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Playlist: Election 2016

Compiled By: PRX Editors

 Credit:
Curated Playlist

Compiled by your PRX Editorial team. Let us know about your election pieces.

Political Junkie 2016 Post-Election Show

From Ken Rudin's Political Junkie | Part of the Political Junkie (Specials) series | 53:55

The election is over and, in case you missed it, Donald Trump won. Lisa Desjardins of the PBS NewsHour and Greg Giroux of Bloomberg explain what happened, how it happened, and what’s next. A more detailed conversation with Neal Conan follows which, before the edits, was mostly he and Ken saying “wow” to each other over and over. Finally, with so many people unnerved by the election results, we chat with Sue Elias, a New York therapist, who has advice for those who still can’t believe what happened in Tuesday’s election.

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The election is over and, in case you missed it, Donald Trump won. Lisa Desjardins of the PBS NewsHour and Greg Giroux of Bloomberg explain what happened, how it happened, and what’s next.
A more detailed conversation with Neal Conan follows which, before the edits, was mostly he and Ken saying “wow” to each other over and over.
Finally, with so many people unnerved by the election results, we chat with Sue Elias, a New York therapist, who has advice for those who still can’t believe what happened in Tuesday’s election.

Mortified's Totally Juvenile Election Special

From The Mortified Podcast | 51:58

Need relief from all the juvenile antics of campaign season? "MORTIFIED'S TOTALLY JUVENILE ELECTION SPECIAL" is your antidote to the political tantrums featuring stories of the strange campaigns we waged as kids. Join the makers of "THE MORTIFIED PODCAST"-- along with their special guest, NPR White House correspondent TAMARA KEITH-- for this offbeat, hour-long celebration of the politics of adolescence (and the adolescence of politics).

Mortified_-_circle_logo_small Need relief from all the juvenile antics of campaign season? "MORTIFIED'S TOTALLY JUVENILE ELECTION SPECIAL" is your antidote to the political tantrums featuring stories of the strange campaigns we waged as kids. Join the makers of "THE MORTIFIED PODCAST"-- along with their special guest, NPR White House correspondent TAMARA KEITH-- for this offbeat, hour-long celebration of the politics of adolescence (and the adolescence of politics). 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Mortified is an international storytelling project where adults share their emabrrassing childhood writings--old diaries, letters, poems and beyond-- in front of total strangers. The project celebrates its 15th anniversary in Fall 2016.  Hosted by Mortified founder, David Nadelberg, the hour-long radio special features storytellers recorded at Mortified events in Oregon, California, Maryland, New York, Ireland. Mortified is a familiar presence on public radio with appearances on This American Life, All Things Considered, Morning Edition, Talk of the Nation, The Business, Take Two, KCRW Guest DJ Project, Kojo Nnmandi Show, Here & Now, and more. Known for its raw, emotional brand of humor, Mortified creates live events, podcasts, film, TV projects, animated shorts, books, workshops, and even an adult summer camp. Discover the world of Mortified at: getmortified.com.

Political Junkie 2016 Presidential Election Special

From Ken Rudin's Political Junkie | Part of the Political Junkie (Specials) series | 53:58

After a year-and-a-half of heated primary battles, fierce debates and explosive rhetoric, the historic presidential election of 2016 is finally coming to a close. Join Political Junkie Ken Rudin and an all-star panel of political reporters, analysts and special guests for a full hour of analysis of the final days of the presidential campaign. Plus, Ken and his guests cover the key Senate and gubernatorial races of interest from across the country.

2016_election_special_logo_small After a year-and-a-half of heated primary battles, fierce debates and explosive rhetoric, the historic presidential election of 2016 is finally coming to a close. Join Political Junkie Ken Rudin and an all-star panel of political reporters, commentators and special guests for a full hour of analysis of the final days of the presidential campaign. Plus, Ken and his guests cover the key Senate and gubernatorial races of interest from across the country.

Tune in to hear a broad range of perspectives on the election, and consider how the election results could affect the makeup of Congress, the Supreme Court, and the country over the next four years. And of course, you’ll enjoy a healthy dose of Ken’s punchy humor and insightful historical perspective.

Ken's guests include:
Mara Liasson, national political correspondent for NPR
Aaron Blake, national political reporter for The Washington Post
Vin Weber, Republican strategist, former Congressman (R-Minnesota)
Mark MellmanDemocratic pollster; CEO of The Mellman Group
Jennifer Duffysenior editor covering U.S. Senate races for The Cook Political Report
David Wasserman, House editor for The Cook Political Report

This special is a standalone program that is suitable for use at any time throughout the weekend preceding and up to Election Day.

More information about this special is available on our website

Wellesley Commencement Address: Hillary Rodham Clinton

From Wellesley College | 12:02

This is the full audio from the 1969 Wellesley College commencement speech delivered by Hillary Rodham Clinton, then Hillary Rodham, the first ever student address at the school.

Rsz_hillary_rodham_speaks_at_1969_commencement_small This is the full audio from the 1969 Wellesley College commencement speech delivered by Hillary Rodham Clinton, then Hillary Rodham, the first ever student address at the school. 

It was an era of intense social change and activism, and in the speech 21-year old Clinton offers her views on empathy and protest, giving listeners a chance to hear the young student leader finding her public voice for the first time.

 Follow this link for a 4-minuted excerpted version of the speech: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2CAUOa5m5nY

Contenders (Hour Special)

From Radio Diaries | Part of the Contenders series | 53:25

Portraits of some of America’s most groundbreaking and unusual presidential candidates...who never won the white house.

Bryan_t_small Portraits of some of America’s most groundbreaking and unusual presidential candidates, who never won the white house. From Margaret Chase Smith to Shirley Chisholm… from William Jennings Bryan to Adlai Stevenson… some candidates make history, even when they lose. 

This one-hour special spans 150 years and features the stories of six losing presidential candidates:
Victoria Woodhull: The First Woman to Run for President
William Jennings Bryan: The Speech That Changed American Politics
Adlai Stevenson: Believing in Words in the Age of Television
Alben Barkley: The Veep
Margaret Chase Smith: Cold War Hawk in Pearls
Shirley Chisholm: The Politics of Principle
 
Contenders is presented by Radio Diaries and PRX. For more information visit www.radiodiaries.org. 
*News hole and 2 floating breaks 

Campaign '68

From American Public Media | 59:01

Many see similarities between the presidential election campaign of 2016 and one almost half a century later.

The 1968 presidential campaign was one of the most dramatic and significant contests for the White House in the 20th century. It was a close, bitterly-fought campaign in a raucous, bloody year.

Ultimately, the Democratic Party lost its decades-long grip on national power, making way for the rise of Republican conservatism that profoundly reshaped American public policy for the next 40 years.

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Many see similarities between the presidential election campaign of 2016 and one almost half a century earlier.

The 1968 presidential campaign was one of the most dramatic and significant contests for the White House in the 20th century. It was a close, bitterly-fought campaign in a raucous, bloody year. 

Ultimately, the Democratic Party lost its decades-long grip on national power, making way for the rise of Republican conservatism that profoundly reshaped American public policy for the next 40 years.   

 

Humankind special: The Right to Vote (2016)

From Humankind | Part of the Humankind Specials series | 59:00

Newly updated (2016), produced in association with WGBH/Boston, ideal for broadcast this election year: A documentary about the much-contested right to vote in America: from slaves freed after the Civil War, to women's suffrage, to the Civil Rights movement, to today's debate over whether voters should be required to show ID at the polls. We trace the long battle over who may participate in democracy's most basic function. Includes coverage of major summer 2016 court rulings. Program details and mp3 audition: http://www.humanmedia.org/rtv/

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Newly updated (2016), produced in association with WGBH/Boston, ideal for broadcast this election year: A documentary about the much-contested right to vote in America — from slaves freed after the Civil War, to women's suffrage, to the Civil Rights movement, to today's debate over whether voters should be required to show ID at the polls. We trace the long battle over who may participate in democracy's most basic function. Includes coverage of major summer 2016 court rulings. Program details and mp3 audition: http://www.humanmedia.org/rtv/

When the United States was founded, only white male property-owners could vote in most states. Gradually, the franchise has expanded —  but the debate continues to this day. In this fast-moving documentary by David Freudberg, we trace the fascinating twists and turns of a core American activity, with the nation's leading historian on this topic, Harvard's Alexander Keyssar. We hear the personal story of Univ. of Florida religion professor Gwendolyn Zoharah Simmons, who at age 19, against the wishes of her parents, participated in the 1964 Mississippi Freedom Summer Project for voter registration, when three young civil rights workers were murdered. Also, historian Faye Dudden recounts highlights of the women's suffrage movement.

In addition, long-time Washington Post executive editor Leonard Downie Jr. reviews the scant evidence of voter impersonation (a flashpoint in the controversy over whether voter IDs should be required — the subject of a flurry of recent court rulings). Also weighing in on voter IDs are former Secretary of State Colin Powell; Governor Pat McCrory (R-N.C.); Myrna Perez of NYU's Brennan Center for Justice; and former Justice Department voting rights legal expert, Gerald Hebert. And we listen to the story of a convicted felon in Florida, seeing his right to vote.

The Right to Vote is relevant anytime, and especially in this federal election year.

The Originalist

From L.A. Theatre Works | Part of the L.A. Theatre Works series | 01:57:58

A timely new play about a polarizing figure.

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Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia believed that the United States Constitution is the most reliable source for a fair interpretation of the law as it is applied today. He was, in other words, an “originalist.” But aren’t the laws written over 200 years ago subject to interpretation - or even guesswork? Edward Gero stars as the late Justice Scalia in John Strand’s insightful look at Scalia’s life and legal philosophy. Also starring Kerry Warren as Cat and Harlan Work as Brad. Produced in conjunction with Arena Stage in Washington D.C. 
Includes a post-show discussion about Antonin Scalia with Nina Totenberg, NPR’s Legal Affairs Correspondent.

Peace Around Political Polarization

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 01:00:01

On this edition of Peace Talks Radio, three guests who’ll touch on just a few of the many reasons political polarization continues in the U.S. Each have a few ideas and programs that could close the gap, even a little bit. Ideas that you could try that just might lessen political polarization at your dinner table, in your neighborhood, your state, and around the country.

Political_conversation_small This isn't a program about the current electoral races. Rather, it looks at a few of the possible causes of and solutions to political polarization.  Statistics show that polarization of liberals and conservatives is on the rise in the US. How come? This program doesn't have time to review all of the possible causes including money, media, and isolationism. But, we will explore some ideas such as biological disgust, voting issues, and collaborative conversations. We focus on solutions that individuals and groups can take to lessen political polarization at the dinner table, in your neighborhood, and around the country.

We'll meet Jessie Fields, a New York state advocate for open primaries, Ravi Iyer, from California, who helps
manage the civilpolitics.org website, and first Rob Karwath with the "Speak Your Peace" program in Duluth, Minnesota.

Peace Around Political Polarization

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Half Hour Episodes series | 29:00

On this edition of Peace Talks Radio, three guests who’ll touch on just a few of the many reasons political polarization continues in the U.S. Each have a few ideas and programs that could close the gap, even a little bit. Ideas that you could try that just might lessen political polarization at your dinner table, in your neighborhood, your state, and around the country.

Political_conversation_small This isn't a program about the current electoral races. Rather, it looks at a few of the possible causes and solutions of political polarization.  Statistics show that polarization of liberals and conservatives is on the rise in the US. How come? This program doesn't have time to review all of the possible causes including money, media, and isolationism. But, we will explore some ideas such as biological disgust, voting issues, and collaborative conversations. We focus on solutions that individuals and groups can take to lessen political polarization at the dinner table, in your neighborhood, and around the country.

We'll meet Jessie Fields, a New York state advocate for open primaries, Ravi Iyer, from California, who helps
manage the civilpolitics.org website, and first Rob Karwath with the "Speak Your Peace" program in Duluth, Minnesota.

Immigrants & Elections Pt. 2: Barriers to Voting

From Making Contact | Part of the Making Contact series | 29:00

The right to vote in the US is one of its most cherished and hard-fought rights. But not everyone has equal access to the polls. In this Immigrants & Elections show, we explore barriers to voting for immigrants and historically disenfranchised voters.

Florita_joseph_campbell_small Program #43-16
Begin Date 10/26/16. End date 04/26/17.

Promo available from:

http://www.radioproject.org/sound/2016/MakingCon_161026_promo.mp3

Please call us if you carry us - 510-251-1332 and we will list your station on our website. If you excerpt, please credit early and often.  

The G.O.P: A History of the Republican Party

From BackStory with the American History Guys | Part of the BackStory with the American History Guys: Full Episodes series | 54:00

Donald Trump has clinched the Republican party presidential nomination, and some political pundits wonder if his nomination represents a watershed for the Republican party.  On this episode of BackStory, we unpack the origins, evolution, and reinvention of the Grand Old Party.  From its birth in 1854 by anti-slavery activists in the North, to the party of small government and low taxes, we look at how the G.O.P.  has reinvented itself at various points in its history.

Gop-e1464298936294_small Donald Trump has clinched the Republican party presidential nomination, and some political pundits wonder if his nomination represents a watershed for the Republican party.  On this episode of BackStory, we unpack the origins, evolution, and reinvention of the Grand Old Party.  From its birth in 1854 by anti-slavery activists in the North, to the party of small government and low taxes, we look at how the G.O.P.  has reinvented itself at various points in its history.

Political Junkie (Minisodes) (Series)

Produced by Ken Rudin's Political Junkie

Ken Rudin’s Political Junkie brings a fresh take to political conversation -- featuring energetic discussions, rich historical context, and plenty of bad jokes. Political Junkie's Minisodes offer a timely and informative discussion of a top political story each week.

Most recent piece in this series:

Political Junkie Minisode 12-15-16

From Ken Rudin's Political Junkie | Part of the Political Junkie (Minisodes) series | 08:59

Ken-rudin-v1 Donald Trump has finally decided on a nominee for secretary of state, but it turns out that this may be the most controversial Cabinet appointee of all. Carl Hulse of the New York Times reviews Rex Tillerson's relationships with Vladimir Putin and Russia and speculates on what could be a difficult confirmation hearing.

Ken Rudin's Political Junkie (Series)

Produced by Ken Rudin's Political Junkie

Ken Rudin’s Political Junkie brings a fresh take to political conversation — featuring energetic discussions, rich historical context, and plenty of bad jokes. Host Ken Rudin brings his years of experience on the campaign trail to the fore as he highlights notable moments in political history, and looks ahead to the biggest stories on the national scene.

Most recent piece in this series:

208: Political Junkie Full-Hour Show #208, 12/8/2017

From Ken Rudin's Political Junkie | Part of the Ken Rudin's Political Junkie series | 53:58

Ken-rudin-v1

The resignation of John Conyers and, apparently, Al Franken -- coming at the same time the president of the United States is rooting for a Roy Moore victory in Alabama -- is just one indication of how the two parties see the issue of sexual harassment in Congress.  Carl Hulse of the New York Times explains the disparate party viewpoints.

 
The death Sunday of John Anderson, the former Republican congressman from Illinois who made a bid for president in 1980, led to two segments this week.  First, Ron Rapoport, a professor at William and Mary College in Virginia and an expert on third party and independent candidates, says that Anderson played a significant role in the 1980 election ... but by being denied a chance to appear in the debates, his influence was severely limited.  And we also speak with Diane Anderson, one of John Anderson's five children, who talks about her dad less as a politician and more as a human being.

 
And we replay an interview we conducted three years ago with former Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott, whose ill-advised comments praising Strom Thurmond at his 2002 birthday celebration helped end his congressional career.

Political Junkie Special - Great Moments in Convention History

From Ken Rudin's Political Junkie | Part of the Political Junkie (Specials) series | 53:58

Join Political Junkie Ken Rudin on a journey through political history as we revisit memorable and historic moments from national party conventions of the past, and consider how the role of conventions in the presidential race has evolved from then to today.

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In recent years, the national party conventions may have seemed like infomercials for the parties’ respective presidential nominees, but many conventions of the past have been filled with moments that were contentious, memorable, and historic: The Southern walkout in protest of Hubert Humphrey’s pro-civil rights speech in 1948. Geraldine Ferraro becoming the first woman on a major-party ticket in 1984. Everett Dirksen singling out Thomas Dewey for his past failures in 1952. And of course, the utter mayhem in Chicago in 1968.

Join Political Junkie Ken Rudin on a journey through political history as we revisit memorable and historic moments from national party conventions of the past, and consider how the role of conventions in the presidential race has evolved from then to today.

Ken's guests include:
Lee Edwards, distinguished fellow at The Heritage Foundation
Barbara Eagleton, widow of Sen. Tom Eagleton, 1972 Democratic VP candidate
Judy Goldsmith, former president of National Organization for Women
Stephen Hess, senior fellow emeritus at The Brookings Institution

Plus, we revisit Ken's past interviews with:
George McGovern, 1972 Democratic presidential candidate
Walter Mondale, 1984 Democratic presidential candidate
Michael Dukakis, 1988 Democratic presidential candidate

Additional information about this special is available on our website

Trump and the Politics of Paranoia

From MIchael Goldfarb | 27:30

Donald Trump and the tradition of using fear to win elections in America

22-trump Donald Trump is just the latest in a long line of purveyors of fear to rise in American politics. He has reached the top trading on what Richard Hofstadter titel "The Paranoid Style in American Politics." I this documentary, Michael Goldfarb interviews leading historians to tell the story of the "paranoid style." He also interviews early Trump supporters.

Election 2016: Unreality TV

From Open Source | Part of the Open Source with Christopher Lydon series | 58:30

Ron Suskind is in the studio, asking: How do we talk about political reality from so deep inside the world of the reality show?

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Barack Obama has kept his distance from this campaign, but he did intervene last month to remind Americans that they’re not voting to give someone a recording contract: “This is a really serious job. This is not entertainment. This is not a reality show.”

Hillary Clinton likes that line, too, and has used it more pointedly against the former host of The Apprentice: “You can’t say to the head of another nation’s government… if you disagree with them, ’you’re fired!’ That is not the way it works in the real world!”

It’s true, of course—but the rise of Trump reminds us that American politics lost their humble, aldermanic relationship with a simple “real world” a long way back.

Obama’s own victory was telegraphed and televised—the dignified, better-than-human First Black Presidentgot screen-tested more than once in Morgan Freeman and Dennis Haysbert. And a Brooklyn-ready media rollout teased an age of “hope” and “change” that the candidate was unable fully to bring about.

The gap between the real and the imagined isn’t a new phenomenon—it’s old as politics itself, and only accelerated by TV. As early as 1960, Norman Mailer read John F. Kennedy aright—not as a job applicant but as an avatar for two Americas, old and new:

 

this candidate for all his record; his good, sound, conventional liberal record has a patina of that other life, the second American life, the long electric night with the fires of neon leading down the highway to the murmur of jazz.

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The author and journalist Ron Suskind is in our studio—he was the one who transcribed a gem of ideology from a secret source in the Bush White House:

The aide said that guys like me were “in what we call the reality-based community,” which he defined as people who “believe that solutions emerge from your judicious study of discernible reality. That’s not the way the world really works anymore,” he continued. “We’re an empire now, and when we act, we create our own reality. And while you’re studying that reality—judiciously, as you will—we’ll act again, creating other new realities, which you can study too, and that’s how things will sort out. We’re history’s actors… and you, all of you, will be left to just study what we do.”

Trump may be imperial in that same sense, if Matt Lauer’s botched tackle of the two presidential candidates is anything to go by.

alliekrause-nussbaumtalk-29-630x420

For more on the realm of unreality we’re in, we turn to Veep‘s Frank Rich, and The New Yorker’s Emily Nussbaum (above), if the age of mass-media politics that began with the glow of Kennedy is ending with the groan of Trump—himself made-for-TV. His unpredictability, his familiar pout, his Lorax coloring and proportions are keeping him in a race and a conversation he might have lost, on the merits, long ago.

To millions of Americans, Trump has some real effects; he represents hope—maybe for boardroom efficiency or a frank simplification of political questions—or a change in atmosphere, away from managed expectations and polite coastal contempt. His may be a dark fantasy, but he sees that politicians, like TV personae real and semi-real, are in the business of fantasy, and that the “show horse” part of the job can’t be so easily shrugged off.

How do we talk about political reality from so deep inside the world of the reality show?

Defecting from the Donald

From Stephanie Lepp | Part of the Reckonings series | 35:09

Media coverage of Donald Trump is incessant, but misses a seemingly critical question: why do Trump supporters defect? Alex Mamach was a staunch Trump supporter, and made a surprising switch from Donald Trump to Hillary Clinton. His story sheds light on why millions of Americans support Trump, and what might move them in a different direction.

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Alex Mamach is a young white Chicago native who grew up in a poor and diverse suburb of Chicago. He was a staunch supporter of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, but made a surprising switch to Hillary Clinton as part of a broader worldview transformation from focusing on his own self-interest to caring about the collective interest. His story sheds light on why millions of Americans are voting for Trump in the presidential election, and what might move them in a different direction.

Our media landscape is saturated with Trump, yet this piece probes a critical question that has gained surprisingly little coverage: why do Trump supporters defect? The result is a refreshingly hopeful and illuminating story about the Donald.

Key quotes:
  • 'Supporting Trump felt absolutely cathartic. He felt like the personification of my anger with the established political system, and with people who had been insisting that my constituency didn't exist or that we didn't deserve to be paid attention to.'
  • 'One of my co-workers said, 'Trump supporters are without exception the worst people I've ever met, they're almost sub-human.' And I'm standing there thinking, you know, we're friends, but I think I'll keep my mouth shut.'
  • 'When I walked in to vote in the Illinois primary, I had a crisis of conscience. It became so clear: yes, I want to vote for Trump because it's my turn now. But that's not who I want to be and that's how I want to see our country.'

Donald Trump is Breaking News

From Open Source | Part of the Open Source with Christopher Lydon series | 58:30

How does a media establishment cover an anti-establishment revolt? Has the frenzy diverted American journalism from its fourth-estate duty: of holding candidates accountable?

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This spring and summer, millions of Americans will go to the polls and vote. For most of us, our political participation begins and ends at the ballot box. The rest is mediated: through a mix of respectable newspapers and radio firebrands, punditry, hearsay, and Tweets.

The play of politics came with a set of old-saw formulas. The respectable candidates ended up winningAd spending buys votesGaffes are costly. And the party decides.

None of that has proven true this unconventional year. So maybe it’s no surprise that the big papers and networks seem to have first missed, then dismissed, then discouraged the popular movements behind Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders.

This exciting, profane, profound election has served as chum on the water for a media industry that was already agitated by the Internet, “disintermediation,” and vanishing income. 

But has the frenzy diverted American journalism from its fourth-estate duty: of holding candidates accountable? Giving voice to the voiceless? Referring readers to history and policy? Staying straight and honest with the citizenry? Or is that all 20th-century nostalgia?

Some of our guests, and most of our Twitter followers, feel that the big story this year was of a confrontation between a dissatisfied people and an establishment — that goes for the media, too. The big papers and networks seemed to have first missed, then dismissed, then discouraged the popular movements behind  Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump. But that’s just the beginning — there were lots of weird media stories on the trail this year.

Political Junkie Special - Great Moments in Presidential Debates

From Ken Rudin's Political Junkie | Part of the Political Junkie (Specials) series | 53:58

Join Political Junkie Ken Rudin for a review of many great moments from the history of televised presidential debates, with commentary from several journalists and historians on how those moments may have helped pave the way for the winner to reach the White House.

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In 1960, the first televised presidential debates were held between John F. Kennedy and Richard Nixon, giving voters a unique opportunity to see the two candidates up close. Since 1976, all the major party nominees for president have participated in televised debates. The issues ranged from domestic concerns to foreign policy. But these debates are also remembered to many dramatic moments and memorable gaffes that have often helped decide the outcome of the elections.

Join Political Junkie Ken Rudin for a review of many of these great moments from past presidential debates, with commentary from several journalists and historians on how those moments may have helped pave the way for the winner to reach the White House.

Ken's guests include: 

  • Bob Schieffer, former moderator of CBS’ Face the Nation and moderator of debates in 2004, 2008 and 2012
  • Marvin Kalb, former CBS and NBC News correspondent; panelist in second 1984 presidential debate
  • Jon Margolis, former Washington correspondent for The Chicago Tribune; panelist in 1988 VP debate
  • Alan Schroeder, journalism professor at Northeastern University and author of Presidential Debates: Risky Business on the Campaign Trail

  • Additional information about this special is available on our website

    Becoming Bernie: His Rise and His Record

    From Vermont Public Radio | 53:59

    As Bernie Sanders’ political campaign continues across the country, Vermont Public Radio examines the rise and record of the Democratic presidential candidate in an hour-long news program.

    Becoming-bernie-vermont-public-radio_small

    In 'Becoming Bernie', VPR News explores the forces that shaped the life and politics of the self-described democratic-socialist, from his early days in Brooklyn through his candidacy announcement in Burlington, Vermont in 2015.

    'Becoming Bernie' revisits the slim victory that installed Sanders as the mayor of Vermont’s largest city and assesses his years in the job. The program considers Sanders’ tenure in the U.S. House and Senate, and his record in Washington. It also examines the line he has walked to balance his Independent status and his relationships with progressives, Democrats and socialists.

    'Becoming Bernie' is hosted by VPR’s Jane Lindholm and Alex Keefe, and reported by VPR News staff. The program is produced by Special Projects Producer Lynne McCrea. 

    The project includes extensive digital features including archive and original photos, video, bonus audio and expanded reporting. The web feature also includes full text translations in French and SpanishStations interested in featuring the project online can contact Angela Evancie at aevancie@vpr.net. 

    * Note to Stations: Please be advised that "Becoming Bernie" contains an appearance of a political candidate, which should be noted in the station’s public inspection file. If the program is not broadcast during a news program or as part of a regularly scheduled news interview program, broadcast of the program could result in demands for “equal opportunities.”