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Playlist: Health

Compiled By: Lisa Tinsley

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Preaching Healthy Living in African-American Churches

From Scott Goldberg | 06:33

Diabetes among African-American adults has reached epidemic proportions. Healthy Bodies, Healthy Souls -- an innovative public health program in Baltimore -- is going after the problem by connecting with people where they pray.

Healty09102010

The rate of diabetes among African-American adults is 63% greater than the rate found in the general population. The problem is exacerbated in the inner-city where there are barriers to accessing healthy foods and participating in physical activity. In Baltimore, the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has teamed up with African American churches to find creative, sustainable ways to bring down the obesity level among parishioners. I visited one church, Gospel Tabernacle, and filed this report.

Sampson Davis

From New Visions, New Voices | Part of the My Mic is Hot with Michael Eric Dyson series | 04:29

Rarely do we hear about the nation's health care crisis from the prospective of a doctor in the trenches who is also a product of the urban community that he serves. That’s the unique perspective of Dr. Sampson Davis, an emergency room physician in a Newark hospital and author of “Living and Dying in Brick City: An E.R. Doctor Returns Home.”

Sampson_davis_small Turn on any cable news channel and you’re bound to hear one talking head or another droning on about the nation’s health care crisis. Rarely, however, do you hear it from the prospective of a doctor in the trenches. And not just any doctor, but a doctor who is a product of the urban community that he serves. That’s what you get from the book “Living and Dying in Brick City: An E.R. Doctor Returns Home.” The author, Dr. Sampson Davis, is an emergency room physician in a Newark hospital, and sometimes the patients who come through its doors are a reminder of the road he didn’t take.

HIV Education in the African American Church (Half Hour Version)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes series | 29:00

Psychologist John Fife is working to address what he says is a critical need for HIV interventions that target older Americans, specifically older African Americans. He says religious organizations play a key role. And more...

Bible-85815_640_small Since the first case of AIDS was reported in the United States more than 30 years ago, prevention programs have been successful at curbing the number of new cases of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. But those programs are often aimed at young people. Psychologist John Fife is working to address what he says is a critical need for HIV interventions that target older Americans, specifically older African Americans. He says religious organizations play a key role. And: Cataracts cause decades of blindness for millions of people, and there aren’t enough surgeons trained in the five-minute procedure to remove them. Glenn Strauss (Help Me See ) is working with engineers to design a virtual simulator that will train 30,000 specialists in the surgery in an effort to give developing countries access to the life-changing operation.

Dr. Chileshe Nkonde-Price, Social Media Lab UPENN School of Medicin

From CHC Radio | Part of the Conversations on Health Care series | 30:00

This week, hosts Mark Masselli and Margaret Flinter speak with Dr. Chileshe Nkonde-Price, Cardiologist and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation/US Department of Veterans Affairs Clinical Scholar at UPENN School of Medicine. Dr. Price discusses the digital platform she developed, Change My Steps, designed to assist African American Women in reducing risk factors for higher rates of cardiovascular disease.

Logo_small This week, hosts Mark Masselli and Margaret Flinter speak with Dr. Chileshe Nkonde-Price, Cardiologist and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation/US Department of Veterans Affairs Clinical Scholar at UPENN School of Medicine. Dr. Price discusses the digital platform she developed, Change My Steps, designed to assist African American Women in reducing risk factors for higher rates of cardiovascular disease.  Marianne O'Hare has the week's healthcare headlines. Lori Robertson checks in from FactCheck.org. And New York's CityBike program hits a milestone.
 

HeLa Cells

From William S. Hammack | Part of the Stories of Technology series | 02:27

We owe a major step in the eradication of polio, and a host of other diseases, to one unsung person. I'd say hero, but this person never knew what they did. Henerietta Lacks' cancer cells were the first human cells to live indefinitely outside the body.

Default-piece-image-0 In 1951, a thirty-one year old women named Henrietta Lacks lay in a segregated ward of the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. Poor and African-American, born to tobacco pickers from Virginia, Lacks herself was the mother of four. She was dying of cervical cancer. As the hospital's gynecologist sewed radioactive radium to her cervix in an attempt to kill her cancer, he took, without her knowing, a small sample of her tumor. A hospital doctor noticed that Henrietta Lack's reproduced in the dishes - even thrived. He called them immortal because they were the first human cells to live indefinitely outside the body. Their first use was to develop the vaccine that wiped out polio. Today, nearly every lab using tissue cultures uses Henrietta Lack's cells. They call them HeLa Cells - spelled H-E-L-A - after the initial letters of her first and last names.