page from her audio diary, she tells the story of how her mother's anti-gay attitude kept her in the closet -- until she was forced to tell the truth.


Drop-Ins (2:00-4:59)

Hard Boiled Eggs

From Audio Smut | Part of the Tender Moments series | 04:30

A story of an unlikely pair brought together by gender and technology.

Audio_smut_square_logo_600x600-white_on_grey_small Beta is intersex. Which means she doesn't fit squarely into either gender, in a biological sense. Most intersex babies are assigned a gender at birth and undergo surgery. She didn't find out until her 20s, which caused great confusion for her growing up. Cary's story is almost exactly the same---born intersex, assigned a gender that didn't really fit, found out much later in life. Cary and Beta were living 1000 miles apart when they met on Second Life. After a life time of being a very different type of different, they each found someone with whom they could truly relate.

While Audio Smut's "Tender Moments" are in full compliance with FCC regulations, they do openly engage with the topic of sexuality and gender.

M4M

From Salt Institute for Documentary Studies | 05:57

With the legalization of same-sex marriage in Maine, Barton Girdwood got to wondering, what about all the gay men in Maine who never found love?

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With the legalization of same-sex marriage in Maine, Barton Girdwood got to wondering, what about all the gay men in Maine who never found love? What does this matter to them? And at 22, Barton drove up to Northport, Maine to meet Bob, who Barton hoped could answer a universal question: what happens if you don't find love? 

Best Couple

From Radio Rookies | 04:48

When seniors at a small public high school in the Bronx cast their votes for "Best Couple" they chose a pair they admire but who definitely defy the stereotype of best couple.

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Vikkydeoine_prom09_small When seniors at a small public high school in the Bronx cast their votes for "Best Couple" they chose a pair they admire but who definitely defy the stereotype of best couple.

A Transgender Childhood

From Third Coast International Audio Festival | Part of the 2008 Third Coast ShortDocs: Radio Ephemera series | 03:03

Growing up isn't easy - when you feel as if your mind is one gender, and your body another.

Shortdocs08_small Growing up isn't easy - when you feel as if your mind is one gender, and your body another.

A Transgender Childhood was produced by Tina Antolini for the 2008 Third Coast ShortDocs Challenge: Radio Ephemera, which invited anyone and everyone to produce short audio works inspired by five books carefully selected from the extensive and treasured collection of printed ephemera housed at the Prelinger Library in San Francisco, CA.

Changing Roles and Rules

From Amy Gastelum | 05:01

Stef Adkins competes in his very first Drag Competition as Barbie Que, juggling issues of identity and boundaries.

Default-piece-image-2 In his twenties, Stef Adkins was in drag a lot. So much so that in the small town of Provincetown, MA his friends and neighbors always called him by his drag name, Crystal Queer, even when he was his male self. Stef got frustrated and quit doing drag. A few years later, he decided to do drag again as Barbie Que but has been carefully avoiding too much time and attention dressed as Barbie, afraid that becoming more public in his drag persona might cause Stef to be forgotten again.

But the rare lip sync act at benefit dinners wasn't satisfying his need to be glamorous. Last April, at 38, Stef decided he was ready to become more public with Barbie Que and he entered the Miss Gay Massachusetts Drag Pageant for the first time, risking losing himself again.

San Francisco Stories from StoryCorps and KALW: A military man finds peace with his sexuality and his Mormon faith

From KALW | 04:00

Olin Thomas grew up Mormon in the deep south, confused by his homosexuality and deeply in the closet, in no small part because of the church's attitude toward gays. But it turned out that a basic tenet of the Mormon faith was actually what would help him come out, and once he did, he found understanding in some very unexpected places.

Olin sat down in the StoryCorps booth at the Contemporary Jewish Museum of San Francisco with his friend, Hugo Salinas, to tell his story.

Picture_2_small Olin Thomas grew up Mormon in the deep south, confused by his homosexuality and deeply in the closet, in no small part because of the church's attitude toward gays. But it turned out that a basic tenet of the Mormon faith was actually what would help him come out, and once he did, he found understanding in some very unexpected places. Olin sat down in the StoryCorps booth at the Contemporary Jewish Museum of San Francisco with his friend, Hugo Salinas, to tell his story.

StoryCorps: Sue Hyde

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 02:41

Sue Hyde lives in Cambridge, Mass., with her wife, Jade McGleughlin, their daughter, Jesse, 14 and their son, Max, 12. From StoryCorps.

Hyde_small Sue Hyde lives in Cambridge, Mass., with her wife, Jade McGleughlin, their daughter, Jesse, 14 and their son, Max, 12. The makeup of their household is not as rare as it once was and certainly not as rare as it was when Hyde was growing up, in a small town in rural Illinois. Asked by her daughter about the differences between their childhoods, Hyde's response is, "I grew up in one of those very typical families, with a mom and a dad. And there were seven kids." The hardest part, Hyde says, was her sense of being alienated from her family, because of the feelings she had for other girls, feelings "that no one else that I knew at that time had."

SF photographer Dan Nicoletta remembers friend, Harvey Milk

From KALW | 02:47

The movie Milk, based on the life of former city supervisor Harvey Milk, took home two Oscars a couple years ago. Sean Penn won Best Actor for his protrayal of the nation's first openly gay male elected official. Writer Dustin Lance Black won best original screenplay and happened to bring down the house with his acceptance speech.

One of the people who helped shape Dustin Lance Black's script was Dan Nicoletta. He was part of Harvey Milk's close-knit crew who hung out at Milk's camera shop on Castro street. Nicoletta spoke with KALW's Art Persyko and shared his memory of the night Harvey Milk became a San Francisco supervisor.

Picture_1_small The movie Milk, based on the life of former city supervisor Harvey Milk, took home two Oscars a couple years ago. Sean Penn won Best Actor for his protrayal of the nation's first openly gay male elected official. Writer Dustin Lance Black won best original screenplay and happened to bring down the house with his acceptance speech. One of the people who helped shape Dustin Lance Black's script was Dan Nicoletta. He was part of Harvey Milk's close-knit crew who hung out at Milk's camera shop on Castro street. Nicoletta spoke with KALW's Art Persyko and shared his memory of the night Harvey Milk became a San Francisco supervisor.

StoryCorps: John and Paul Brown

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 02:36

John Brown tells his brother Paul, about an encounter with a local radio station in West Virginia.

Brownj_small Life's defining moments can come at surprising times. For John Brown, his life came into focus in 1993, when driving to work one day, he heard a radio program attacking homosexuals and decided to call in to the show....

Skittles by Benj Sullivan-Knoff

From WBEZ | Part of the Louder Than a Bomb 2010 series | 02:58

Benj was a finalist in the 2010 Louder Than a Bomb Teen Poetry Slam. A junior at Northside College Prep in Chicago, Benj says his poem is about how boys can like boys and gay rights.

Ltab2010_ncp_sullivan-knoff-tp_small Benj was a finalist in the 2010 Louder Than a Bomb Teen Poetry  Slam. A junior at Northside College Prep in Chicago, Benj says his poem is about how boys can like boys and gay rights.

Dear First Grade Teacher by AJ Tran

From WBEZ | Part of the Louder Than a Bomb 2012 series | 02:38

Poet AJ Tran, 18, is a senior at Northside College Prep. "Dear First Grade Teacher" is AJ's poetic commentary on gender, how our society teaches young children what 'girls' can do and what 'boys' can do, without leaving enough room for those who may think otherwise.

Ltab2012_aj_small Poet AJ Tran, 18, is a senior at Northside College Prep. This is the second year she has represented her school at Louder Than a Bomb, which advanced to the Final round of competition in the 2012 Festival. Dear First Grade Teacher is AJ's poetic commentary on gender, how our society teaches young children what 'girls' can do and what 'boys' can do, without leaving enough room for those who may think otherwise.

Rosie by Essie Lindzy

From WBEZ | Part of the Louder Than a Bomb 2012 series | 03:08

Poet Essie Lindzy, 18, is a senior at Whitney M. Young Magnet High School. "Rosie" recants the poet's experience with society's perception of the African-American lesbian community and the expectations placed on all women.

Ltab2012_essie_small Poet Essie Lindzy, 18, is a senior at Whitney M. Young Magnet High School. This is her second year participating in Louder Than a Bomb. Rosie recants the poet's experience with society's perception of the African-American lesbian community and the expectations placed on all women.

Miss Smith and Miss Jones

From Susan Kottler | 04:09

When I was growing up in a small, rural city, we didn't even know there was a closet to come out of.

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My kindergarten and first grade teachers were lovely women and half the faculty of our elementary school. They also lived together.

In the past our society was much less focused on sexuality. Same-sex couples lived in rural America, and might have been referred to as "the boys on the farm up the hill" or "the girls who live across from the post office." Occasionally someone would wonder about a couple, "Why didn't either one of them ever marry?" but there seemed to be no ready answer to the question.

I remember "Miss Smith" and "Miss Jones" fondly.

It's Not About That

From City High Radio | 03:31

A teenager who identifies as androgynous wonders what all the fuss is about. Why are people so obsessed with defining their genders? From Zoe Bossier and City High Radio.

Zoeandhervan_small A teenager who considers her gender to be "androgynous" wonders what all the fuss is about. Why are people so obsessed with defining their genders?


Interstitials (Under 2:00)

StoryCorps: Robert Madden

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 01:52

Robert Madden tells his friend Tom Kurthy about coming out to his parents.

Madden_small Robert Madden grew up in Mississippi during the 1960s, and he was close to both of his parents. He explains that he could talk to them about anything. But here, he tells his friend Tom Kurthy about one topic that kept them talking for years.