%s1 / %s2

Playlist: Shorts

Compiled By: Roland Foster

 Credit:

Short pieces

Record Bin Roulette - What's Up, Doc?

From John Kessler | 03:52

Weekly 4 minute binge of musical rarities, oddities and classics, this time we examine Doctors. With Aretha Franklin, The Beatles and The Chipmunks.

Three-stooges-doctors_small Weekly 4 minute binge of musical rarities, oddities and classics, this time we examine Doctors. With Aretha Franklin, The Beatles and The Chipmunks.

Record Bin Roulette - Woman

From John Kessler | 03:57

Weekly 4 minute dash through musical rarities, oddities and classics. We pay tribute to Women with songs from Etta James, Peggy Lee, Helen Reddy, balanced by John Lennon, Neil Diamond and Elvis.

Peggy_small Weekly 4 minute dash through musical rarities, oddities and classics. We pay tribute to Women with songs from Etta James, Peggy Lee, Helen Reddy, balanced by John Lennon, Neil Diamond and Elvis.

Record Bin Roulette - Sleep

From John Kessler | 03:54

Weekly 4 minute jaunt through musical rarities, oddities and classics. This week we lull you with Little Willie John, Petula Clark and The Beatles.
Special cameos from Groucho Marx and The Three Stooges.

Bobby_lewis_small Weekly 4 minute jaunt through musical rarities, oddities and classics. This week we lull you with Little Willie John, Petula Clark and The Beatles. Special cameos from Groucho Marx and The Three Stooges.

Record Bin Roulette - The Election

From John Kessler | 03:59

Weekly 4 minute jaunt through popular music oddities, rarities and classics. This time we ponder the political animal with Johnny Cash, Alice Cooper and Bob Dylan.

Alice_small Weekly 4 minute jaunt through popular music oddities, rarities and classics. This time we ponder the political animal with Johnny Cash, Alice Cooper and Bob Dylan.

Record Bin Roulette - Hawaii

From John Kessler | 03:58

Weekly 4 minute excursion through musical rarities, oddities and classics. This time we go Hawaiian with Elvis Presley, Don Ho, Ethel Merman and The Ventures.

Annette_small Weekly 4 minute excursion through musical rarities, oddities and classics. This time we go Hawaiian with Elvis Presley, Don Ho, Ethel Merman and The Ventures.

Record Bin Roulette - Politics

From John Kessler | 03:48

Weekly 4 minute jaunt through musical rarities, oddities and classics. This time a look at pop music and politics with Rage Against The Machine, Nicky Minaj and Frank Sinatra.

Rage_small Weekly 4 minute jaunt through musical rarities, oddities and classics. This time a look at pop music and politics with Rage Against The Machine, Nicky Minaj and Frank Sinatra.

Record Bin Roulette - The Telephone

From John Kessler | 03:57

Weekly 4 minute dash through musical rarities, oddities and classics. This time we pick up the phone with Glenn Miller, Wilson Pickett, Astrud Gilberto and special cameo by Lily Tomlin.

Phone_small Weekly 4 minute dash through musical rarities, oddities and classics. This time we pick up the phone with Glenn Miller, Wilson Pickett, Astrud Gilberto and special cameo by Lily Tomlin.

Record Bin Roulette - Feuds

From John Kessler | 03:53

Weekly 4 minute loop de loop through pop music history, this time FEUDS with Mozart & Salieri, Beyonce & Etta James, and Neil Young and Lynyrd Skynyrd.

Duel_small Weekly 4 minute loop de loop through pop music history, this time FEUDS with Mozart & Salieri, Beyonce & Etta James, and Neil Young and Lynyrd Skynyrd.

Record Bin Roulette - Choirs

From John Kessler | 03:52

Weekly 4 minute romp through musical rarities, oddities and classics. This time we look for choirs in popular music, with The Rolling Stones, Pink Floyd, The Beatles and The Swingle Singers!

Swingle_small Weekly 4 minute romp through musical rarities, oddities and classics. This time we look for choirs in popular music, with The Rolling Stones, Pink Floyd, The Beatles and The Swingle Singers!

Record Bin Roulette - Age

From John Kessler | 03:54

Weekly 4 minute binge of musical rarities, oddities and classics. This time we take on age with Frank Sinatra, The Beatles, and Peter Pan.

Marchoftime_small Weekly 4 minute binge of musical rarities, oddities and classics. This time we take on age with Frank Sinatra, The Beatles, and Peter Pan.

Record Bin Roulette - The Sun

From John Kessler | 03:51

4 minutes of musical rarities, oddities and classics, this week, songs about and inspired by the Sun. With The Beatles, John Denver and the Fifth Dimension.

Solarflare_small 4 minutes of musical rarities, oddities and classics, this week, songs about and inspired by the Sun. With The Beatles, John Denver and the Fifth Dimension.

Record Bin Roulette - Dreams

From John Kessler | 03:54

Weekly 4 minute dash through musical oddities, rarities and classics, this week it's Dreams with Enrico Caruso, Ella Fitzgerald and (yikes) Katy Perry.

Morpheus_small Weekly 4 minute dash through musical oddities, rarities and classics, this week it's Dreams with Enrico Caruso, Ella Fitzgerald and (yikes) Katy Perry.

Record Bin Roulette - The Slammer

From John Kessler | 03:53

4 minute weekly spin through musical oddities, rarities and classics. This week a quick trip to the hoosegow with The Kingston Trio, Johnny Cash and The Soggy Bottom Boys.

Cashfolsom_small 4 minute weekly spin through musical oddities, rarities and classics. This week a quick trip to the hoosegow with The Kingston Trio, Johnny Cash and The Soggy Bottom Boys.

Record Bin Roulette - Time

From John Kessler | 03:53

4 minute weekly stumble through musical oddities, rarities and classics. This week the heady topic of TIME...with Tony Bennett, Pink Floyd and Albert Einstein explains relativity.

Time_small 4 minute weekly stumble through musical oddities, rarities and classics. This week the heady topic of TIME...with Tony Bennett, Pink Floyd and Albert Einstein explains relativity.

Record Bin Roulette - Thanksgiving

From John Kessler | 03:43

4 minute breeze of musical oddities, rarities and classics...this week, songs of thanks with The Beatles, Maurice Chevalier and Bob Hope.

Turkey_small 4 minute breeze of musical oddities, rarities and classics...this week, songs of thanks with The Beatles, Maurice Chevalier and Bob Hope.

Record Bin Roulette - Happiness

From John Kessler | 03:52

Weekly 4 minute musical journey unearthing rarities, oddities and classics. This week, Happiness with Bobby McFerrin, The Turtles and The Partridge Family

Smiley_small Weekly 4 minute musical journey unearthing rarities, oddities and classics. This week, Happiness with Bobby McFerrin, The Turtles and The Partridge Family

Record Bin Roulette - The Jingle

From John Kessler | 03:39

A weekly excavation of musical rarities, oddities and classics. This week, a look a the history of the advertising jingle, from Wheaties to Lucky Strikes.

Radiomag_small A weekly excavation of musical rarities, oddities and classics. This week, a look a the history of the advertising jingle, from Wheaties to Lucky Strikes.

Record Bin Roulette - Real Events

From John Kessler | 03:50

Weekly 4 minute binge of musical rarities, oddities and classics. This time we get real with songs about stuff that actually happened. With Deep Purple, U2, Don Mclean and Lou Reed.

41-fh-qh0zl Weekly 4 minute binge of musical rarities, oddities and classics. This time we get real with songs about stuff that actually happened. With Deep Purple, U2, Don Mclean and Lou Reed.

Record Bin Roulette - Reefer Madness

From John Kessler | 03:55

Weekly 4 minute overdose of musical rarities and classics, this time, in honor of Washington and Colorado's vote to legalize cannabis, it's Reefer Madness, with Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Tom Petty and Cab Calloway, with a special appearance of Puff The Magic Dragon.

Reefer_madness_small Weekly 4 minute overdose of musical rarities and classics, this time, in honor of Washington and Colorado's vote to legalize cannabis, it's Reefer Madness, with Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Tom Petty and Cab Calloway, with a special appearance of Puff The Magic Dragon.

Record Bin Roulette - Mr. Businessman

From John Kessler | 03:46

Weekly 4 minute jaunt through musical oddities, rarities and classics. This time we enter the high-powered world of business with Ray Stevens, BTO and Dolly Parton, with a special cameo by Principal Skinner/

Bizlp_small Weekly 4 minute jaunt through musical oddities, rarities and classics. This time we enter the high-powered world of business with Ray Stevens, BTO and Dolly Parton, with a special cameo by Principal Skinner/

Record Bin Roulette - Work Songs

From John Kessler | 03:34

Weekly 4-minute thrill-ride through music history, featuring oddities, rarities and classics. This time, Work Songs with Harry Belafonte, Dolly Parton, Lee Dorsey and the Dwarf Chorus.

Whistle_2_small Weekly 4-minute thrill-ride through music history, featuring oddities, rarities and classics. This time, Work Songs with Harry Belafonte, Dolly Parton, Lee Dorsey and the Dwarf Chorus.

Record Bin Roulette - Product Placement

From John Kessler | 03:59

Weekly 4 minute binge of musical rarities, oddities and classics. This time, we buy into brand names in song with NIrvana, Paul Simon, Marilyn Monroe and Lady Gaga.

Teenspirit_small Weekly 4 minute binge of musical rarities, oddities and classics. This time, we buy into brand names in song with NIrvana, Paul Simon, Marilyn Monroe and Lady Gaga.

Record Bin Roulette - The 1 Percent

From John Kessler | 03:56

Weekly 4 minute dash through musical oddities, rarities and classics. This time we take a poke at the 1%, with Zero Mostel, The Beatles, Ethel Merman and Yosemite Sam.

Zappa_small Weekly 4 minute dash through musical oddities, rarities and classics. This time we take a poke at the 1%, with Zero Mostel, The Beatles, Ethel Merman and Yosemite Sam.

Record Bin Roulette - Sound Effects

From John Kessler | 03:47

4 minute weekly cruise through musical oddities, rarities and classics. This week, Sound Effects in Pop Music with Spike Jones, The Ronettes and Dolly Parton.

Cannon_small 4 minute weekly cruise through musical oddities, rarities and classics. This week, Sound Effects in Pop Music with Spike Jones, The Ronettes and Dolly Parton.

Record Bin Roulette-Money

From John Kessler | 03:53

Weekly musical oddities, rarities and surprises. Just in time for fund drive, it's songs about money with Liza Minelli, the O'Jays, Elvis and Monty Python.

Money_small Weekly musical oddities, rarities and surprises. Just in time for fund drive, it's songs about money with Liza Minelli, the O'Jays, Elvis and Monty Python.

Record Bin Roulette - Obsolete Technology

From John Kessler | 03:40

A musical excavation of rarities, classics and oddities, this week obsolete technologies like the Theremin and the cassette tape are enjoying a resurgence. We'll break the barriers of technology with Marvin Gaye, the Partridge Family and Zero Mostel.

Cassette_small A musical excavation of rarities, classics and oddities, this week obsolete technologies like the Theremin and the cassette tape are enjoying a resurgence. We'll break the barriers of technology with Marvin Gaye, the Partridge Family and Zero Mostel.

Record Bin Roulette - Lascivious Love Songs

From John Kessler | 03:55

4 minute weekly binge of musical rarities, oddities and classics, this week diving deep into the velvety cushion of love songs. From "Voulez Vouz Couchez" with Labelle to Katy Perry's "I Kissed A Girl", we offer love songs in their many splendored ways.

Mgaye_small 4 minute weekly binge of musical rarities, oddities and classics, this week diving deep into the velvety cushion of love songs. From "Voulez Vouz Couchez" with Labelle to Katy Perry's "I Kissed A Girl", we offer love songs in their many splendored ways.

Record Bin Roulette - Pop Music in Politics

From John Kessler | 03:50

This week, a look at the many ways politicians have used the power of pop music to enhance their images. With Tom Petty and Michelle Bachman, Sarah Palin and Heart, and Chrissie Hynde and Rush Limbaugh.

Sarahbarracuda_small This week, a look at the many ways politicians have used the power of pop music to enhance their images. With Tom Petty and Michelle Bachman, Sarah Palin and Heart, and Chrissie Hynde and Rush Limbaugh.

Record Bin Roulette-The Moon

From John Kessler | 03:54

This week we moon over some of our favorite lunar toons with Van Morrison, Marvin Gaye, Dean Martin and Julie London, among others.

Lunarsalute_small This week we moon over some of our favorite lunar toons with Van Morrison, Marvin Gaye, Dean Martin and Julie London, among others.

A Syrian refugee adjusts to life in Los Angeles

From Bending Borders | Part of the Tectonic Urbania series | 06:32

Shahan Sanosian, a student living in the U.S., fears for the safety of his parents back in Damascus.

142954-full_small

In Los Angeles, we continually cross unseen borders. That was the case for Allison Wolfe. She teaches English as a second language to young adults. Some of her students have fled faraway places in upheaval and ended up conjugating verbs with Wolfe. If you knew some of their stories, it might keep you up at night. Most students keep those stories to themselves. But sometimes they share. For Wolfe, one student stood out.


Talking Trump Is Funny

From Bending Borders | Part of the At Risk in the Age of Trump series | 05:10

Sara Schaefer does standup comedy in L.A. Taking her act on the road to college campuses--some in red, religious territory--has its own risks and comic rewards. Produced by Joanna Clay.

Sara_ny_show_small L.A. Comic Sara Schaefer is taking off across the U.S. to do stand-up at colleges. This time around, after the election of Donald Trump, she’s decided to tackle politics head on. Sean Spicer, misogyny, Trump voters – all of it is free game. As she travels, she figures out how to work in the more pointed material while keeping it fun for all. 

A Pastor Transforms a Church into a Sanctuary

From Bending Borders | Part of the At Risk in the Age of Trump series | 04:36

Once in plain view, many immigrants are missing from work sites, classrooms, and bus stops. But one pastor has vowed to do what he can to keep his immigrant parishioners safe, including make his church a refuge. Produced by Melanie Gonzalez.

Melanie-church_small Due to recent ICE raids and anti-Mexican rhetoric, many undocumented immigrants in Los Angeles fear leading their normal lives – driving, going to work, and going to the doctor all pose great risks. A Methodist pastor in the San Fernando Valley is offering his church as a sanctuary – literally.

Fearing Deportation, an Indonesian Dreamer Lives in the Shadows

From Bending Borders | Part of the At Risk in the Age of Trump series | 06:33

Alvin’s family left Indonesia for the U.S. to give their son more opportunity. Now that they are aging, it’s his turn to protect them...and he’s very worried. Produced by Stefanie De Leon Tzic.

Alvin_outside_car__small When Alvin’s family left Indonesia for the U.S., they created opportunity for their son. He’s now an accountant and supports his parents financially. His parents are here illegally, but Alvin is protected under President Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), a program that’s facing uncertainty – making Alvin wonder if his ‘dream’ could come to an end. 

A Muslim woman pulls off her hijab, and puts up her fists

From Bending Borders | Part of the At Risk in the Age of Trump series | 03:40

When attacks on Muslims and Mosques spiked, one young woman removed her headscarf but refused to be intimidated. Produced by Pasha Zolfaghari.

Marwa-asa-pasha_small Trump’s travel ban and the following news coverage of crimes at mosques and against Muslims in the U.S. made 22-year-old Marwa Abdelghani no longer comfortable being completely herself in public. She decided to remove her headscarf. Then, she took it a step further by signing up for a self-defense so that if she has to protect herself physically, she can.

A homeless artist struggles to practice her craft

From Bending Borders | Part of the Tectonic Urbania series | 07:18

Life as an artist is hard enough, but Juanita Pina carries the extra burden of being homeless in Los Angeles.

132233-full_small Virtually every skid row in America feels like someplace you don’t want to be. They are in gritty neighborhoods; people live under tarps and in tents and belongings are pushed into overstuffed bags. People look weary; older than they should be. But as Michael Ratcliffe found, sometimes you can find a very small hothouse where something beautiful grows, though it might be short-lived.

A Mexican-American family's divided immigration status

From Bending Borders | Part of the Between Homelands: Hope, Fear and Longing in America series | 04:16

Lupe Herrera has all the protections of United States citizenship, but none of that is guaranteed to her brother and parents. This legal crack in the family runs deep.

Lupe_small

Lupe Herrera is a 21st-century American teenager.  She laughs as she walks through the mall, cellphone firmly in hand, to check out new spring fashions. But tears well up when she’s asked about the divide in her close and devoted family. She and her younger sister were born in Los Angeles, after her older brother and parents made the treacherous journey north from Mexico. This legal crack in the family runs deep. Things most Americans wouldn’t think twice about dredge up raw emotions for the Herreras — things like piling into the car for a family road trip, or filling out financial aid forms for college.

A Nigerian Pop Star Struggles with her Musical Identity

From Bending Borders | Part of the Between Homelands: Hope, Fear and Longing in America series | 04:17

In her native Nigeria, Cynthia Dieyi is a pop singer who celebrates her culture through her music. But here in America, she's still unknown, and holding on to her "Nigerian sound" in face of Hollywood producers has proven difficult.

Cy-3-e1430769021748_small In her native Nigeria, Cynthia Dieyi is a pop singer who celebrates her culture through her music. But here in America, she's still unknown, and holding on to her "Nigerian sound" in face of Hollywood producers has proven difficult.

The Boundaries of Love in the Holy Land

From Bending Borders | Part of the Love is Complicated series | 12:18

It is rare for an Israeli and a Palestinian to fall in love. There are physical barriers, as Israelis can’t enter Palestinian areas, and Palestinians can’t enter Israeli areas, without special permits. There are also cultural barriers, of course. But a year ago, two 29-year-old men - one from Jerusalem, the other from a West Bank village - met one another and demonstrated that sometimes love can be found. Reporter Daniel Estrin brings us their story.

Boundariesoflove_small This production is part of the Global Story Project, with support from the Open Society Foundations. Presented by PRX, the Public Radio Exchange.

Love in the Time of Refugee Camps

From Bending Borders | Part of the Love is Complicated series | 06:29

Two Syrians, separated by war, go to great lengths for love.

Dsc_0092_small Merium and Ahmed grew up in the same village, but never took notice of each other until their families ended up in the same refugee camp in Turkey.  But even with fighting all around them, customs were observed.  They could not talk to each other. So, Meriem's young sister, like a kind of carrier pigeon, carried secret letters between Meriem and Ahmed. But war is the ultimate wild card. Before long, their families fled in separate directions and the two feared they would not see each other again.

Seattle: Sanctuary City

From Yuko Kodama | 05:38

There are over 75,000 legal permanent residents in the Seattle King County area, and many residents whose legal status could be in question. The city of Seattle is a Sanctuary City. KBCS Producer Jim Cantu spoke with Seattle City Council member Lorena Gonzalez about what that means.

Default-piece-image-2 There are over 75,000 legal permanent residents in the Seattle King County area, and many residents whose legal status could be in question. The city of Seattle is a Sanctuary City. KBCS Producer Jim Cantu spoke with Seattle City Council member Lorena Gonzalez about what that means.

A Very Brief History of the Microphone

From Open Source | Part of the Open Source Shorts and Podcasts series | 04:13

John Szwed, historian of sound and music, walks us through how Billie Holiday — along with Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra, Orson Welles, and Johnnie Ray — shaped the art of recording.

Screen_shot_2015-08-17_at_4 John Szwed, historian of sound and music, walks us through how Billie Holiday — along with Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra, Orson Welles, and Johnnie Ray — shaped the art of recording.

Black Prophetic Fire

From Open Source | Part of the Open Source Shorts and Podcasts series | 11:14

Cornel West calls for new fervor and love—the kind once heard in Coltrane or B.B. King—in a rising generation.

Screen_shot_2014-11-21_at_5 Cornel West calls for new fervor and love—the kind once heard in Coltrane or B.B. King—in a rising generation.

Jill Lepore: The Feminist and the Superhero

From Open Source | Part of the Open Source Shorts and Podcasts series | 13:34

Jill Lepore tells the secret history of Wonder Woman—and how the superhero mirrored the ups and downs of a feminist movement.

Screen_shot_2014-11-06_at_1 Jill Lepore tells the secret history of Wonder Woman—and how the superhero mirrored the ups and downs of a feminist movement.

The Most Dangerous Book

From Open Source | Part of the Open Source Shorts and Podcasts series | 11:54

What in James Joyce's Ulysses was so dangerously obscene? And why were the novel's greatest champions women? Chris Lydon talks with Kevin Birmingham about his new book.

James-joyce-and-nora-barn-008_small What in James Joyce's Ulysses was so dangerously obscene? And why were the novel's greatest champions women? Chris Lydon talks with Kevin Birmingham about his new book.

An Encounter with Bob Dylan

From This Land Press | 07:40

Jeff Martin, This Land’s fiction editor, tells us about the time he met Bob Dylan behind Cain’s Ballroom. Dylan’s fingernails left a lasting impression.

Bob_by_ben_salter_small_small Jeff Martin, This Land’s fiction editor, tells us about the time he met Bob Dylan behind Cain’s Ballroom. Dylan’s fingernails left a lasting impression.

Found Sound: Glossolalia

From This Land Press | 02:35

Glossolalia is an act of speech common in pentecostal and charismatic christian worship. But it’s non-linguistic speech, which means it’s not spoken with words. It’s a collection of human sounds that lack conventional meaning. Worshippers have reported that speaking glossolalia makes them feel closer to the realm of the holy spirit.

This segment is a collage of religious performances recorded in Oklahoma in the 1980s.

1142055966_d155b91b5f_b_small Glossolalia is an act of speech common in pentecostal and charismatic christian worship. But it’s non-linguistic speech, which means it’s not spoken with words. It’s a collection of human sounds that lack conventional meaning. Worshippers have reported that speaking glossolalia makes them feel closer to the realm of the holy spirit. This segment is a collage of religious performances recorded in Oklahoma in the 1980s.

A Tale of Two Choirs

From This Land Press | 08:42

This Land partnered with public radio show State of the Re:union to produce an hour long episode about Tulsa. The episode is called "Reconciliation Way," and it features stories about the 1921 Tulsa Race Riot and race relations today.

Screen_shot_2013-10-23_at_10

Producer Abby Wendle went in search of places in our community where people are doing the hard work of reconciliation. She found All Souls Unitarian Universalist, a church with a reputation of being open and accepting. Despite this, All Souls has been nearly all white for as long as anyone can remember. That changed five years ago, when their minister, Reverend Marlin Lavanhar, invited a black congregation to join the church.

It Started with a Crush

From This Land Press | 17:36

Ron Padgett is a poet, translator, and memoirist from Tulsa. He left for New York in 1960 to find inspiration from poets like Allen Ginsberg and Frank O’Hara. Last year Ron released Collected Poems, a tome collecting five decades of his work.

In this segment, Ron reads to us from his Collected Poems, then tells us where his first poem came from and what Allen Ginsberg used to do with tomatoes.

1068420494_78a1c871d8_b_small Ron Padgett is a poet, translator, and memoirist from Tulsa. He left for New York in 1960 to find inspiration from poets like Allen Ginsberg and Frank O’Hara. Last year Ron released Collected Poems, a tome collecting five decades of his work. In this segment, Ron reads to us from his Collected Poems, then tells us where his first poem came from and what Allen Ginsberg used to do with tomatoes.

Plane Wreck at Los Gatos: Finding Woody's Deportees

From This Land Press | 13:26

What do you call someone who breaks the law by crossing the border into the United States? An illegal? An alien? Jesús? In 1948, Woody Guthrie asked a similar question when a plane carrying four Americans and 28 Mexican nationals crashed in California. News coverage of the crash identified the Americans, while the Mexicans went unnamed.

Here, Abby Wendle tells the story of two men who fought to restore the identities of these “Deportees.”

Screen-shot-2014-03-27-at-10 What do you call someone who breaks the law by crossing the border into the United States? An illegal? An alien? Jesús? In 1948, Woody Guthrie asked a similar question when a plane carrying four Americans and 28 Mexican nationals crashed in California. News coverage of the crash identified the Americans, while the Mexicans went unnamed. Here, Abby Wendle tells the story of two men who fought to restore the identities of these “Deportees.”

The Queen and the King

From This Land Press | 03:48

Wanda Jackson talks about dating Elvis Presley and becoming the Queen of Rockabilly.

We_small Wanda Jackson talks about dating Elvis Presley and becoming the Queen of Rockabilly.

In the Negro Leagues

From This Land Press | 03:50

Porter Reed is one of two former Negro League baseball players still alive today in Oklahoma. Here, he talks about growing up in the sandlots of Muskogee, Oklahoma, and life as a black athlete in a segregated America.

1947_kansas_city_monarchs_small Porter Reed is one of two former Negro League baseball players still alive today in Oklahoma. Here, he talks about growing up in the sandlots of Muskogee, Oklahoma, and life as a black athlete in a segregated America.

Gorilla, Guerilla

From This Land Press | 07:27

An Okie travels to the African mountains to see Dian Fossey's gorillas, but forgets to turn off her flash.

Lacitadelle_jungle_small An Okie travels to the African mountains to see Dian Fossey's gorillas, but forgets to turn off her flash.

Holy Ghost All Over You

From This Land Press | 04:56

Bishop Carlton Pearson once led one of the largest megachurches in the country. But when he stopped preaching about hell, he lost it all. Now he preaches the gospel of tolerance to a mega Web congregation. Here, Pearson recalls the first time the Holy Ghost woke him up and made him dance.

Church_reallyboring_small Bishop Carlton Pearson once led one of the largest megachurches in the country. But when he stopped preaching about hell, he lost it all. Now he preaches the gospel of tolerance to a mega Web congregation. Here, Pearson recalls the first time the Holy Ghost woke him up and made him dance.

So Long Johnny Cale

From This Land Press | Part of the The Short So Long series | 05:16

JJ Cale was best known for writing hits for Eric Clapton and Waylon Jennings. Neil Young famously called him one of the two best electric guitar players ever. The other being Jimi Hendrix.
Cale was born in Oklahoma, and grew up in Tulsa. He died earlier this year at the age of 74. Abby Wendle spoke with his long time friend and part time harmonica player, Jimmy Markham, about Cale's natural swagger and his distaste for fame.

Jjcale_3_small JJ Cale was best known for writing hits for Eric Clapton and Waylon Jennings. Neil Young famously called him one of the two best electric guitar players ever. The other being Jimi Hendrix. Cale was born in Oklahoma, and grew up in Tulsa. He died earlier this year at the age of 74. Abby Wendle spoke with his long time friend and part time harmonica player, Jimmy Markham, about Cale's natural swagger and his distaste for fame.

Sister Helen Prejean Passes Through

From This Land Press | Part of the Just Passing Through series | 04:15

Sister Helen Prejean, of "Dead Man Walking" fame, discusses her spiritual awakening and the problems she has with how wealthier people look down on the working class.

Sr_prejean_speaks_to_tu_law_students_image_by_abby_wendle_small Sister Helen Prejean, of "Dead Man Walking" fame, discusses her spiritual awakening and the problems she has with how wealthier people look down on the working class.

Inside Oklahoma's Death Chamber

From This Land Press | Part of the The Sound of Our Land series | 04:48

Kelly Kurt discusses her experience covering executions in Oklahoma during her time as a reporter for the Associated Press. She worked for the wire during one of the busiest times in the Oklahoma death chamber - covering a total of 15 executions. We asked her to step behind death's yellow door one last time to witness the execution of Gary Welch. In this segment, she describes the execution process and reflects on her thoughts about the death penalty.

Deathchamber_small Kelly Kurt discusses her experience covering executions in Oklahoma during her time as a reporter for the Associated Press. She worked for the wire during one of the busiest times in the Oklahoma death chamber - covering a total of 15 executions. We asked her to step behind death's yellow door one last time to witness the execution of Gary Welch. In this segment, she describes the execution process and reflects on her thoughts about the death penalty.

Her Dad, Oral Roberts

From This Land Press | Part of the The Sound of Our Land series | 03:50

Roberta Roberts Potts, the daughter of the late televangelist and university founder, Oral Roberts, recently published a book about her father called "My Dad, Oral Roberts." In this segment, Potts shares memories of what it was like growing up with a famous father.

Roberta_and_oral_4_small Roberta Roberts Potts, the daughter of the late televangelist and university founder, Oral Roberts, recently published a book about her father called "My Dad, Oral Roberts." In this segment, Potts shares memories of what it was like growing up with a famous father.

Jazz on a Diamond-Needle Hi-Fi

From This Land Press | Part of the Poetry to the People series | 02:29

Deborah J. Hunter's poem "Jazz on a Diamond-Needle Hi-Fi" is performed live in Central Park by jazz musicians Tin Pan. Full poem below.

Tin_pan_performing_in_central_park_small Deborah J. Hunter's poem "Jazz on a Diamond-Needle Hi-Fi" is performed live in Central Park by Tin Pan. Full poem below.

"Jazz on a Diamond-Needle Hi-Fi"
by Deborah J. Hunter

Mama dropped the needle and my heart jumped.
It was fascinating, titillating,
be-boppin’, foot stompin’, traffic stoppin’, biscuit soppin’,
donut dippin’, daytrippin’, corn sippin’,
make me wanna shout,
cuss somebody out;
it was without a doubt,
the most sinfully rappin’, toe-tappin’,
thigh slappin’, happenin’ event.

It was the sun risin’, moon smilin’,
bees hummin’, lovers comin’,
mamas cryin’, souls dyin’,
life goin’ on
goin’ on
goin’ on.

It was Coltrane shatterin’ shackles,
Bird making the night air moan,
Dizzy gettin’ busy with the brass,
Brubeck redefining time,
Miles moving mountains meter by meter,
Ella bouncing lightning bolts off the sky.

It was jazz.
Ooh, jazz.
Yeah, jazz.
It was ss-ss-ss-ss-ss-ss

jazz.


Tulsa resident Deborah J. Hunter is an award-winning poet, spoken-word performance artist, and actor. Since 1997, she has facilitated poetry workshops and worked as a poet-in-residence in schools and community programs across the state. Her poetry has appeared in numerous publications, and her chapbooks include The Red Shoes and Other Poems from the Edge. 

Stringtown Prison Blues

From This Land Press | Part of the Poetry to the People series | 03:37

Former inmates and activist Mary McAnally read "Stringtown Prison Blues" and discuss their experiences with the penal system. Full transcript of poem included below.

Hand_around_bar_small

Activist Mary McAnally and former inmates read "Stringtown Prison Blues" and discuss their experiences with the penal system. Full transcript of poem included below:

This time is so hard to do here, I think I’ll go and pray.
I say this time is so hard to do here, I think I’ll just go and pray.
But someone just tol me gawd went on a holiday.

In Stringtown Prison the men number four-one-eight.
Yeah, I say in Stringtown Prison the men number four hundred, one-eight.
Cross this lonely country, 418 women wait.

Oh I’m so lonely Lord, I wish somebody would write.
I say I’m so lonely Lord, I wish somebody would just write.
Let the dog bark in the envelope and even that’ll be all right.

Well you and I are the only ones left baby, the only ones left alive.
Yeah baby, I say you and I are the only two goddam people left alive.
And now here you are telling me that I should take a dive.

This place is a cemetery, folks, each cell a cold tombstone.
I say this place is a cemetery, people, and each cell is a cold tombstone.
The spirit of decay just seeps deep into your bone.

My baby says she wrote me, and I know what she says is true.
Yeah, my baby says she wrote me, and I know what she says is true.
But somebody robbed the stagecoach carrying the mail and now what’m I gonna do?

Lord it was better when I had some wine to drink.
Yes Lord, it was a helluva lot better when I had some cheap wine to drink.
But now I ain’t got wine but only time to sit and think.

Yes Lord, I’m out of marijuana, out of uppers too.
I say I’m clean outta marijuana, and out of uppers too.
The guards are on a rampage, and boy am I sure blue.

Gonna leave this joint one day folks, and I ain’t lookin’ back.
Say I’m gonna leave this joint one day folks and ain’t ever lookin’ back.
Gonna catch the next thing rollin’ and hope it don’t jump the track.


From Warning: Hitch Hikers May Be Escaping Convicts, 1980, Moonlight Publications.

Mary McAnally

From This Land Press | Part of the The Sound of Our Land series | 04:06

Mary McAnally shares the story of how she organized the only Freedom Bus from Oklahoma during the Civil Rights Movement. She went with 40 University of Tulsa students and participated in sit-ins in Montgomery, Ala. She was arrested alongside Dr. Martin Luther King for her civil disobedience. As King told her, "You might get arrested, but you'll be in good company."

Sitting_in_3_small Mary McAnally shares the story of how she organized the only Freedom Bus from Oklahoma during the Civil Rights Movement. She went with 40 University of Tulsa students and participated in sit-ins in Montgomery, Ala. She was arrested alongside Dr. Martin Luther King for her civil disobedience. As King told her, "You might get arrested, but you'll be in good company."

Paula Poundstone

From This Land Press | Part of the Just Passing Through series | 02:36

Paula Poundstone has been criss-crossing the country performing as a stand-up comic since she was in her late teens. As a result of traveling so frequently, Poundstone remembers little about the cities she visits. Take a listen as Poundstone turns her unique brand of amnesia into -- what else -- a joke.

Paula_poundstone_small Paula Poundstone has been criss-crossing the country performing as a stand-up comic since she was in her late teens. As a result of traveling so frequently, Poundstone remembers little about the cities she visits. Take a listen as Poundstone turns her unique brand of amnesia into -- what else -- a joke.

History Under Oath

From This Land Press | Part of the The Sound of Our Land series | 04:34

In the early 1920s, the Ku Klux Klan had been so active in Tulsa, Oklahoma - doing everything from holding parades to organizing lynch mobs - that the Governor of the state declared martial law in August of 1923. A month later, the National Guard launched an investigation into the Klan's activities - over 700 people testified. Tate Brady, a prominent businessman in Tulsa at the time, was called to the stand to discuss his role in the Klan.

Tatebrady1_small In the early 1920s, the Ku Klux Klan had been so active in Tulsa, Oklahoma - doing everything from holding parades to organizing lynch mobs - that the Governor of the state declared martial law in August of 1923. A month later, the National Guard launched an investigation into the Klan's activities - over 700 people testified. Tate Brady, a prominent businessman in Tulsa at the time, was called to the stand to discuss his role in the Klan.

Plain Terror

From This Land Press | Part of the The Sound of Our Land series | 05:21

Oklahoma is considered a conservative state these days. But in the early 1900s, Oklahoma had an active leftist movement. Equally active was the Ku Klux Klan, organizing to squelch the growing power of the socialists and the working class. Here we have a story from Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, about her grandfather's involvement in the socialist party in Piedmont, Oklahoma and as a labor organizer for the Industrial Worker's of the World. Dunbar-Ortiz is a native Oklahoman, author of Red Dirt: Growing Up Okie and a retired history professor from California State University at Hayward.

Roxie__age_10_small Oklahoma is considered a conservative state these days. But in the early 1900s, Oklahoma had an active leftist movement. Equally active was the Ku Klux Klan, organizing to squelch the growing power of the socialists and the working class. Here we have a story from Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, about her grandfather's involvement in the socialist party in Piedmont, Oklahoma and as a labor organizer for the Industrial Worker's of the World. Dunbar-Ortiz is a native Oklahoman, author of Red Dirt: Growing Up Okie and a retired history professor from California State University at Hayward.

Honesty

From Carla Seidl | 03:19

A West African folktale in which dishonesty is revealed through a dance competition.

Playing
Honesty
From
Carla Seidl

Carla_in_farende_small "L'honnêteté," or "Honesty," is a West African folktale that treats themes of corruption and trust. It was told in French to narrator Carla Seidl by M. Bayamna in Kanté, Togo, in 2010. Seidl later translated it into English and interprets it here. 

Practicing Awareness

From Carla Seidl | 06:37

Students of the shakuhachi flute learn about music, listening, and presence in their daily lives.

Shakuhachi_small Phil Nyokai James teaches shakuhachi, a Japanese bamboo flute, in Portland, Maine. For Phil and his students, the lessons of the shakuhachi extend beyond the music to teach them about listening and presence in their daily lives. Produced while Seidl was a student at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies.

From a review by Hal Sokolow, January 29, 2008:

***** Contemplative, Inspiring, Thoughtful

Excellent opportunity to stop, not look, just listen. My favorite reflection brought up in this narrative is (paraphrased): Don't ask yourself "What should you do today, but how should you be today." This statement can be debated just like a chicken-or-the-egg question, however it's sufficient that its phrasing can stir thinking. It puts life in a somewhat different perspecitve and focus. What are our priorities? What should be our priorities? Where should we start? Overall, this submission's short collection of sounds, music and comments, effectively draws you in to the simple, yet often overlooked, portal to the world of sounds, environmental and self produced, that can take you to a different state of awareness, a peaceful meditative state where nothing needs to be done, and everything can be noticed, absorbed, and appreciated. Through a combination of soft meditative background music and insightful musings, the listener is rewarded with a light pathway towards heavier meanings.

Dolores Huerta

From KSLU | Part of the In Your Face Women series | 02:14

Dolores Huerta left her teaching job as a young woman to commit herself to working in the struggle for equal rights

Playing
Dolores Huerta
From
KSLU

Huerta_small Born to a labor union organizer and a woman highly active in her community, Dolores Huerta left her teaching job as a young woman to commit herself to working in the struggle for equal rights.

"I couldn't stand seeing kids come to class hungry and needing shoes," she said. "I thought I could do more by organizing farm workers than by trying to teach their hungry children."

Margaret Mead

From KSLU | Part of the In Your Face Women series | 02:36

Anthropologist Margaret Mead had a lot to do with the "sexual revolution" in the 1960's

Playing
Margaret Mead
From
KSLU

Mead_small Anthropologist Margaret Mead had a lot to do with the "sexual revolution" in the 1960's. For starters, her research in Samoa suggested that we'd all be a lot healthier and more rational, not to mention happier, if we just "went with the flow" as sexual beings rather than "saving ourselves for marriage," as we were being taught to do (but all too often, didn't).

Married three times herself and in at least two long-standing lesbian relationships, as well, Mead was suspect, at best, in elitist academic circles. Worse, however, was the fact that her work further challenged our perceptions and practices of gender and sexuality in Western societies. She convinced Dr. Benjamin Spock, for example, that it's better to breastfeed babies when they're hungry rather than according to a schedule. Countering the idea that men are "by nature" aggressive and women are "by nature" submissive, she published research demonstrating that there are cultures wherein both genders are aggressive, cultures whereinboth genders are not aggressive and even cultures wherein the women are practical and the men "primp." And she suggested that societal pressures cause adolescent angst and rebellion!

Needless to say, the criticisms came hard and fast -- once she was dead -- but they were ultimately nit-picking or debunked. And, in fact, U.S. President Jimmy Carter awarded her a Presidential Medal of Freedom a year after her death in 1978. The citation reads: "Intrepid, independent, plain spoken, fearless, [Margaret Mead] remains a model for the young and a teacher from whom all may learn."

Her instruction to those who listen to in-your-face women? "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has."

Maggie Kuhn

From KSLU | Part of the In Your Face Women series | 02:50

Maggie Kuhn left no stone unturned to leave the world in a better state than she found it. No topic was off limits. In fact, she even talked about sex among elders, suggesting that, since women live longer, they should connect with younger men or each other to meet their sexual needs.

Playing
Maggie Kuhn
From
KSLU

Kuhn_small When the Presbyterian Church forced Maggie Kuhn into "retirement" at the age of sixty-five, they didn't realize they were unleashing a dragon. After all, women of that age are supposed to be happysitting in their rockers on their respective porches, aren't they? It isn't as though Maggie didn't have enough to keep her busy.  A disabled mother and a mentally ill brother both required her attention.  But this was Maggie Kuhn, who had been teaching YWCA classes for women about organizing, social issues and even sexuality in the 1930's and 1940's.

Later, while teaching Presbyterian seminarians about the social aspect of the Gospel, Kuhn realized that the Church's retirement homes were places where the aged were treated like children, which she saw as a waste of talent and energy. So, when she was summarily relieved of her duties for being "over the hill," she immediately organized the Gray Panthers, a human rights organization and lobbying body that fights against ageism, a word nobody had ever heard before Kuhn burst on the scene.

Demonstrating that older Americans have interests and the willingness to take action on those interests, the Gray Panthers started by taking on the Vietnam War and never looked back.  Until her death in 1995, just short of her ninetieth birthday and twenty-five years after her so-called "retirement," Maggie Kuhn left no stone unturned to leave the world in a better state than she found it. No topic was off limits. In fact, she even talked about sex among elders, suggesting that, since women live longer, they should connect with younger men or each other to meet their sexual needs.

"Speak your mind, even if your voice shakes!" Kuhn was quoted as saying.  And speak her mind, she did. Whether pioneering housing cohabitation styles that put younger and older people together to the advantage of both or haranguing Congressional legislators about overspending on the military while pretending Social Security was a problem, Kuhn proved that age ain't nuthin' but a number.  And an in-your-face woman is ageless.

Lucy Parsons

From KSLU | Part of the In Your Face Women series | 02:33

Lucy Parsons fought tirelessly and effectively for the rights of political prisoners, people of color, workers, the homeless and women.

Playing
Lucy Parsons
From
KSLU

Parsons_lucy_small African-Americans, Native Americans and Mexicans can all claim credit for Lucy Gonzalez Parsons, who was born in Texas in 1853 -- which would mean she was probably a slave -- but whatever her heritage, she was most definitely an in-your-face woman. In fact, she proved it at the age of eighteen by marrying a White former Confederate soldier right before the two of them were run out of Texas.

In Chicago, where they settled, Albert and Lucy Parsons -- quickly identified as smart young energetic and wildly radical socialists and labor organizers -- were considered by the local police to be "more dangerous than a thousand rioters." They fought tirelessly and effectively for the rights of political prisoners, people of color, workers, the homeless and women until Albert was charged, convicted and executed for his part in organizing the famous Haymarket Uprising in 1886.

Losing the love of her life, Lucy didn't miss a hitch in continuing her work. She published Freedom: A Revolutionary Anarchist-Communist Monthly for a time.  She helped to organize the Industrial Workers of the World. And she eventually published an anarchist newspaper called The Liberator. Her fiery political speeches -- which she continued to deliver well into her eighties -- inspired a whole generation of activists, including writer Studs Terkel. "My conception of the strike of the future," she admonished her listeners, "is not to strike and go out and starve, but to strike and remain in and take possession of the necessary property of production!" 

Even today, in-your-face woman Lucy Parsons urges us to push the envelope: "The reinvention of daily life," she is quoted as saying, "means marching off the edge of our maps." Forward, march!

Lucretia Mott

From KSLU | Part of the In Your Face Women series | 02:32

Lucretia Mott advocated for world peace, racial justice, women's rights, and compassion for the poor and imprisoned.

Playing
Lucretia Mott
From
KSLU

Mott_2_small

When Lucretia Mott graduated from school and began her own teaching career, she was fine until she realized that men teachers were being paid three times as much as women teachers (such as herself). And then she wasn't fine anymore.

As a Quaker, she wasn't fine with slavery either. In fact, she refused to use cotton cloth, cane sugar or anything else produced by slave labor. And she helped to found the Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society with both Black and White members, an uncommon thing to do before the Civil War.

She was also known to speak before Black congregations and, again, this was far from common practice at a time when women speaking in public at all was deemed by many -- even many Quakers -- as against Bible teaching, let alone the audience was made up of both men and women (called "promiscuous" by those with the power to define). So Mott got as many attacks as she got support, but she kept on keepin' on anyway. On one occasion, when a crowd of nearly twenty thousand threatened violence against a group of women Mott had organized to discuss boycotting slave-produced goods, Mott (at barely five feet tall and weighing less than one hundred pounds) had each Black woman leave the hall and walk to safety arm in arm with a White woman.

When a General Anti-Slavery Convention was convened in London, England, in 1840, Mott and the other women delegates were forced to sit in a separate area, segregated from the men. Despite this fact, however, one reporter still called her "the Lioness of the Convention." She advocated for world peace, racial justice, women's rights, and compassion for the poor and imprisoned. And in 1848, when she met at Seneca Falls, New York, with other women to talk about women's rights, they signed a Declaration stating, "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men and women are created equal," and further demanding "all the rights and privileges which belong to [women] as citizens of the United States." One can only wonder what an in-your-face woman like Lucretia Mott would think of the fact that, more than one hundred fifty years later, we're still waiting.

Lillian Hellman

From KSLU | Part of the In Your Face Women series | 02:39

We might imagine that the plays Hellman wrote against fascism during World War II and her fundraising for anti-Nazis imprisoned in France would have made her look like a patriot, but instead it got her branded as a Communist and she was eventually blacklisted in Hollywood along with other people in the film industry who were considered suspect.

Playing
Lillian Hellman
From
KSLU

Hellman_small One of the best known biographies about Lillian Hellman is titled A Difficult Woman and an observer once called her "the kind of girl that can take the tops off bottles with her teeth." Born in New Orleans in the early 1900's, Hellman drank like a fish, swore like a sailor, and had sex when and with whom she chose. But that didn't begin to cover all the ways she was an in-your-face woman.

For starters, she was a prolific cutting-edge playwright and author.  Her first huge hit on Broadway, for example, was a play written in the 1930's about two women school teachers who were accused of being lesbians.  It was not an accident that the play addressed the devastating effects of social judgments on private lives.  It was a topic Hellman examined in her work all her life, including in her memoirs, considered some of the most engaging ever written.

In 1937, Hellman joined 88 other prominent public figures in signing a letter to progressives in the U.S. warning that it would be a fascist act to interfere with the Soviet Union's attempts to prevent a reactionary coup against its newly established socialist government.  The letter called for a "united front against fascism" and marked Hellman forever after as a political critic worthy of suspicion in her native land.  Still, she called her two years as a member of the U.S. Communist Party "very casual" in that she wasn't a burning political firebrand.  She just disagreed with almost everybody about almost anything -- except that people ought to be allowed to think for themselves.

We might imagine that the plays Hellman wrote against fascism during World War II and her fundraising for anti-Nazis imprisoned in France would have made her look like a patriot, but instead it got her branded as a Communist and she was eventually blacklisted in Hollywood along with other people in the film industry who were considered suspect.  Nevertheless, unrepentant and aware that she could wind up in prison for doing so, when she was called up to testify before the House Un-American Activities Committee, Hellman refused to talk about anyone other than herself and issued a press release which read, in part, "I cannot and will not cut my conscience to fit this year's fashions."  In-your-face women are famous for their snappy answers.

Lilian Ngoyi

From KSLU | Part of the In Your Face Women series | 02:18

Six countries and countless meetings with radical women later, Ngoyi boldly returned to South Africa, expecting to be arrested -- which she, needless to say, was. Her punishment started off with seventy-one days in solitary confinement and then continued for eleven years, during which she was constantly monitored, often held in what amounted to house arrest. But they couldn't shut her up or shut her down. Her powerful voice inspired all listeners to struggle on to victory.

Playing
Lilian Ngoyi
From
KSLU

Ngoyi_small In 1952, Lilian Ngoyi was "just" a poverty-stricken uneducated Black 41-year-old seamstress with two kids and an elderly mother to support when she suddenly discovered that she was an in-your-face woman. A year later, much to the horror of The Powers That Be, she was the President of a major women's political organization and helping to lead 20,000 women on a protest march against the apartheid government.

Recognizing the importance of international support of their struggle, but living under a power structure that restricted Black people's (and especially Black activists) every move, Ngoyi and another in-your-face woman decided that they must stow away on a boat under "White" names, convince a pilot to let them sit in segregated "White" seats on a plane, and talk their way into Great Britain to complete a Bible study course, knowing they might never see their families again.

Six countries and countless meetings with radical women later, Ngoyi boldly returned to South Africa, expecting to be arrested -- which she, needless to say, was. Her punishment started off with seventy-one days in solitary confinement and then continued for eleven years, during which she was constantly monitored, often held in what amounted to house arrest. But they couldn't shut her up or shut her down. Her powerful voice inspired all listeners to struggle on to victory.

Today, the square where the women gathered for that first historic march is called Lilian Ngoyi Square. And rightly so.

Gabrielle Petit

From KSLU | Part of the In Your Face Women series | 02:19

For nearly two years, using multiple false identities, Petit not only gathered and passed information, but assisted the underground resistance and distributed copies of the resistance newspaper, La libre Belgique, as well.

Playing
Gabrielle Petit
From
KSLU

Petit_small Having your mother die while you're just a child would be a hard thing to deal with. Having your working class father send you to a boarding school rather than let you stay with your one remaining parent would certainly add another emotional burden to your load. But Gabrielle Petit, who reached adulthood in Belgium just as Germany occupied her native land at the beginning of World War I, had already suffered both of these hardships by that time and was still standing.

So when her soldier fiance was wounded, Petit not only helped him to escape back into The Netherlands to rejoin his unit, but she reported everything she could remember to the British Intelligence authorities while she was there. Immediately impressed by her in-your-facedness, the Brits recruited her on the spot, gave her some training and ushered her back into Belgium to feed them additional and ongoing information about the German troops.
For nearly two years, using multiple false identities, Petit not only gathered and passed information, but assisted the underground resistance and distributed copies of the resistance newspaper, La libre Belgique, as well. Finally, in February of 1916 someone ratted her out to the Germans and she was arrested, tried and convicted of being a spy. Only twenty-two at the time, Petit divulged no information about her co-conspirators, even when offered clemency in exchange.
When the Germans preparing to execute Petit by firing squad offered her a blindfold, she refused, saying only, "Now you will see how a Belgian woman dies." Like an in-your-face woman, yes? Yes!

Fannie Lou Hamer

From KSLU | Part of the In Your Face Women series | 02:41

Older, overworked, frustrated and unwell, Hamer's famous line "I'm sick and tired of being sick and tired" appears on her tombstone. But she maintained until the day she died that "Nobody's free until everybody's free."

Playing
Fannie Lou Hamer
From
KSLU

Hamer_small Fannie Lou Hamer spent the 1950's training to be an activist and organizer in the all-Black community of Mound Bayou, Mississippi. The State of Mississippi paid her back by sterilizing her in 1961 without her knowledge or consent during a state-wide effort to reduce the number of poor, Black people there. So, when a call went out for African-Americans in Mississippi to register to vote, Hamer was the first in line. She later said, "I guess if I'd had any sense, I'd have been a little scared -- but what was the point...? The only thing they could do was kill me and it kinda seemed like they'd been trying to do that a little bit at a time since I could remember."

Soon, Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee organizer Bob Moses heard about "the lady that sings the hymns" and recruited her to begin traveling throughout the South encouraging others to risk their lives for justice. Jailed on false charges in Winona, Mississippi, Hamer was very nearly beaten to death before she was released. Nevertheless, she went on to organize some of the best known and most effective actions of the voter registration campaign, including "Freedom Summer" in 1964, during which many college students -- both Black and White -- descended on Mississippi to support the struggle in various ways.

That same summer, Hamer spoke to the nation on television when her "Freedom Democrats" challenged the all-White and anti-civil rights delegation to the Democratic National Convention as not representing all Mississippians. "Is this America," she asked boldly, "the land of the free and the home of the brave, where we have to sleep with our telephones off the hooks because our lives be threatened daily -- because we want to live as decent human beings?"

Older, overworked, frustrated and unwell, Hamer's famous line "I'm sick and tired of being sick and tired" appears on her tombstone. But she maintained until the day she died that "Nobody's free untileverybody's free." An in-your-face woman has no quit in her.

Emma Goldman

From KSLU | Part of the In Your Face Women series | 02:28

Goldman was repeatedly arrested and incarcerated during her life on charges of "inciting to riot" or disseminating birth control information, considered at the time to be obscene.

Playing
Emma Goldman
From
KSLU

Goldman_in_union_square_small Turned away from elementary school in Prusssia in the 1880's because she couldn't get a "certificate of good behavior," Emma Goldman frustrated, aggravated, argued with and fought back against authority in all its forms from a very early age until she died in the United States in 1940. Informed by her father that "All a Jewish daughter needs to know is how to prepare gefilte fish, cut noodles fine, and give the man plenty of children," Goldman not only ignored him, but worked to make a different world for women and all others who are oppressed.

Criticized because she had no problem with the idea of fighting violent authority structures with violent resistance, Goldman was repeatedly arrested and incarcerated during her life on charges of "inciting to riot" or disseminating birth control information, considered at the time to be obscene. Called "the high priestess of anarchy" and "the most dangerous woman in America" by her detractors, she was nonetheless called "a modern Joan of Arc" by the very popular New York World reporter Nellie Bly and was once met when she got out of prison by a crowd of nearly three thousand supporters.

In speech after speech before crowds of thousands wherever she went in the United States and Europe, Goldman railed against the U.S. prison system and prejudice against homosexuals, while advocating for access to birth control and a redistribution of wealth to include everyone. The subject of multiple plays, movies, books and articles, Emma Goldman resisted being pigeon-holed even by other anarchists. When some of them criticized her once for dancing because they felt that "agitators shouldn't dance," Goldman fired back that no Cause should expect her to be a nun and that, if it did, she didn't want it. In-your-face, in-your-face, in-your-face!

Susie King Taylor

From KSLU | Part of the In Your Face Women series | 02:24

Taylor made the cut as an in-your-face woman because she had the brass to go to secret schools as a child and then pass along what she learned as the best way ever to undermine the White Supremacist system in the U.S. in the mid-1800's

Playing
Susie King Taylor
From
KSLU

Taylor_susie_small When some Union troops found out Taylor could read, they got her to open a Freedman's school on St. Simons Island for a while in 1862. After marrying a Black soldier named King, she traveled with the Army for a few years and, at the end of the war, returned to teaching Black students to read even though her husband had died, leaving her a widow with an orphaned child.

Though she became a domestic servant to a wealthy family in Boston and married for the second time in her thirties, Taylor made the cut as an in-your-face woman because she had the brass to go to secret schools as a child and then pass along what she learned as the best way ever to undermine the White Supremacist system in the U.S. in the mid-1800's. Well, that and the fact that, in her autobiography, she touted her skill as a sharpshooter!

Marie-Jeanne Roland

From KSLU | Part of the In Your Face Women series | 02:45

When she was found guilty of treason and "political activism" (which wouldn't even have been considered a crime for a man), she was sentenced to die.

Playing
Marie-Jeanne Roland
From
KSLU

Roland_small Though a speech she gave in the Assembly bought she and her husband a momentary reprieve from their lack of favor, her unwillingness to go along to get along soon put them both in prison.

Though Roland was able to help her husband escape, she did not manage to free herself and so, when she was found guilty of treason and "political activism" (which wouldn't even have been considered a crime for a man), she was sentenced to die. Though she had once said she would "rather chew off her own fingers than become a writer," in the few months before she was carried to the guillotine, Roland wrote her memoirs. Published only two years later, they still stand as a historical record of how one in-your-face woman affected the politics of an entire nation at a time of crisis and change.

Mamie Till

From KSLU | Part of the In Your Face Women series | 02:30

Till used the broken body of her only child to give an entire nation a much needed object lesson.

Playing
Mamie Till
From
KSLU

Till-mobley_small Everyone she knew encouraged her to hide her son away in a closed casket, but Till wouldn't even consider it. "I wanted the world to see what they did to my baby," she later said. "Everybody needed to know what had happened to Emmett Till." So Till used the broken body of her only child to give an entire nation a much needed object lesson.

The day of the funeral, fifty-thousand people filed by the casket with Emmett's misshapen body inside it. And within a matter of months, in-your-face woman Rosa Parks had refused to move from her seat in a Montgomery, Alabama, segregated bus and Martin Luther King, Jr., had set a bus boycott in motion, two acts that are often seen as the beginning of the civil rights era of U.S. history.

Lucy Stone

From KSLU | Part of the In Your Face Women series | 02:54

Stone proceeded to live the life of a lecturer on abolition and women's rights.

Playing
Lucy Stone
From
KSLU

Stone_lucy_small After her graduation from Oberlin in 1847, Stone proceeded to live the life of a lecturer on abolition and women's rights, though her family had strongly counseled her not to do it and ultimately asked her toat least stay out of Massachusetts where they were. Needless to say, she spoke anyway and headed straight for Massachusetts to boot. She shortened her skirts and wore bloomer-style pants for the freedom. After a year of marriage, during which she struggled with the issue, she officially refused to take her husband's name. And for her belligerence (both public and private), she had ice water, rotten fruit, eggs and even Bibles thrown at her pretty much everywhere she went.

Ellen Johnson Sirleaf

From KSLU | Part of the In Your Face Women series | 02:41

Sirleaf has made education free and compulsory for all children in Liberia. She was responsible for the establishment of a Truth and Reconciliation Commission to unify the country after thirty years of civil war.

Sirleaf_2_small As President, Sirleaf has made education free and compulsory for all children in Liberia. She was responsible for the establishment of a Truth and Reconciliation Commission to unify the country after thirty years of civil war. She signed into law a Freedom of Information Act (the first like it in any African nation). And she has pulled Liberia out from under a massive load of debt and asked for legislation to make it illegal to put the country in such a position again.

In 2006, Forbes Magazine called her one of the most powerful women in the world. In 2010, Newsweek called her one of the ten best leaders of the world. And in 2011, she was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for her work related to the rights of women and their involvement in the peace process.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton

From KSLU | Part of the In Your Face Women series | 02:51

Stanton eventually claimed that the 14th and 15th Amendments, in fact -- because of the way they were worded -- gave women the right to vote

Stanton_small She wrote in her early thirties: "The general discontent I [feel] with woman's portion as wife, housekeeper, physician, and spiritual guide...and the wearied, anxious look of the majority of women impresse[s] me with a strong feeling that some active measures should be taken to remedy the wrongs of society in general, and of women in particular."

And the next thing anyone knew, the first women's rights convention was being held in Seneca Falls, the town where Stanton lived in upstate New York. Over the decades after the convention, Stanton eventually claimed that the 14th and 15th Amendments, in fact -- because of the way they were worded -- gave women the right to vote. So she and her principle partner in crime, in-your-face woman Susan B. Anthony made it a point to repeatedly go to the polls and demand to vote -- no matter how many times they were turned away.

Tawakkol Karman

From KSLU | Part of the In Your Face Women series | 02:48

In 2011, when Tawakkol Karman became the youngest winner of the Nobel Peace Prize ever.

Playing
Tawakkol Karman
From
KSLU

Karman_small In 2011, when Tawakkol Karman became the youngest winner of the Nobel Peace Prize ever, many people in the world might initially have assumed that she was the warm and fuzzy type.  Not so.  In fact, her fellow citizens in Yemen have called her the "Iron Woman" and "the Mother of the Revolution."  Karman was only 26 years old when she co-founded Women Journalists Without Chains, an organization dedicated to establishing freedom of speech in her country.  Death threats -- written and over the telephone -- immediately ensued, but Karman not only didn't flinch, she amped up her active and increasingly public protests to one per week by 2007.

Mukhtar Mai

From KSLU | Part of the In Your Face Women series | 02:16

Mai threw a Pakistani tribal council and the men who raped her an unexpected curve. Rather than kill herself, she sued the rapists in a court of law.

Playing
Mukhtar Mai
From
KSLU

Mai_small In June of 2002, Mukhtar Mai was ordered by a Pakistani tribal council to be gang-raped as a punishment to her family for offending another family. She was expected to commit suicide afterward because, in her society, losing her virginity outside of marriage is thought to destroy a woman's worth. But Mai threw the council and the men who raped her an unexpected curve. Rather than kill herself, she sued the rapists in a court of law.

Mary Harris “Mother” Jones

From KSLU | Part of the In Your Face Women series | 02:14

What does a woman do when her husband and four children all die of yellow fever and her dressmaking workshop burns to the ground? She becomes an in-your-face labor union organizer!

Jones__mother__small So when all other doors suddenly seemed to close, instead of sitting in a corner feeling sorry for herself,  Jones simply joined an early predecessor of the International Workers of the World, involving herself later with the United Mine Workers and the Socialist Party of America.  Hollering "You don't need the vote to raise hell!" and using humor, profanity, name-calling and wit, Jones caused so much upheaval for the corporate Powers-That-Be that she was called at one point "the most dangerous woman in America." 

Jane Goodwin Austin

From KSLU | Part of the In Your Face Women series | 01:46

Jane Goodwin Austin became known as “Calamity Jane,” with the Mexican government placing a $1000 bounty on her head.

Playing
Jane Goodwin Austin
From
KSLU

Austin_small Expelled from Miss Finch’s Finishing School in New York in the early 1800's for being “an incorrigible tomboy,” Jane Goodwin Austin returned to her parents’ house, had what was reputed to be a wild affair with her cousin (one of the founders of the republic of Texas), gave birth to a baby with no acknowledged father, and spent a decade establishing herself as a popular novelist of the day.

Then, during the war for Texan independence from Mexico, Austin became such a fierce guerrilla leader and adept sharpshooter that she became known as “Calamity Jane,” with the Mexican government placing a $1000 bounty on her head. 

Zora Neale Hurston

From KSLU | Part of the In Your Face Women series | 02:21

Zora was one of the shining lights of the Harlem Renaissance as a writer of novels, short stories, essays, articles, plays, folklore collections, and even an autobiography.

Playing
Zora Neale Hurston
From
KSLU

Hurston_small One night in 1925, at a literary awards dinner, Zora Neale Hurston (who had herself won fourof the awards that night) entered the ballroom, threw a long, brightly colored scarf over her shoulder and around her neck with a flourish and bellowed, "Coloooor Struuuuck!" (the name of one of her plays).  And that's just the way this in-your-face woman rolled.