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Playlist: Music

Compiled By: Roland Foster

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Music

Episode #171 - Sun Records R&B Story Pt. 1

From Matt "The Cat" Baldassarri | Part of the Juke In The Back With Matt The Cat series | 59:01

This week's "Juke In The Back" spotlights the most influential and important record label of all-time, Sun Records. In part 1 of this 2 part series, you'll hear nearly all of Sun's legendary rhythm & blues releases during 1952 and '53 as Matt The Cat gives you the story behind the story on Sun's R&B sides.

Jitbtitlemedium_small Sam Phillips of Sun Records Sun Records R&B Story Pt. 1

This week, the "Juke In The Back" salutes the most influential and important record label of all-time, Sun Records. Sam Phillips started the legendary label in Memphis, TN in March, 1952 after successfully recording the debut sides from B.B. King, Ike Turner, Phineas Newborn and Howlin' Wolf and selling the masters to RPM Records in LA and Chess Records in Chicago. This is part one of a two part feature, leading up to Phillips' groundbreaking, pop culture shifting discovery of Elvis Presley in July, 1954. Matt The Cat examines nearly every rhythm & blues side that Sun Released during 1952 and '53 on this in-depth look into one of America's most treasured music catalogs. That little yellow label from Memphis is in the spotlight all week on the "Juke In The Back," America's showcase for 1940s and '50s Rhythm & Blues.

Episode #172 - Sun Records R&B Story Pt. 2

From Matt "The Cat" Baldassarri | Part of the Juke In The Back With Matt The Cat series | 59:00

On Part 2 of the "Juke In The Back"'s tribute to Sun Records' early R&B releases, Matt The Cat features Elvis' first, historic professional recording as well as other great records from Little Milton, James Cotton and many more.

Jitbtitlemedium_small Sam Phillips & Elvis Presley at Sun Records Sun Records R&B Story Pt. 2

On Part 2 of "Juke In The Back"'s 2 part series on Sun Records' early R&B releases, Matt The Cat spotlights 1954 and '55. This was the most important year and a half in Sun's history. In July, 1954, a young former truck driver named Elvis Presley entered 706 Union Avenue in Memphis and laid down the a song that would lead to the rock n' roll explosion of the mid-1950s. Sun founder, the late Sam Phillips recalls that historic recording as Matt The Cat spins classic Sun R&B from the likes of Billy "The Kid" Emerson, Little Milton, James Cotton and Roscoe Gordon. This is the thrilling conclusion to the "Juke In The Back" tribute to the most important and influential label in the history of rock n' roll.

Episode #386 - Ray Charles, Pt. 1 - 1948-52

From Matt "The Cat" Baldassarri | Part of the Juke In The Back With Matt The Cat series | 59:01

This week, the "Juke In The Back" begins a four part feature on the early musical career of the great, Ray Charles, which will cover 1948-58. Part 1 focuses on Ray's first recordings from 1948-52 for Jack Lauderdale's Down Beat and Swing Time labels. These are the pivotal years before he joined Atlantic Records.

Jitbtitlemedium_small Ray CharlesRay Charles, Pt. 1: 1948-1952

This week, the "Juke In The Back" begins a four part feature on the early musical career of the great, Ray Charles, which will cover 1948-58. Born in poverty during The Great Depression, the young Ray Charles Robinson overcame the tragedy of losing his younger brother at age 5, going completely blind at age 7 and losing his mother at age 15. These experiences forced Ray to step up his musical game, cut out on his own and make something of himself. He moved to Seattle in 1947 and began recording with Jack Lauderdale's LA-based Down Beat Records in 1949. His first single hit #2 on the national R&B charts. By 1951, he was back on the charts with 2 more hit singles for Swing Time Records. This week, Matt The Cat takes a look at Ray's early career BEFORE he hooked up with Ahmet Ertegun and Atlantic Records in '52. Next week, we'll look at Ray's early Atlantic recordings and eventually, we'll take Ray Charles' story up to 1958. Some great early sides by Brotha Ray are jumpin' out of this week's "Juke In The Back." 

Episode #381 - Sam Cooke

From Matt "The Cat" Baldassarri | Part of the Juke In The Back With Matt The Cat series | 59:01

Few African Americans accomplished so much (songwriter, revered singer, entrepreneur) during the 1950s as the legendary Sam Cooke. This week, Matt The Cat, along with author Peter Guralnick look at the life and early music of Sam Cooke, from his gospel roots to his R&B/pop breakthrough.

Jitbtitlemedium_small Sam CookeSam Cooke

The "Juke In The Back" features a full hour of Sam Cooke, one of the distinctive and expressive voices ever pressed in wax. Cooke's early period singing gospel with the renowned Soul Stirrers is often cited, but hardly ever featured. Matt The Cat focuses on Sam Cooke's early days from 1951 to 1957, begriming with his recordings with the Soul Stirrers up through his R&B and pop breakthrough of 1957. Matt is joined by author Peter Guralnick, who wrote the definitive biography on Cooke called "Dream Boogie: The Triumph Of Sam Cooke," filling in the background on one of the 20th Century's most revered singers. Cooke was also a noted songwriter, producer and entrepreneur, starting his own SAR Records in the late 1950s. Few African-American artists went further during the 1950s while jamming the juke boxes with tremendous gospel, R&B and pop hits. Hear the man who invented soul, this week on the "Juke In The Back."

Episode #380 - Elvis' R&B Influences

From Matt "The Cat" Baldassarri | Part of the Juke In The Back With Matt The Cat series | 59:01

Elvis Presley's early music was a blend of Hillbilly, Country, Gospel and R&B. This week's "Juke In The Back" explored the enormous debt Elvis owed to his Rhythm & Blues idols and in turn, the debt the music owes to Elvis.

Jitbtitlemedium_small Early ElvisElvis' Rhythm & Blues Influences

40 years ago this week, we lost the "King Of Rock n' Roll. Much has been written about Elvis’ enormous impact and popularity over the years, but it’s almost impossible to overstate the cultural shift that took place as he rose to fame in 1956. Elvis was a musical sponge. He absorbed all the music that moved him and those around him, from Country and Hillbilly to Gospel, Pop, R&B and Blues. This week’s “Juke In The Back” focuses solely on the rhythm & blues that motivated Elvis’ early career. During the end of his first session with Sam Phillips, Elvis cut into an inspired rendition of a semi-forgotten Arthur Crudup gem and rock n’ roll was literally born. From the New Orleans R&B of Smiley Lewis, to the jump blues of Wynonie Harris, Elvis dug it all and made each song uniquely his own. He wasn’t copying his R&B idols, he was merely using their material as a springboard for his own blend of the White and the Black. Sam Phillips was right when he said that it would take a White cat with an African-American feel to propel this exciting R&B music into the mainstream and lucky for us, he found that in Elvis Presley. Matt The Cat presents many surprises in this week’s “Juke In The Back,” dedicated to Elvis’ strongest musical influence: Rhythm & Blues.

Episode #373 - Summertime R&B: 4th of July, Food & Baseball Songs

From Matt "The Cat" Baldassarri | Part of the Juke In The Back With Matt The Cat series | 59:01

The Juke In The Back jumps into summer by spotlighting THE summertime holiday, the 4th of July. We're diggin' the 4th in song, ranging from songs about summertime to songs about summertime foods. We'll also focus on America's pastime with R&B songs about Baseball. So grab some nickels, suntan lotion, a hot dog and meet us at the ballpark, where the Juke In The Back will be jumpin'!

Jitbtitlemedium_small Summertime R&BSummertime R&B: 4th of July, Food & Baseball Songs

The Juke In The Back jumps into summer by spotlighting THE summertime holiday, the 4th of July. We're diggin' the 4th in song, ranging from songs about summertime by Sam Cooke, Chuck Berry and The Basin Street Boys to songs about summertime foods from Chris Powell and John Brim. We'll also focus on America's pastime with R&B songs about Baseball, honoring some of the top players who crossed over from the Negro Leagues into the Major Leagues. Records from Buddy Johnson, Brownie McGhee and Jack Williams are highlights as we cruise America's great highways jiving to the true songs of Summer. Grab some nickels, suntan lotion, a hot dog and meet us at the ballpark, where the Juke In The Back will be jumpin'! 

Episode #369 - Unsung Ladies of R&B

From Matt "The Cat" Baldassarri | Part of the Juke In The Back With Matt The Cat series | 59:01

This week, the "Juke In The Back" solutes the Unsung Ladies of R&B! We'll dig deep into a stack of shellac from some women you know, like Varetta Dillard, Ann Cole and The Cookies, as well as from some that you may not know, such as Gwen Johnson and Bonita Cole.

Jitbtitlemedium_small Unsung Ladies Of R&BUnsung Ladies of R&B

This week, the "Juke In The Back" solutes the Unsung Ladies of R&B! We'll dig deep into a stack of shellac from some women you know, like Varetta Dillard, Ann Cole and The Cookies, as well as from some that you may not know, such as Gwen Johnson and Bonita Cole. Matt The Cat will also feature an audition tape by the seldom heard Olive Brown, which was never issued at the time. None of the chanteuses on this week's program have catalogs deep enough to be main features, so we've gathered them together so they can shine on their own program. Pick up on what these ladies are puttin' down on this week's "Juke In The Back" and the "soul that came before Rock n' Roll." 

Episode #367 - Etta James

From Matt "The Cat" Baldassarri | Part of the Juke In The Back With Matt The Cat series | 59:00

Etta James was one of the grittiest and most influential R&B singer of all-time. This week, Matt The Cat focuses on Etta's early records from 1954-1960 on the "Juke In The Back."

Jitbtitlemedium_small Etta JamesEtta James

 

Producer Jerry Wexler called Etta James, "The greatest of all modern blues singers."  That's great praise coming from a guy who worked with the greatest of the greats for 50 years.  Etta had an amazing talent for mixing a bit of tenderness and heartbreak into her gritty, tough and soulful voice.  She had a style all her own and she played by her own rules.  Her success on record was equally matched by her personal failures off-mic, dealing with drug addiction, bad relationships and financial problems.  On this week's "Juke In The Back," Matt The Cat looks at how this incredible legend got started, focusing on Etta's first recordings from 1954 to her great rise in 1960.  Through these records, you'll hear that even in her early days, Etta's music had great depth and variety.  We honor the late, great Etta James, this week on the "Juke In The Back."

Episode #351 - 1947: Jukebox Rhythm Review, Pt. 1

From Matt "The Cat" Baldassarri | Part of the Juke In The Back With Matt The Cat series | 59:01

This week, we travel back 70 years with our ol' Rockola Jukebox to spotlight the biggest Rhythm & Blues jukebox hits from 1947. In part one, we'll focus on the biggest jukebox jivers from the first half of 1947, including the first charting hits for T-Bone Walker, Hadda Brooks and the original Sonny Boy Williamson.

Jitbtitlemedium_small 1947: Jukebox Rhythm Review1947: Jukebox Rhythm Review

This week, we travel back 70 years with our ol' Rockola Jukebox to spotlight the biggest Rhythm & Blues jukebox hits from 1947. In part one, we'll focus on the biggest jukebox jivers from the first half of 1947, including the first charting hits for T-Bone Walker, Hadda Brooks and the original Sonny Boy Williamson. 1947 was dominated by Louis Jordan, who held the top spot for 40 weeks with 4 #1 records. We'll hear two of those on this week's program along with a B side that went to #2. 1947 was also the year of the "Open The Door Richard!" fad, which saw 5 versions hit the R&B top 5, not to mention a few that also topped the Pop Chart. So grab a handful of nickels and dig the popular platters from the first half of 1947 with Matt The Cat and the "Juke In The Back." 

Episode #352 - 1947: Jukebox Rhythm Review, Pt. 2

From Matt "The Cat" Baldassarri | Part of the Juke In The Back With Matt The Cat series | 59:00

This week, we travel back 70 years with our ol' Rockola Jukebox to spotlight the biggest Rhythm & Blues jukebox hits from 1947. In part two of two, we'll focus on the biggest jukebox jivers from the second half of 1947, including the only charting singles for Bill Johnson & His Musical Notes and The Floyd Hunt Quartette. R&B stalwarts Roy Milton, Johnny Moore's Three Blazers, Joe Liggins & His Honeydrippers and The Ink Spots continue to score massive jukebox hits. So grab a handful of nickels and dig the popular platters from the second half of 1947 with Matt The Cat and the "Juke In The Back."

Jitbtitlemedium_small 1947: Jukebox Rhythm Review1947: Jukebox Rhythm Review, Pt. 2

This week, we travel back 70 years with our ol' Rockola Jukebox to spotlight the biggest Rhythm & Blues jukebox hits from 1947. In part two of two, we'll focus on the biggest jukebox jivers from the second half of 1947, including the only charting singles for Bill Johnson & His Musical Notes and The Floyd Hunt Quartette. Louis Jordan continues to dominate the year with two more #1 platters this week and R&B stalwarts Roy Milton, Johnny Moore's Three Blazers, Joe Liggins & His Honeydrippers and The Ink Spots continue to score massive jukebox hits. 1947 also saw debut records for Amos Milburn and Clarence "Gatemouth" Brown. So grab a handful of nickels and dig the popular platters from the second half of 1947 with Matt The Cat and the "Juke In The Back." 

Episode #342 - Lowell Fulson

From Matt "The Cat" Baldassarri | Part of the Juke In The Back With Matt The Cat series | 59:01

The "Juke In The Back" spotlights a true blues legend, Lowell Fulson. From his 1948 breakthrough, "Three O'Clock Blues" to his 1954 legendary smash "Reconsider Baby," Matt The Cat will present the story behind the story on the great Oklahoma bluesman, who became one of the guiding lights of West Coast Blues.

Jitbtitlemedium_small

Lowell FulsonLowell Fulson 

This week, the "Juke In The Back" spotlights Lowell Fulson, one of the blues' most versatile and vastly underrated talents. In the late 1940s, Fulson stormed the charts with his first hit "Three O'Clock Blues," a song that B.B. King would take to the top of the charts in 1951. Fulson started the 1950s with a bang, scoring six charted hits for Swingtime Records in 1950 alone. By '54, he was on Checker Records out of Chicago with a song that would be covered by Elvis in 1960, "Reconsider Baby." Fulson wrote many of his own songs and was a major inspiration to both B.B. King and Ray Charles, who played in his touring band in 1950. Get the story behind the story on a true rhythm & blues legend, it's Lowell Folsun, this week on the "Juke In The Back" with Matt The Cat.

Episode #341 - R&B Novelty Songs

From Matt "The Cat" Baldassarri | Part of the Juke In The Back With Matt The Cat series | 59:01

The "Juke In The Back" is jumpin' this week with a salute to the lighter side of classic 1950s rhythm and blues. These “novelty” R&B tunes come from jump blues masters from Louis Jordan to Bull Moose Jackson and all the side-splittin' jive in-between.

Jitbtitlemedium_small R&B Novelty SongsR&B Novelty Songs 

The juke is jumpin' this week with a salute to the lighter side of classic 1950s rhythm and blues.  These “novelty” R&B tunes come from jump blues masters from Louis Jordan to Bull Moose Jackson and all the side-splittin' jive in-between.  You'll hear all about Richard Berry, Wynonie Harris, Andre Williams and Dusty Fletcher getting in trouble with the law as well as a wacky song about crazy food.  Join Matt The Cat for a hilarious look at the “soul that came before rock n' roll” on “Juke In The Back.”

Episode #328 - Elvis' Rhythm & Blues Influences

From Matt "The Cat" Baldassarri | Part of the Juke In The Back With Matt The Cat series | 59:01

Elvis Presley's early music was a blend of Hillbilly, Country, Gospel and R&B. This week's "Juke In The Back" explored the enormous debt Elvis owed to his Rhythm & Blues idols and in turn, the debt the music owes to Elvis.

Jitbtitlemedium_small Elvis' R&B Influences - Juke In The BackElvis' Rhythm & Blues Influences

39 years ago this week, we lost the "King Of Rock n' Roll. Much has been written about Elvis’ enormous impact and popularity over the years, but it’s almost impossible to overstate the cultural shift that took place as he rose to fame in 1956. Elvis was a musical sponge. He absorbed all the music that moved him and those around him, from Country and Hillbilly to Gospel, Pop, R&B and Blues. This week’s “Juke In The Back” focuses solely on the rhythm & blues that motivated Elvis’ early career. During the end of his first session with Sam Phillips, Elvis cut into an inspired rendition of a semi-forgotten Arthur Crudup gem and rock n’ roll was literally born. From the New Orleans R&B of Smiley Lewis, to the jump blues of Wynonie Harris, Elvis dug it all and made each song uniquely his own. He wasn’t copying his R&B idols, he was merely using their material as a springboard for his own blend of the White and the Black. Sam Phillips was right when he said that it would take a White cat with an African-American feel to propel this exciting R&B music into the mainstream and lucky for us, he found that in Elvis Presley. Matt The Cat presents many surprises in this week’s “Juke In The Back,” dedicated to Elvis’ strongest musical influence: Rhythm & Blues.

Episode #326 - T-Bone Walker

From Matt "The Cat" Baldassarri | Part of the Juke In The Back With Matt The Cat series | 59:00

Drop a nickel in the ol' Rockola Juke to hear one of the best selling and most influential bluesmen and guitarists of all-time, T-Bone Walker. This week's show looks at how T-Bone's immense guitar talent developed from his first recordings in the early 1940s to his breakthrough after WWII with the now classic, "Call It Stormy Monday (But Tuesday's Just As Bad)" and beyond.

Jitbtitlemedium_small T-Bone WalkerT-Bone Walker

Drop a nickel in the ol' Rockola Juke to hear one of the best selling and most influential bluesmen and guitarists of all-time, T-Bone Walker. This week's show looks at how T-Bone's immense guitar talent developed from his first recordings in the early 1940s to his breakthrough after WWII with the now classic, "Call It Stormy Monday (But Tuesday's Just As Bad)" for Black & White Records. We'll also get a taste of T-Bone's work for the Cornet, Imperial and Atlantic labels. B. B. King, Ray Charles and Chuck Berry have all cited T-Bone Walker as a heavy influence. Find out why on this week's "Juke In The Back" with Matt The Cat.

Episode #324 - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton

From Matt "The Cat" Baldassarri | Part of the Juke In The Back With Matt The Cat series | 59:00

Willie Mae Thornton was a trailblazer, who in making her own rules paved the way for other groundbreaking female artists like Janis Joplin and Madonna. Known as "Big Mama," Thornton scored her only hit record in early 1953 when "Hound Dog" topped the national Rhythm & Blues Charts, but her career spanned from 1950 to well into the 1970s. This week, Matt The Cat dusts off Big Mama Thornton's best sides from Peacock Records and even digs up her first recordings for the E&W label under the group name, The Harlem Stars (1950).

Jitbtitlemedium_small Big Mama ThorntonWillie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton

Willie Mae Thornton was a trailblazer, who in making her own rules paved the way for other groundbreaking female artists like Janis Joplin and Madonna. Known as "Big Mama," Thornton scored her only hit record in early 1953 when "Hound Dog" topped the national Rhythm & Blues Charts, but her career spanned from 1950 to well into the 1970s. Elvis not only recorded "Hound Dog," which was written by the young, white songwriting duo of Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, but he also took much of his swagger from Thornton, who was known to be blatantly tough and sexual on stage. Besides "Hound Dog," her other signature song, "They Call Me Big Mama," ranks among her best material, along with "Rock A Bye Baby," "Mischievous Boogie" and "My Man Called Me." Big Mama is also uncredited on a duet with friend Johnny Ace called "Yes, Baby" from 1953. She wrote many of her own songs, but like many artists of her day, did not own the publishing rights, so when Joplin recorded her "Ball and Chain," Big Mama Thornton didn't get any royalties from it. This week, Matt The Cat dusts off Big Mama Thornton's best sides from Peacock Records and even digs up her first recordings for the E&W label under the group name, The Harlem Stars (1950). 

It’s Jazz, Charlie Brown: The Vince Guaraldi Story

From WFIU | 59:01

An hourlong program featuring the music and life of Peanuts composer and jazz pianist Vince Guaraldi. A great special around the holiday season...or anytime!

Guaraldi_peanuts_small

Vince Guaraldi wrote some of the most popular music ever composed by a jazz artist-drawing on boogie-woogie, blues, bebop, Latin jazz, and bossa nova to create a magical and evocative sound heard by millions of listeners around the world through the Peanuts TV specials, beginning with "A Charlie Brown Christmas" in 1965.  Though the commercial success of those specials gave Guaraldi economic security, he continued to play jazz gigs at small clubs till the end of his life.  Intense, exploratory and devoted to his craft, he left a profoundly jazzy stamp on American popular culture.   

"It's Jazz, Charlie Brown:  the Vince Guaraldi Story" includes interviews with Guaraldi's son David, Peanuts producer Lee Mendelson, jazz critic Doug Ramsey, Guaraldi friend and sideman Eddie Duran, and jazz pianist Luke Gillespie, who all give insight into Guaraldi as a musician and a man.  We'll hear the wide expanse of the pianist's career on record, ranging from early appearances with Woody Herman and Cal Tjader and 1960s bossa-nova collaborations with guitarist Bola Sete to excerpts from Guaraldi's sacred concert and late-period fusion excursion, as well as his early piano-trio sides, several of his most popular Peanuts recordings, and his 1962 pre-Peanuts hit "Cast Your Fate to the Wind."   

The R&B Chronicles - Aretha Franklin

From WHRV | Part of the The R&B Chronicles series | 59:47

Exploration of R&B Music

Aretha_franklin_small Perhaps more than any other genre of popular American music culture, soul music is the result of the combination and merging of previous styles and sub-styles in the 50's and 60's. At it's inception soul music combined the African American concepts of gospel and blues sensibilities in creating a passionate, soulful and musical presentation of the African American spirit. Rhythm and Blues is itself a combination of blues and jazz and developed in the 40's as small groups of predominately African American musicians built upon the blues tradition which morphed itself into soul music coming into the 50's. "The R&B Chronicles" is a weekly musical biography that will focus on classic R&B and soul music and feature many of the great artists and groups.... such as Otis Redding, James Brown, Aretha Franklin, The Temptations, Stevie Wonder, Ray Charles, Earth, Wind and Fire and many more. "The R&B Chronicles" airs Friday evenings at 7pm on 89.5 WHRV-FM. Hosted and produced by Jae Sinnett.

The Summer of Love

From Garrett Stack | Part of the American Jukebox ® series | 01:56:55

1967 is called The Summer of Love. The end of business as usual as young people rebelled against the status quo and converged on San Francisco.

Summer_of_love_graphic_small American Jukebox® 247. The Summer of Love: During May, June, July and August of 1967 a cultural revolution came to a head as as many as 100,000 young people made their way to San Francisco's Haight-Ashbury district to commune in an atmosphere of love, peace, flowers, music, art, and for some, illegal drugs.The shaking off of traditions in dress, politics, business, war, and getting high beyond alcohol were at the heart of that convergence in San Francsco. But other cities like New York and London experienced their own summer of love as well. However, for millions of college students, this writer included, they were busy working their summer jobs before heading back to school in the fall and didn't have the luxury or money to join the movement. Nonetheless, the music was everywhere and it connected us.
The Summer of Love was also known as The Long Hot Summer of 1967. It was marred by race riots in dozens of major US cities as racial tensions exploded and cities were literally on fire. Detroit and Newark were considered to be the worst, but other cities were not immune to the tension and ultimate destruction. In all, it is said that 159 significant racially motivated disturbances were recorded that summer.
On this edition of American Jukebox, the music that was the soundtrack of the summer of 1967 is featured. A partial list includes the summer of '67 hits for Aretha Franklin, The Doors, The Four Seasons, Donovan, Wilson Pickett, Simon & Garfunkle, Stevie Wonder, The Supremes, The Beatles, The "Young" Rascals (still "young"), Peter, Paul & Mary and so many others. Bursting on the scene with major statements were Janis Ian, Jefferson Airplane and the anthem of the summer, Scott McKenzie's San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers In Your Hair).
Join the movement and go back to the Summer of Love on American Jukebox.


The Byrds (part 2): Farther Along

From Joyride Media | Part of the The Byrds: There is a Season / Farther Along series | 59:05

The Second of two one-hour documentaries on The Byrds, covering 1968 to 1972: the groundbreaking country-rock years.

Unissued_small The second of two one-hour documentaries on The Byrds, the continuously groundbreaking band who bridged the gaps between The Beatles, Bob Dylan, Pete Seeger, the Beach Boys, the Los Angeles psychedelic underground and classic country. Each hour is hosted by singer-songwriter Laura Cantrell, and covers a distinct period of their prolific history that can either be aired as one two-part series, or as your choice of two insightful one-hour programs. FARTHER ALONG picks up the story in 1968 and details how the Byrds' legendary Act I was followed by one of rock history's most fascinating second acts. Despite their lower record sales, the Byrds' later incarnations alternately defined and re-defined "country-rock," thanks to the influential contributions by folks like Gram Parsons and guitarist Clarence White. As with the first segment, FARTHER ALONG feature the wide range of music that made The Byrds of the 60s most influential bands, along with comments by its two longest-lasting members: Roger McGuinn and Chris Hillman. Writers David Fricke, Anthony DeCurtis, Lenny Kaye and Byrds historian Sid Griffin are also interviewed. Instead of being directed by the singular vision of one leader, The Byrds were consistently led by everybody's contributions - from their original five members to the musicians involved with their later years. "They all brought something new and something defining," says journalist David Fricke, "and it all became part of the Byrds sound. They didn?t change the Byrds to the degree that it changed the sound. What they did became the Byrds." Broadcast Window: Begins late September 2006, available for all USA radio broadcasters at no cost. 9/30 update: In addition to the 0:59 version posted on the audio page, there is also a 0:54 "news-hole" show in two parts - a 1:00 billboard and the 53:00 program.

The Byrds (part 1): There is a Season

From Joyride Media | Part of the The Byrds: There is a Season / Farther Along series | 59:05

The first of two one-hour documentaries on The Byrds, covering 1964 to 1967: the hitmaking years of the band's original five members.

Tambourine_small The first of two one-hour documentaries on The Byrds, the continuously groundbreaking band who bridged the gaps between The Beatles, Bob Dylan, Pete Seeger, the Beach Boys, the Los Angeles psychedelic underground and classic country. Their memorable music set the stage for everyone from the Eagles to Tom Petty to R.E.M. Each hour is hosted by singer-songwriter Laura Cantrell, and covers a distinct period of their prolific history that can either be aired as one two-part series, or as your choice of two insightful one-hour programs.

THERE IS A SEASON covers 1964-1967, the all-too-brief hitmaking years of the Byrds' original five members - Roger McGuinn, David Crosby, Chris Hillman, Gene Clark and Michael Clarke. They were an electrified folk band who topped the charts with some of the decades' most innovative singles and albums. By 1967, their musical harmony was engulfed by the off-stage disharmony that pushed them to reach those heights. Instead of being directed by the singular vision of one leader, The Byrds were consistently led by everybody's contributions - from their original five members to the musicians involved with their later years.

Despite the inner turmoil that resulted in a revolving cast of characters, the Byrds always used those changes as opportunities to further their musical evolution. "They all brought something new and something defining," says journalist David Fricke, "and it all became part of the Byrds sound. They didn't change the Byrds to the degree that it changed the sound. What they did became the Byrds."

Both segments feature the wide range of music that made The Byrds of the 60s most influential bands, along with comments by its two longest-lasting members: Roger McGuinn and Chris Hillman. Writers David Fricke, Anthony DeCurtis, Lenny Kaye and Byrds historian Sid Griffin are also interviewed.