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Playlist: Interviews

Compiled By: Lisa Tinsley

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Allan Wolper talks to Michele Bratcher Goodwin

From Conversations with Allan Wolper | Part of the Conversations with Allan Wolper, WBGO.ORG series | 29:06

Michele Bratcher Goodwin's investigative research in human trafficking, the black market for body parts, reproductive rights, the politics of organ transplants, and bioethics has won her wide acclaim. She is a Chancellor's Professor of Law and the Director of the Center for Biotechnology and Global Health Policy at the University of California, School of Law, Irvine.

Michele_goodwin_small Michele Bratcher Goodwin's investigative research in human trafficking, the black market for body parts, reproductive rights, the politics of organ transplants, and bioethics has won her wide acclaim. She is a Chancellor's Professor of Law and the Director of the Center for Biotechnology and Global Health Policy at the University of California, School of Law, Irvine.

Poet and Children's Author Janice N. Harrington

From New Letters on the Air | 29:00

Janice N. Harrington, draws from myriad experiences to create her poetry and children's stories. In this interview with NEW LETTERS magazine editor Robert Stewart, Harrington reflects on her time as a nurse's aid and reads from her second poetry collection, THE HANDS OF STRANGERS: POEMS FROM THE NURSING HOME. She also shares poems from her earlier award-winning book, EVEN THE HOLLOW MY BODY MADE IS GONE, that reflect her childhood days in Alabama.

Janiceshow-400_small Long Description: Though she came to writing late, having spent nearly two decades as a librarian and professional storyteller, Janice N. Harrington draws from myriad experiences to create her poetry and children's stories. Her first children's book, GOING NORTH, was inspired by her move from segregated Alabama when she was eight and won the Ezra Jack Keats Award. Life in Alabama also influenced her 2007 poetry collection, EVEN THE HOLLOW MY BODY MADE IS GONE. In this interview with NEW LETTERS magazine editor Robert Stewart, Harrington reads poems from that first book and her 2011 collection THE HANDS OF STRANGERS: POEMS FROM THE NURSING HOME, which reflects on her time working as a nurse's aid. She talks about discovering the importance of the difficult, sometimes graphic experiences of that time and how putting them into poetry helped ensure that the people she met there would not be forgotten.

THE LAST DRAGON -- W. Kamau Bell Interview

From Andrea Chase | Part of the Behind the Scenes series | 22:08

W. Kamau Bell talks hidden gems, Bruce Lee’s genius, and how Berry Gordy's THE LAST DRAGON gave him his first meta-moment.

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W. Kamau Bell, comedian, podcaster, broadcaster, writer, host of the late-lamented Totally Biased, and soon to be co-host of CNN's United Shades of America, has proven himself a savvy connoisseur of cinema. Aside from the obvious entertainment value of a film, he is a student, and a fan, of the subtext of films that might not otherwise seem to have one. And so it is with Berry Gordy’s THE LAST DRAGON. When we spoke in the lobby of the fabulous Roxie Theater on December 16, 2015, it was to promote his hosting of a 30th-anniversary screening of that film, programmed at the Roxie here in San Francisco by Sam Fragoso, which will also include the film’s star, Taimak, in person. Bell’s take on the film includes the many entry points for appreciating it, from being the last Blaxploitation film of the 1970s (never mind it was made in 1985), to the whole-hearted cheesiness, to the unique space occupied by its hero, a ripped black martial-arts master who stands up for himself.  It was that last that spoke so directly to Bell’s 12-year-old self when he first encountered the film as a kid.

We went on to talk about that >other< film opening on December 18, and how both it and THE LAST DRAGON are hero’s journeys in the classic sense, but only one will have its star in attendance at the screening. Bell also explained the unexpected perfection of Motown music paired with Bruce Lee’s fluid form in combat, his attack of fanboy-itis when first meeting Taimak, and why humor works as a way to get people’s attention to the darkness of modern life when nothing else will.

 

 

 


Customer Cues

From The Drucker Institute | Part of the Drucker on the Dial series | 59:01

Host Phalana Tiller talks with retail executive Tony Spring and filmmaker Ava DuVernay about customer-centric sales and marketing.

And Rick Wartzman delivers a piece which asks: "Is there a little Rupert Murdoch in all of us?"

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Host Phalana Tiller talks with Bloomingdale's president and COO Tony Spring about the company's continual efforts at keeping an eye on what their customers value. Tiller also chats with Ava DuVernay, the award-winning director of the films "I Will Follow" and "Middle of Nowhere" and the founder of the distribution company AFFRM (the African American Film Festival Releasing Movement).

The conversations explore the central role of the "customer" in these two very different industries.

And Rick Wartzman delivers a piece which asks: "Is there a little Rupert Murdoch in all of us?"

"Drucker on the Dial" pieces are EVERGREEN and can STAND ALONE or as part of a SERIES. 

Benjamin Chavis Interview

From Don Merrill | 29:55

Benjamin Chavis, civil rights icon and new president and CEO of the National Newspaper Publishers Association talks with interviewer Don Merrill.

Ben_chavis_small Dr. Benjamin Chavis is a civil rights pioneer. He led the NAACP in the early 90s and he was the director of the Million Man March. He is involved in a number of self empowerment initiatives including a collaboration with media mogul Russell Simmons to use hip hop as a way for youth to transmit experiential messages to the larger community. Mr. Chavis was recently elevated to the position of president and CEO of the National Newspaper Publishers Association. Don Merrill sat down with Mr. Chavis to talk about his newest job to once again help energize and educate not just black communities but all communities.

Mariann Hyland Interview

From Don Merrill | 29:38

Mariann Hyland, a Portland Oregon attorney, along with a partner and a programmer, created the controversial "DWB" or "Driving While Black" app. She talks with freelance reporter Don Merrill about the app and its implication in light of the April 2015 police shooting of an unarmed motorist in South Carolina.

Mariann_hyland_small Mariann Hyland, a Portland Oregon attorney, along with a partner and a programmer, created the controversial "DWB" or "Driving While Black" app.  She talks with freelance reporter Don Merrill about the app and its implication in light of the April 2015 police shooting of an unarmed motorist in South Carolina.