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Playlist: Suicide Prevention

Compiled By: PRX Editors

 Credit: <http://www.flickr.com/photos/worldsurfer/>World Surfer</a>
Image by: World Surfer 
Curated Playlist

September is Suicide Prevention Month. Air these then or any time.

Stories about how complicated suicide is, with perspectives from attempt survivors, family, and friends.

Four Seconds: Suicide off the Golden Gate Bridge

From Jake Warga | 13:38

Search for meaning in a friend's suicide.

Ggbridgesmall_small A portrait of a friend, and a personal struggle for meaning. Opens: "It takes four seconds after jumping off the Golden Gate bridge to hit the ocean 220 feet below. Four long seconds. Last October my friend Phil was riding his bicycle over the bridge. Around mid-span, he stopped, took off his helmet?and jumped to his death. One-one thousand. Two-one thousand. Three-one thousand. Four-one thousand... 8min version aired 11/28/05 "AllThingsConsidered" This is the 12min version--all things considered (13:10 with out music). 8min available, but not encouraged. Brother of Phil: http://www.thisamericanlife.org/Radio_Episode.aspx?sched=1061

Splash

From Rich Halten | 18:52

From a bridge famous for suicide jumps, the story of one lucky survivor and how a broken neck and collapsed lung made him a new man.

Playing
Splash
From
Rich Halten

Skyway_bridge_vignette_small The Sunshine Skyway bridge spans the mouth of Tampa Bay on the west coast of Florida. It carries thousands of cars everyday. It's also become one of the top ten places to end your life. This is the story of the many who jumped, one lucky guy who survived, and how broken bones and a collapsed lung made him a new man. "Splash" made its web debut on Transom.org.

This School Year, a Commitment to Mental Health

From Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) | Part of the Substance Abuse & Mental Illness: The Impact on America’s Communities series | 05:23

High school teacher Joe Vulopas has a conversation with his son J.J., a recent high school graduate, about the academic and social pressures young people face today and their work together creating positive mental health environments in schools across the nation.

Vulopas1_small Following the tragic death of high school sophomore Phil Cardin in 2004, English teacher Joe Vulopas worked with students to form Aevidum, a community-based program with the mission of creating positive mental health environments for students. In this segment, Joe has a conversation with his son, J.J., about the day Phil took his life, the academic and social pressures young people face today and how Aevidum creates cultures of mental health advocacy in schools across the nation. David Wilson of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) lends his expertise to the discussion.

Despair, Inherited

From Catarina Martins | 11:10

In most families, mental health can be a taboo topic. But not in the House family. Jeff and Tenley’s relationship is not your usual father and daughter relationship. Depression has brought them closer together.

This story was produced with Transom.org at the Transom Story Workshop (spring 2015).

Tenleyjeff2_small In most families, mental health can be a taboo topic. But not in the House family. Jeff and Tenley’s relationship is not your usual father and daughter relationship. Depression has brought them closer together. This story was produced with Transom.org at the Transom Story Workshop (spring 2015).

Brian's Story

From Jake Warga | 22:52

The producer of this piece sat on a bench one night with his friend Brian, who talked about why he tried to kill himself. He eventually succeeded.

Playing
Brian's Story
From
Jake Warga

Brian2_small My friend Brian and I sat on a bench one night and talked about why he tried to kill himself. He eventually succeeded. (My first Radio story, 2001)

Guns and Suicide: The Hidden Toll (Feature)

From With Good Reason | 02:27

The gun control debate often centers around homicides and the fear of someone else with a gun. However, attention is rarely paid to the link between gun ownership and suicides. Allison Quantz reports on a new study that says more guns equal more suicides.

Houston_gun_show_at_the_george_r The gun control debate often centers around homicides and the fear of someone else with a gun. However, attention is rarely paid to the link between gun ownership and suicides. Allison Quantz reports on a new study that says more guns equal more suicides.

Here There is No Moon (U.S. version 26:37)

From Susan Stone | 26:35

A portrait of the long, dark tunnel of the suicidal mind.

Jumper_small A college student leaps from a bridge, a young mother walks into a lake, a widow clings to a ledge. Impulse. Depression. Illness. Grief. “Here There Is No Moon” is a portrait of the suicidal mind from the perspective of those who have survived the bullet, the bottle, the jump --and those who have helped in rescue and intervention. There is the limbo in which some live: Why am I still here? Will I try again? Can I resume the life I almost left? For others, there is relief in having a second chance at life. And then there are the doctors, philosophers, counselors, and poets who grapple with suicide as epidemic, violence, and siren song. But the fundamental question remains: Why does one commit suicide, while another does not? No one really knows the answer. True stories from those who might. This piece was featured on Transom.org. For more information visit the above "Website" link.

Here There is No Moon (European version 31:54)

From Susan Stone | 31:55

a portrait of the long dark tunnel of the suicidal mind

Jumper_small A college student leaps from a bridge, a young mother walks into a lake, a widow clings to a ledge. Impulse. Depression. Illness. Grief. “Here There Is No Moon” is a portrait of the suicidal mind from the perspective of those who have survived the bullet, the bottle, the jump --and those who have helped in rescue and intervention. There is the limbo in which some live: Why am I still here? Will I try again? Can I resume the life I almost left? For others, there is relief in having a second chance at life. And then there are the doctors, philosophers, counselors, and poets, like Sylvia Plath in her own words, who grapple with suicide as epidemic, violence, and siren song. But the fundamental question remains: Why does one commit suicide, while another does not? No one really knows the answer. Personal stories from those who might.