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Playlist: Rekha Murthy's Favorites

Compiled By: Rekha Murthy

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DYLAN: BLOWIN' IN THE WIND

From Joyride Media | Part of the DYLAN series | 59:00

Patti Smith hosts this hour of Bob Dylan music and conversation covering 1961-1964.

Bddylancover_small Bob Dylan moved to New York City in 1961, and within two years he was being lauded as the "voice of a generation." The young troubadour wasn't so interested in being that, but Dylan's meteoric rise to fame was no fluke. In his songs, Dylan captured the social consciousness of the time and took it beyond as he rejected the role of protest singer. In this hour, we'll hear about Dylan's early years as he moved from folk singer-songwriter to rock and roll star. Interviews: Bob Neuwirth, Ray Benson, George Wein, John Hammond, Suze Rotolo, David Nelson, Tom Morello, Dave Van Ronk, Bill Flanagan, Rush Rehm, Sean Wilentz, John Cohen, Greil Marcus, Anthony DeCurtis

0:00 -- 18:00 Segment 1

In:  "He became an artist in front of everybody's very eyes..."
Out:  "I'm Patti Smith, and you're listening to Bob Dylan:  Blowin' In The Wind."

18:00 -- 19:00  Break 1 with music bed

19:00 -- 41:00 Segment 2

In:  "Welcome back to Bob Dylan: Blowin' In The Wind.  I'm Patti Smith."
Out:  "I'm Patti Smith, and you're listening to Bob Dylan:  Blowin' In The Wind."

41:00 -- 42:00  Break 2 with music bed

42:00 -- 59:00  Segment 3

In:  "Welcome back to Bob Dylan:  Blowin' In The Wind.  I'm Patti Smith."
Out:  "I'm Patti Smith, and thanks for listening."

Mom's Good Move Special

From Long Haul Productions | 58:59

An hour-long special about starting over late in life.

Pegforsalesm_small Whether they are forced to, or whether they plan to, each year more and more seniors move into retirement homes. In the year 2000, Peg Collison was one of them. Peg left the town of San Mateo, California - where she'd been living for almost 35 years - and moved two hours away into a newly built retirement community in Davis, California. These transitions are often difficult not just for the person who's actually moving but for family members and for friends left behind. Peg's son, Dan, gave his Mom a tape recorder and asked her document her transition. Together, Peg and Dan produced a three-part series in 2000 on Peg's move and what it meant to her and her family. In 2005, Dan updated Peg's situation. This documentary is a hour-long special combining all four stories.

After Oil

From 90.1 WFYI Public Radio | 58:58

When we look at all the things that made America what it is, It's fair to say that for the last hundred years or so, America has been shaped, more than anything, by cheap oil. But now, there are plenty of people telling us: "The party is over." The cheap oil is almost gone.

Afteroil_small When we look at all the things that made America what it is, It's fair to say that for the last hundred years or so, America has been shaped, more than anything, by cheap oil. But now, there are plenty of people telling us: "The party is over." The cheap oil is almost gone. America has always responded well to a crisis. But, thinking about "Peak Oil" -- considering the magnitude, the devastation it could cause to our lives and lifestyles ..... Considering all of that, the question becomes: Can we act BEFORE the crisis? To protect everything we take for granted today .... to stave-off a world Running on Empty? We HAVE the tools. But do we have the will? Do we have the determination? Do we have .... the energy? Join Barbara Bogaev from the Purdue College of Engineering for an exploration of our life - After Oil. Written and produced by Richard Paul. Peak oil, running out of oil, cheap oil, Oil, alternative energy, energy efficiency, coal to liquids, coal gasification, Rick Wagoner, Roger Bezdek , Matt Simmons, Twilight in the Desert: The Coming Saudi Oil Shock and the World Economy, Joan Ogden, Institute Of Transportation Studies, Mike Ramage, Jay Gore, Purdue University?s Energy Center, Ernest Moniz, Reinhard Radermacher, Center for Environmental Energy Engineering, Dave Hamilton, Dakota Gasification Company, Sally Benson, Genencor, Jack Hutner, Michelle Holbrook, cellulosic ethanol, Mujeeb Ijaz, Rakesh Agrawal, Frank Lomax, H2Gen, hydrogen, Ron Gettelfinger, Alan Mulally, David Morris, Institute for Local Self Reliance

An Addict Named Lady

From Next Generation Radio | Part of the NPR's Next Generation Radio series | 04:46

A suburban family?s secret struggle with an uncommon addiction comes to light in this personal essay by Laura Mirsch.

Default-piece-image-2 A suburban family?s secret struggle with an uncommon addiction comes to light in this personal essay by Laura Mirsch.

In Defense of Bad Weather

From Guy Hand | 07:54

A good natured defense of bad weather.

Default-piece-image-1 Guy Hand, who frequently writes about the media and the environment, takes a humorous, first person look at bad weather and decides he likes it. Through news, film, and musical clips, Hand explains the media's love of meteorological mayhem and how that skewed focus gives the rest of us the feeling we could be flushed, freeze-dried, or fried by bad weather at any moment. This piece aired on Living On Earth in mid-February 2005.

The Change In Farming

From Canadian Broadcasting Corporation | Part of the CBC Radio's Outfront series | 11:50

This story by Adam Goddard, a Toronto-based composer, is a celebration of the life and character of his grandfather.

Prxoutfrontplain_small The Change In Farming by Adam Goddard Producer: Steve Wadhams This story by Adam Goddard, a Toronto-based composer, is a celebration of the life and character of his grandfather, a farmer in rural Ontario. The Change in Farming won the 1999 Prix Italia for Best Cultural Radio Documentary of the Year and the Premios Ondas International Radio award in Spain. Broadcast on CBC Radio's Outfront: March 13, 1998 December 31, 1998 October 4, 1999 October 25, 2004 SEE ADDITIONAL LICENSE TERMS Outfront Opening and Closing Theme available - (see Rundown section for more details)

Auditorium

From David Green | 02:49

A third grader recalls an unusual problem he had during an assembly when he was in first grade.

Playing
Auditorium
From
David Green

Default-piece-image-2 Chris recalls the complications which ensue when a seven-year-old's curiosity and impulsiveness combine with an inclination to follow the rules. Ultimately, a bit of first grade ingenuity solves the problem. This story was originally part of a site-specific audio tour of our school written and recorded by third graders. The stories recount school memories ranging from kindergarten to third grade which reference specific locations, landmarks and objects on campus. While these pieces were originally created to be listened to on-site, they can be enjoyed on their own as well. We also recommend that you listen using headphones.

Boredom

From KBOO Youth Collective | 07:15

Dramatization of a summer day gone wrong

Default-piece-image-0 Braodcast on the "Summer" themed show of The Underground, the KBOO youth collective's monthly public affairs show. Broadcast initailly August 25, 2004, on KBOO Portland OR.

Abortion

From Appalachian Media Institute | 06:16

A young woman from eastern kentucky shares her story about the stigma and difficulty of navigating an unwanted pregnancy in a community where even the mention of abortion is taboo.

Default-piece-image-2 AMI producer Russell Wright talks with a young woman from eastern Kentucky about her experience dealing with her unwanted pregnancy and the choices she made.

First Love

From Dmae Roberts | 03:41

Vox collage with men and women of various ages talking about their first love.

Playing
First Love
From
Dmae Roberts

Love_small I first did this vox collage in 1986 and it aired at the end of All Things Considered. It's very romantic, sweet and funny and set to "I Only Have Eyes For You..." (the old 50's version) Appropriate for Valentine's Day.

Post No Bills

From Robynn Takayama | 04:33

Are wheat pasted posters informative public art or vandalism?

Printsdod_small When you walk around town you?re sure to see them: large posters pasted to construction sites and the sides of buildings. Many are advertisements for movies, records, or cars. Occasionally you?ll see a poster that isn?t selling anything. It may be there to rally people for a demonstration or make a point about affordable health care. But no matter what the intentions of the poster are, these pieces of public art draw mixed reviews from political artists, storeowners, and city workers.

All Songs Considered: Guest DJ Thom York of Radiohead

From NPR Music | Part of the All Songs Considered from NPR Music series | 28:59

Radiohead frontman Thom Yorke shares some of his favorite music with All Songs Considered host Bob Boilen.

Collage_small Radiohead frontman Thom Yorke shares some of his favorite music with All Songs Considered host Bob Boilen. The two talk about Radiohead's latest work, In Rainbows and listen to some of the artists Yorke admires, including German electronica group Modeselektor, rapper Madvillain, techno duo Autechre and more. More info: (Click on the "For Stations" tab for set list and timing cues.) Available for free to NPR member stations. If you're not an NPR member station, contact programservices@npr.org

NPR's All Songs Considered: A Great Unknowns Showcase

From NPR Music | Part of the All Songs Considered from NPR Music series | 28:59

This week's edition of All Songs Considered is full of surprises: great music from bands we'd never heard of before.

Collage_small This week's edition of All Songs Considered is full of surprises: great music from bands we'd never heard of before. They're not the easiest names to search for online: AU, Bell, Okay are a few of them. But they're all making inspired, richly diverse and beautifully produced albums. Hear the art-folk group Bowerbirds, Russian-born singer Olga Bell, the pop trio Try Me Bicycle (from our 'Second Stage' series) and more. More info: (Click on the "For Stations" tab for set list and timing cues.) Available for free to NPR member stations. If you're not an NPR member station, contact programservices@npr.org

Homebrew Cellphones

From Spectrum Radio | Part of the Spectrum Radio series | 09:28

Homebrew Tech Club makes a comeback in the 21st century with cellphones.

Ieee Spectrum Radio's Tekla Perry visits the Homebrew Cellphone Club gurus who like to accessorize current cellphones to make them better, faster and with more personal features.

The Perfect Photo

From Jake Warga | 07:07

An attempt to take a photo just like in the Nationa Geographic

060325225_small Armed with an article from the National Geographic, I try to take the same image in Lalibella Ethiopia...comic consequences ensue

How Are You Who You Are?

From Eric Winick | 21:13

A disinhibited love story.

62003_small In 1995, Douglas A. Nadeau of Marblehead, Massachusetts underwent a pallidotomy at Mass. General Hospital, an operation designed to eradicate neurons in his brain that no longer responded to dopamine, the naturally-created chemical that facilitates movement. Nine years earlier, while on a business trip, Doug had been bitten by an insect and developed strange Parkinsonian symptoms, such as the inability to keep his eyes open while talking. These caused numerous problems for Doug, a high-powered corporate lawyer in Boston. Over time, the symptoms worsened until Doug lost his mobility at night and was reduced to a hospital bed. Following the procedure, in which Doug practically walked off the operating table, he found he was unable to inhibit certain antisocial tendencies that, prior to the surgery, he'd kept repressed. To make matters worse, his surgery turned out to be a failure, and his symptoms returned one by one. The next nine years tested the boundaries and limits of love, marriage, and tolerance, both within the family and in the Nadeaus' wide circle of friends and acquaintances.

Home Is Where the Flood Was

From Salt Institute for Documentary Studies | 06:31

With failing health, Debra Dickinson saved eight dogs from the floods of Katrina.

Default-piece-image-1 Debra Dickinson used to live in Slidell, Louisiana and left to come to Maine after living through hurricane Katrina and the aftermath of the storm. Far from home, she talks of how she survived the storm, how she helped the helpless, how she got to Maine, and how all she wants now is to go home. The producer composed and recorded the music.

Fake City, Real Dreams

From Zak Rosen | 17:51

A fake city comes to life to prove that dialogue and ideas can transform a region.

Map1_small Neil Greenberg is always thinking about cities. Specifically, the way in which transit has the ability to bring people together, or pull them apart. He works days as a route scheduler for a Metro Detroit bus system. For the last 5 years, Neil has been creating his own metro region, one street name at a time. The map is drawn to scale and it's excruciatingly detailed. It takes up 17 huge poster boards that fit together like a big geographical puzzle. The maps focus a lot on transit. But Neil knows that that's just one of many layers to creating a viable and well-ran city. So he and I took his imagined world and brought into the real world we live in...Detroit. We talked to people in the city and suburbs working on other pressing issues like education, civic engagement, and jobs to fill project their vision for a better future onto the Neil's world. We also made some characters up. What follows is an audio rendering of a collective vision, of a city that could be real but isn't...at least not yet.


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Testing out the section functionality

Minibus in Syria

From World Vision Report | 03:21

The recent fighting in Gaza has led to tension throughout the region.
That tension inevitably affects foreigners. Reporter Will Everett was in Syria where his reception was less than hospitable. Then one night, at a vulnerable moment, Syrian hospitality came to his rescue.

Wv_podcast_icon_sm_small If you air this piece, please include a back announce saying "This piece originally aired on the World Vision Report." or "This piece came to us from the World Vision Report."

President Obama's 2009 Inaugural Address

From Public Radio Exchange (PRX) | 18:32

Sworn in as the 44th president of the United States, President Obama spoke of a difficult journey ahead that may take years to see through. Before one of the largest crowds ever assembled on the National Mall, Obama also touched on terrorism, hard work, and the struggle for civil rights.

Feat_624x351_inaug_prelaunch_small

I stand here today humbled by the task before us, grateful for the trust you have bestowed, mindful of the sacrifices borne by our ancestors. I thank President Bush for his service to our nation, as well as the generosity and cooperation he has shown throughout this transition.

Forty-four Americans have now taken the presidential oath. The words have been spoken during rising tides of prosperity and the still waters of peace. Yet, every so often the oath is taken amidst gathering clouds and raging storms. At these moments, America has carried on not simply because of the skill or vision of those in high office, but because We the People have remained faithful to the ideals of our forbearers, and true to our founding documents.

So it has been. So it must be with this generation of Americans.

That we are in the midst of crisis is now well understood. Our nation is at war, against a far-reaching network of violence and hatred. Our economy is badly weakened, a consequence of greed and irresponsibility on the part of some, but also our collective failure to make hard choices and prepare the nation for a new age. Homes have been lost; jobs shed; businesses shuttered. Our health care is too costly; our schools fail too many; and each day brings further evidence that the ways we use energy strengthen our adversaries and threaten our planet.

These are the indicators of crisis, subject to data and statistics. Less measurable but no less profound is a sapping of confidence across our land – a nagging fear that America’s decline is inevitable, and that the next generation must lower its sights.

Today I say to you that the challenges we face are real. They are serious and they are many. They will not be met easily or in a short span of time. But know this, America – they will be met. On this day, we gather because we have chosen hope over fear, unity of purpose over conflict and discord.

On this day, we come to proclaim an end to the petty grievances and false promises, the recriminations and worn out dogmas, that for far too long have strangled our politics.

We remain a young nation, but in the words of Scripture, the time has come to set aside childish things. The time has come to reaffirm our enduring spirit; to choose our better history; to carry forward that precious gift, that noble idea, passed on from generation to generation: the God-given promise that all are equal, all are free, and all deserve a chance to pursue their full measure of happiness.

In reaffirming the greatness of our nation, we understand that greatness is never a given. It must be earned. Our journey has never been one of short-cuts or settling for less. It has not been the path for the faint-hearted – for those who prefer leisure over work, or seek only the pleasures of riches and fame.

Rather, it has been the risk-takers, the doers, the makers of things – some celebrated but more often men and women obscure in their labor, who have carried us up the long, rugged path towards prosperity and freedom.

For us, they packed up their few worldly possessions and traveled across oceans in search of a new life.

For us, they toiled in sweatshops and settled the West; endured the lash of the whip and plowed the hard earth.

For us, they fought and died, in places like Concord and Gettysburg; Normandy and Khe Sahn.

Time and again these men and women struggled and sacrificed and worked till their hands were raw so that we might live a better life. They saw America as bigger than the sum of our individual ambitions; greater than all the differences of birth or wealth or faction.

This is the journey we continue today. We remain the most prosperous, powerful nation on Earth. Our workers are no less productive than when this crisis began. Our minds are no less inventive, our goods and services no less needed than they were last week or last month or last year. Our capacity remains undiminished. But our time of standing pat, of protecting narrow interests and putting off unpleasant decisions – that time has surely passed. Starting today, we must pick ourselves up, dust ourselves off, and begin again the work of remaking

America. For everywhere we look, there is work to be done. The state of the economy calls for action, bold and swift, and we will act - not only to create new jobs, but to lay a new foundation for growth. We will build the roads and bridges, the electric grids and digital lines that feed our commerce and bind us together. We will restore science to its rightful place, and wield technology’s wonders to raise health care’s quality and lower its cost. We will harness the sun and the winds and the soil to fuel our cars and run our factories. And we will transform our schools and colleges and universities to meet the demands of a new age. All this we can do. And all this we will do.

Now, there are some who question the scale of our ambitions - who suggest that our system cannot tolerate too many big plans.

Their memories are short. For they have forgotten what this country has already done; what free men and women can achieve when imagination is joined to common purpose, and necessity to courage.

What the cynics fail to understand is that the ground has shifted beneath them – that the stale political arguments that have consumed us for so long no longer apply. The question we ask today is not whether our government is too big or too small, but whether it works – whether it helps families find jobs at a decent wage, care they can afford, a retirement that is dignified. Where the answer is yes, we intend to move forward. Where the answer is no, programs will end. And those of us who manage the public’s dollars will be held to account - to spend wisely, reform bad habits, and do our business in the light of day – because only then can we restore the vital trust between a people and their government.

Nor is the question before us whether the market is a force for good or ill. Its power to generate wealth and expand freedom is unmatched, but this crisis has reminded us that without a watchful eye, the market can spin out of control – and that a nation cannot prosper long when it favors only the prosperous.

The success of our economy has always depended not just on the size of our Gross Domestic Product, but on the reach of our prosperity; on our ability to extend opportunity to every willing heart – not out of charity, but because it is the surest route to our common good.

As for our common defense, we reject as false the choice between our safety and our ideals. Our Founding Fathers, faced with perils we can scarcely imagine, drafted a charter to assure the rule of law and the rights of man, a charter expanded by the blood of generations. Those ideals still light the world, and we will not give them up for expedience’s sake.

And so to all other peoples and governments who are watching today, from the grandest capitals to the small village where my father was born: know that America is a friend of each nation and every man, woman, and child who seeks a future of peace and dignity, and that we are ready to lead once more.

Recall that earlier generations faced down fascism and communism not just with missiles and tanks, but with sturdy alliances and enduring convictions. They understood that our power alone cannot protect us, nor does it entitle us to do as we please. Instead, they knew that our power grows through its prudent use; our security emanates from the justness of our cause, the force of our example, the tempering qualities of humility and restraint.

We are the keepers of this legacy. Guided by these principles once more, we can meet those new threats that demand even greater effort – even greater cooperation and understanding between nations. We will begin to responsibly leave Iraq to its people, and forge a hard-earned peace in Afghanistan. With old friends and former foes, we will work tirelessly to lessen the nuclear threat, and roll back the specter of a warming planet. We will not apologize for our way of life, nor will we waver in its defense, and for those who seek to advance their aims by inducing terror and slaughtering innocents, we say to you now that our spirit is stronger and cannot be broken; you cannot outlast us, and we will defeat you.

For we know that our patchwork heritage is a strength, not a weakness. We are a nation of Christians and Muslims, Jews and Hindus – and non-believers. We are shaped by every language and culture, drawn from every end of this Earth; and because we have tasted the bitter swill of civil war and segregation, and emerged from that dark chapter stronger and more united, we cannot help but believe that the old hatreds shall someday pass; that the lines of tribe shall soon dissolve; that as the world grows smaller, our common humanity shall reveal itself; and that America must play its role in ushering in a new era of peace.

To the Muslim world, we seek a new way forward, based on mutual interest and mutual respect. To those leaders around the globe who seek to sow conflict, or blame their society’s ills on the West – know that your people will judge you on what you can build, not what you destroy. To those who cling to power through corruption and deceit and the silencing of dissent, know that you are on the wrong side of history; but that we will extend a hand if you are willing to unclench your fist.

To the people of poor nations, we pledge to work alongside you to make your farms flourish and let clean waters flow; to nourish starved bodies and feed hungry minds. And to those nations like ours that enjoy relative plenty, we say we can no longer afford indifference to suffering outside our borders; nor can we consume the world’s resources without regard to effect. For the world has changed, and we must change with it.

As we consider the road that unfolds before us, we remember with humble gratitude those brave Americans who, at this very hour, patrol far-off deserts and distant mountains. They have something to tell us today, just as the fallen heroes who lie in Arlington whisper through the ages. We honor them not only because they are guardians of our liberty, but because they embody the spirit of service; a willingness to find meaning in something greater than themselves. And yet, at this moment – a moment that will define a generation – it is precisely this spirit that must inhabit us all.

For as much as government can do and must do, it is ultimately the faith and determination of the American people upon which this nation relies. It is the kindness to take in a stranger when the levees break, the selflessness of workers who would rather cut their hours than see a friend lose their job which sees us through our darkest hours. It is the firefighter’s courage to storm a stairway filled with smoke, but also a parent’s willingness to nurture a child, that finally decides our fate.

Our challenges may be new. The instruments with which we meet them may be new. But those values upon which our success depends – hard work and honesty, courage and fair play, tolerance and curiosity, loyalty and patriotism – these things are old. These things are true. They have been the quiet force of progress throughout our history. What is demanded then is a return to these truths. What is required of us now is a new era of responsibility – a recognition, on the part of every American, that we have duties to ourselves, our nation, and the world, duties that we do not grudgingly accept but rather seize gladly, firm in the knowledge that there is nothing so satisfying to the spirit, so defining of our character, than giving our all to a difficult task.

This is the price and the promise of citizenship.

This is the source of our confidence – the knowledge that God calls on us to shape an uncertain destiny.

This is the meaning of our liberty and our creed – why men and women and children of every race and every faith can join in celebration across this magnificent mall, and why a man whose father less than sixty years ago might not have been served at a local restaurant can now stand before you to take a most sacred oath.

So let us mark this day with remembrance, of who we are and how far we have traveled. In the year of America’s birth, in the coldest of months, a small band of patriots huddled by dying campfires on the shores of an icy river. The capital was abandoned. The enemy was advancing. The snow was stained with blood. At a moment when the outcome of our revolution was most in doubt, the father of our nation ordered these words be read to the people:

Let it be told to the future world...that in the depth of winter, when nothing but hope and virtue could survive...that the city and the country, alarmed at one common danger, came forth to meet.

America. In the face of our common dangers, in this winter of our hardship, let us remember these timeless words. With hope and virtue, let us brave once more the icy currents, and endure what storms may come. Let it be said by our children’s children that when we were tested we refused to let this journey end, that we did not turn back nor did we falter; and with eyes fixed on the horizon and God’s grace upon us, we carried forth that great gift of freedom and delivered it safely to future generations."


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Running from Myself

From 826NYC | 17:51

Louis struggles to reconcile bad choices he's made in the past.

Default-piece-image-2 For most of his high school career, Louis lived in a way that he later came to regret. This piece is his investigation into why he did what he did, what made him stop, and, most importantly, if he's really changed for good. Louis tells his story in a straight-forward and engaging manner, often using conversations and interviews conducted with various figures in his life.

the brothers booth

From Nate DiMeo | Part of the the memory palace series | 05:16

In which the most famous actor in America mounts a comeback after his little brother shoots Abraham Lincoln.

Booth_240_small

This is an episode of the memory palace podcast.  Listen to every episode at www.thememorypalace.us
Each episode is a short (between 1:30 and 5:30) water-coolery story of the past, with an emphasis on American History.   

"Do Something!": An Interview With NPR's Jacki Lyden (Part One)

From Rebecca Sheir | 12:42

Part One of a conversation with the most petite powerhouse in public radio: Jacki Lyden.

2004bioslyden_small Jacki Lyden may be petite, but don’t let her height fool you: having seen and done it all at NPR since its inception in 1979, this veteran of the airwaves is nothing short of a public radio powerhouse. You’ve heard her dulcet tones as the guest host of All Things Considered and Weekend All Things Considered. You’ve listened to her thrilling reports from Jordan, Lebanon, Egypt, Afghanistan, Iran, Syria, and, most recently, Iraq. And soon you’ll be reading about her international adventures in her upcoming travelogue about the people of Iraq -- including her first translator, who served as Saddam Hussein’s top translator before defecting in 1991. Jacki’s first memoir, Daughter of the Queen of Sheba (Houghton Mifflin, 1997), tells the tale of her mother’s manic depression. It has been optioned by Paramount Studios, with Lasse Halstrom (What’s Eating Gilbert Grape, The Cider House Rules, Chocolat) set to direct. Producer Rebecca Sheir first encountered Jacki Lyden at the 2003 Third Coast International Audio Festival, an annual jamboree of public radio producers, editors and documentarians in Chicago. This month, when Jacki swung through Iowa City for the University of Iowa’s NonfictionNow Conference, Rebecca had a chance to chat with the NPR legend about her experiences as a war correspondent, a nonfiction author, and a survivor of one of the biggest pre-Janet Jackson wardrobe malfunctions ever to hit journalism.

"Do Something!": An Interview With NPR's Jacki Lyden (Part Two)

From Rebecca Sheir | 12:33

Part Two of a conversation with the most petite powerhouse in public radio: Jacki Lyden.

2004bioslyden_small Jacki Lyden may be petite, but don?t let her height fool you: having seen and done it all at NPR since its inception in 1979, this veteran of the airwaves is nothing short of a public radio powerhouse. You?ve heard her dulcet tones as the guest host of All Things Considered and Weekend All Things Considered. You?ve listened to her thrilling reports from Jordan, Lebanon, Egypt, Afghanistan, Iran, Syria, and, most recently, Iraq. And soon you?ll be reading about her international adventures in her upcoming travelogue about the people of Iraq -- including her first translator, who served as Saddam Hussein?s top translator before defecting in 1991. Jacki?s first memoir, Daughter of the Queen of Sheba (Houghton Mifflin, 1997), tells the tale of her mother?s manic depression. It has been optioned by Paramount Studios, with Lasse Halstrom (What?s Eating Gilbert Grape, The Cider House Rules, Chocolat) set to direct. Producer Rebecca Sheir first encountered Jacki Lyden at the 2003 Third Coast International Audio Festival, an annual jamboree of public radio producers, editors and documentarians in Chicago. This month, when Jacki swung through Iowa City for the University of Iowa?s NonfictionNow Conference, Rebecca had a chance to chat with the NPR legend about her experiences as a war correspondent, a nonfiction author, and a survivor of one of the biggest pre-Janet Jackson wardrobe malfunctions ever to hit journalism.

A Short History of Music as a Weapon

From Aaron Henkin | 05:25

From Scottish bagpipes to Metallica, this radio essay takes listeners on a short tour through the history of music as a weapon.

Default-piece-image-2 This sound essay starts in 1745 with the bagpipers of the Jacobite Rebellion and winds its way through the standoff with the Branch Davidians in Waco and into US Psychological Operations in Iraq. I tried to formulate the piece as a sort of 'theatre of the mind' tour through these three historical moments. I was inspired to put this thing together after reading an incredible essay by Maryland Institute College of Art historian Kerr Houston. The essay is entitled "Start Walking Boots: Music as a Weapon in Iraq and Beyond." I aired my radio essay as an intro to a subsequent interview with Houston about his research, which covers a lot of other related historical moments. I think the radio feature is a nice stand-alone think-piece, but if you're the host of a long-form talk program and you really want to do it up, you could get in touch with Houston for a live follow-up interview, maybe take some callers. He's a really nice guy, and he knows this subject thoroughly. Just send me an email and I'll put you in touch with him. One warning: You'll probably never want to listen to Nancy Sinatra again after hearing this! (This piece aired originally 03.18.05 on WYPR's weekly arts program, The Signal.)

Global Culture

From Lydon McGrath Productions | 58:30

This is hour 4 of The Whole Wide World: a 7-part series on globalization

Yo_small World-famous cellist Yo-Yo Ma demonstrates his own search - on Asia's ancient "Silk Road" as well as in Brazil, Argentina and Africa - for the roots of musical expression. Yo-Yo Ma has un- and re-written the Kipling dictum of a century ago that "East is East and west is west." Yo-Yo Ma himself is proof that the twain don't just meet each other coming and going now; they intertwine each other throughout the world in people?s hearts and personal stories. Take a musical voyage this hour with Yo-Yo Ma through the fear and unfamiliarity of the perilous moment we are all now in and discover the contradictions in our world that the vocabulary of culture and music can embrace. Guest: Yo Yo Ma

God is Talking to Me

From Hans Anderson | 09:24

When God talks to me, sometimes it means I have to do things I don't want to do

Default-piece-image-1 This piece was produced in response to a call for fiction for B-side Radio in Berkeley.  Learn more about B-side at http://www.bside-radio.org. For more information and conversation, visit this feature on Transom.org.

Junk Drawers

From Northern Community Radio - KAXE & KBXE | Part of the Between You and Me series | 02:00:28

It’s that time of year again!

Time to clean out your JUNK DRAWERS!

Tune in this Saturday to Between You and Me with Heidi Holtan

from 10-noon

Junk drawer expert John Bauer will be assisting

you in your decisions to KEEP IT or CHUCK IT

Join the community junk drawer clean-out

Junk_drawer_small Our weekly get-together, a mix of music and conversation.

Curiosity and Other Riddles [30:00 AND 20:00 versions]

From Cambridge Science Fest Crew | 30:18

Questions and answers from some of the most curious people in the world.

If you could understand one thing about how the world works, what would it be? We asked budding school-age scientists what they want to know -- and then we took those questions to some of the brightest scientists in Cambridge. After taking a stab at the questions, we asked the scientists what big unanswered questions THEY most wanted to understand, and took those sometimes cosmic and often existential questions back to the kids, for answers. Both 30 and 20-minute versions are available below.

Investigating_kids_small This half-hour program is about embracing curiosity, discovery, and the common human quest to understand our environment.  We started out by asking school-age kids what they were curious about -- then we took those questions to some of the brightest scientists in Cambridge.  After taking a stab at the questions, we asked the scientists what big unanswered questions THEY most wanted to understand, and took those sometimes cosmic and often existential questions back to the kids, for answers.  This program was produced in conjunction with the Cambridge Science Festival, and aired on 4/29/2010 on WMBR in Cambridge, MA.  Learn more about the producers at AriDanielShapiro.com and NeighborhoodRadio.org.

Scientists Featured:
MIT Synthetic Neurobiologist, Ed Boyden; Harvard Molecular Geneticist, George Church; Harvard Science Historian, Peter Galison; Harvard Coginitive Neuroscientist, Marc Hauser; Harvard Evolutionary Geneticist, Pardis Sabeti; and MIT Social Cognitive Neuroscientist, Rebecca Saxe.

Julie the Amtrak God

From Jenny Asarnow | 03:00

Conversations with Julie, the voice on the Amtrak telephone line

Shutterstock_136027958_small These are dialogues that actually took place between me and Julie, the automated voice of Amtrak. I let her direct our conversation and allowed myself to be (mostly) passive. I was feeling lost, and I felt she could give me direction. A slightly longer version of this piece was featured in Chaise DVD Magazine (Issue 1). A remixed version (involving dance beats) was featured in Free Matter for the Blind (an audiozine), volume 6. That version of the piece aired on WFMU in June 2004. You can listen to it here: http://www.wfmu.org/playlists/shows/11845 This version has not been aired

Eat Cake

From The Truth | 10:35

Can coconut cake + random phone calls = love? Find out, when these two Valentine's Day traditions collide.

Playing
Eat Cake
From
The Truth

Valentines2_small Elizabeth and Brian are strangers. It's Valentine's Day. They're lonely, as usual. But things will be different this year, when one random call from the phone book and a slice of coconut cake collide. This fictional romantic comedy was originally produced for Weekend America's final broadcast in January 2009.

Original music composed and performed by the producer specifically for this piece.

Scared

From John Biewen | 03:00

A (very) short story of love and anxiety. A child grows to age 13 in three minutes while a father muses on parental fears.

Playing
Scared
From
John Biewen

Harper-john-small_small This essay/montage was produced for the Third Coast Audio Festival's 2008 Audio Challenge, Radio Ephemera.  The challenge was to produce a piece of no more than three minutes based on any two of five books selected from the Prelinger Library of San Francisco -- and to include the voice of a stranger.  "Scared" is based on the books, "Control of Mind and Body," and "The Stork Didn't Bring You!: The Facts of Life for Teenagers."  The stranger is the voicemail lady.  

Maggots are our friends

From Paula Kahumbu | Part of the The Amazing World of African Insects series | 03:29

One of the most disgusting creatures is in fact one of the most useful. Join Paula Kahumbu and Dino Martins on a smelly journey of discovery.

Maggots_2_small One of the most disgusting creatures is in fact one of the most useful. Join Paula Kahumbu and Dino Martins on a smelly journey of discovery.

Dayenu

From Judith Sloan | 05:03

Actress/Radio Producer Judith Sloan produces Dayenu, a story/commentary with music by Frank London and Judith Sloan. Sloan looks at the complexity of Passover, questioning the meaning of Dayenu (Enough), asking when the world will have had enough of war, torture, and hatred, and asks what it will take to share the planet. Winner Missouri Review National Audio Competition, 2009.

Playing
Dayenu
From
Judith Sloan

Hagadah_cover_small The word "Dayenu" means approximately, "it would have been enough for us" or "it would have sufficed." At Passover, Jewish families the world over gather together to recount the epic story of how the Jewish exodus from Egypt. The Passover seder is a special event steeped in symbolism ... The assembled group reads from a "haggadah" (ha-GAH-dah) retelling the story of Exodus. Certain symbolic foods are eaten. These traditions go back thousands of years. Judith Sloan looked through the haggadah her father left her. When Judith sings the song "dayenu" (die-EH-new) ... she considers that word…she's thinking about hardship, war and torture and whether we've had "enough." She's thinking about food and water and natural resources and wondering if we'll ever have "enough." She’s thinking about terror and revenge and wondering when we’ll have enough. She’s thinking about what it takes to ‘talk to your enemy’, in the hopes that we will, as a species, have had enough terror and war.

My Plate Full, Yours Empty

From Curie Youth Radio | 02:05

What one family makes for dinner when the cabinets are empty.

Youth_radio_small Even when Abdel Mutan's family was going hungry, he didn't know it.  Here he talks to his mother, remembering an evening when Abdel's mother put her family first and herself second.

Curie Youth Radio is a writing and radio production class at Curie High School on Chicago's Southwest side.

Here, students create their own stories: fresh takes on everything from snowball fights to gang warfare. They see their stories as a way for teenagers in one Chicago high school to reach out to the rest of the world.

Different, Not Disabled: The Perception of My Mind

From WHJE | 05:47

Aspergers, in my opinion, has always been misunderstood due to it being a medical "condition." When you listen to this, I ask that you go in with an open mind, and try to imagine the best you can. I promise I'll try my best to explain what it is like to be...well, me.

Kathan_small

Aspergers, in my opinion, has always been misunderstood due to it being a medical "condition." People look in and try to explain something from what they see, and the behaviors they observe from the outside.

I've thought of many reasons as to what Aspergers is in a medical field, reaching concepts and ideas ranging as far as: "The mind's tendency to drop below correct brainwave frequencies and drop into a hyper-focused state."

But even my own theories fail to portray what it's like. As the cliché goes, "don't judge a book by its cover." That is all that is achieved by these studies. With information people obtained from face value, trying to figure out kids with conditions such as mine becomes a goal of trying to figure out English with algebra.

So, taking a bound away from logic, I've gone and explored my own mind, and what I found is something that can't be told, it needs to be experienced. When you listen to this, I ask that you go in with an open mind, and try to imagine the best you can. I promise I'll try my best to explain what it is like to be... well, me.



Let Them Eat Cake: Filipino Annabelle Abaya on Brokering Peace

From PBS Women, War & Peace Podcast | 07:52

Annabelle Abaya, who has served as the Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process in the Philippines and founded The Conflict Resolution Group Foundation, describes her approach to the peace process, explaining why women make good mediators.

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Welcome to Women, War & Peace’s podcast series with our host, Amy Costello. Each week, Amy will be talking to people who have responded creatively to the plight of women living in conflict zones.

Annabelle Abaya has served as the Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process in the Philippines and founded The Conflict Resolution Group Foundation. Abaya has been celebrated for her record of opening four deadlocked peace processes in the country, in which combatants have ranged from Muslim separatists, to communists, to criminal groups.

Abaya describes her approach to the peace process, why women are naturally good mediators and her secret weapon for bringing combatants to the peace table.

Promo: Sesame St

From PRX Remix | :26

A remix paying homage to the classic children's program Sesame St. while also spelling out PRX.

3591355778_acbc58a2a4_b_small A remix paying homage to the classic children's program Sesame St. while also spelling out PRX.

Greeting Cards

From Sarah Lilley | 05:35

Greeting card writer David Ellis Dickerson explains the art of the card.

Davedstreet_small Greeting card writer David Ellis Dickerson explains the art of the card.

Kyenkyen Bi Adi Mawu

From Song and Memory | 05:16

The exhiled son of Ghana's former emir, king of the Muslim people, remembers the song his father listened to as he carried the burden of leading Ghana's Muslim people.

Thumbsong_small Mohammed Naseehu Ali, a native of Ghana, is one of a number of sons of the emir, or king, of the Muslim people of that West African nation. Unlike his brothers and cousins, Ali left Ghana behind to be educated in the United States, where, instead of returning to tribal politics, he became a musician and writer. For this segment of the Song and Memory Series he describes the song that is most memorable to him, "Kyenkyen Bi Adi Mawu" (chen-chen-bee-Ahdee-Maywah) by Alhaki K. Frimpong and his Cubano Fiesta. Mohammed also plays the drums along with the song. "Kyenkyen Bi Adi Mawu" is "the national anthem of Ghana," at least according to the people of Zongo Street, the neighborhood of Ali's youth in Ghana. The song reminds Ali of the heavy burden his father felt as the monarch of the muslim people of Ghana.

Talk to Me About Love

From Third Coast International Audio Festival | Part of the 2006 Third Coast ShortDocs: 99 Ways To Tell a Radio Story series | 02:30

Two curious siblings finally get what they think they've always wanted.

Shortdocs06_small Two curious siblings finally get what they think they've always wanted.

Talk to Me About Love was produced by Jill Dorothy Summers and David Whitcomb for the 2006 Third Coast ShortDocs Challenge: 99 Ways To Tell a Radio Story. Inspired by cartoonist Matt Madden and the french literary group Oulipo, the 99 Ways Challenge invited anyone and everyone to produce short audio works following a set of rules. Each submission had to:
- start with some manifestation of "To begin with, they never got along." 
- include a pre-recorded voice, rhythmic noise and exclamation 
- last exactly 2:30 minutes
 
 

Peace.

From Jenna Hammerich | 12:26

When you're raised by hippies, anything goes.

Playing
Peace.
From
Jenna Hammerich

Vectorflowers_small A child of 70s flower children, I grew up with no rules, no discipline. What awful kind of adult would I be?

In praise of "Lost Causes"

From Amy Costello | Part of the Tiny Spark series | 14:56

In this edition of Tiny Spark, we explore what happens when someone refuses to accept the idea of a "lost cause" and instead gets down to the work of transforming a troubled life.

Goso_prx_small

We explore what happens when someone refuses to accept the idea of a "lost cause" and instead gets down to the work of transforming a troubled life.

We hear the story of former executive, Mark Goldsmith, who was asked to volunteer as Principal for the Day at a New York City public high school. The self-described "wise guy" agreed but told organizers, "I want a really tough school." So they sent him to Rikers Island, New York City's largest jail. Goldsmith spent the day sharing with young inmates some of the lessons he'd learned in the world of business. "I created an analogy between General Motors and a drug cartel," he explained. "And I showed them that the Kingpin who heads up the drug cartel is no different from the Chairman of the Board of General Motors."

The students were enthralled by Goldsmith's presentation and officials invited him to return the following year.  Goldsmith later formed Getting Out & Staying Out, a nonprofit that brings successful leaders to Rikers Island to speak with inmates. The organization encourages inmates to start planning for their release while they're still in prison and provides a range of services to the young men once they're released.

One of those men is Phillip Whyte, a 24-year-old former inmate who heard about Getting Out & Staying Out when he was serving time for a robbery conviction. Whyte, who was raised by a single mother, tells us that Goldsmith is a father figure to him now. "Even though I'm 24, I have way more learning to do," he explains. "And sometimes you have to talk to a knowledgeable person who is successful in what they do." Whyte will soon complete his Associate's Degree and interns at the hip hop label Wu Tang Management.

Is the U.S. Troop Withdrawal Bad for Afghan Women? An interview with Gayle Tzemach Lemmon

From PBS Women, War & Peace Podcast | 07:53

In Afghanistan, there are fears that the pending U.S. withdrawal of troops will leave a vacuum for the Taliban to regain control. This could have potentially catastrophic results for many civilians in Afghanistan, especially women and girls.

But Gayle Tzemach Lemmon recently wrote a book that challenges many of our ideas about the lives of women under the Taliban. The Dressmaker of Khair Khana profiles a young entrepreneur who actually managed to prosper under the Taliban’s repressive reign.

Women finding their way around the Taliban…. Next, on Women War & Peace.

Gayletzemachlemmon_small

In Afghanistan, there are fears that the pending U.S. withdrawal of troops will leave a vacuum for the Taliban to regain control. This could have potentially catastrophic results for many civilians in Afghanistan, especially women and girls.

But Gayle Tzemach Lemmon recently wrote a book that challenges many of our ideas about the lives of women under the Taliban.The Dressmaker of Khair Khana profiles a young entrepreneur who actually managed to prosper under the Taliban’s repressive reign.

Women finding their way around the Taliban…. Next, on Women War & Peace.

Paul Pena's Kargyraa Moan

From Jonathan Mitchell | 05:24

a blues singer discovers a new voice

Pena_small UPDATE from www.paulpena.com: We're sad to report that Paul passed away Saturday October 1, 2005 in the early evening at his apartment in San Francisco. He'd been through a long battle with Pancreatitis and Diabetes. This is a huge loss for all of us. During the the past 8 years, Paul's health has been on the decline and his quality of life was greatly diminished by the nearly constant state of pain that he was in. We can take comfort in knowing that he's no longer suffering. October 2, 2005 San Francisco Please be aware of Paul's passing if this piece is aired on your station. HOST IN: Songwriter Paul Pena (PAY-nuh) wrote the 70s-rock classic "Jet Airliner" (made popular when it was recorded by the Steve Miller Band), and he's been singing the blues since he was a kid. But after an unexpected encounter with the throat-singing tradition of Tuva (TOO-vuh), the blind blues singer recharted his musical life. He studied, practiced, and then flew all the way to Central Asia to compete in a Tuvan throat singing competition. Pena's full-throated rumble did very well. In this piece, Pena tells the story of how he discovered Tuvan throat singing, and how he learned the technique. HOST OUT: The singer Paul Pena, performing in Tuva at the Khomei (KOH-may) Symposium and Contest a few years ago. He won in his division, and the film "Genghis Blues" chronicles Pena's visit to Tuva. Jonathan Mitchell produced our story. This piece orginally aired on Studio 360 in July, 2003.

Portrait of the Bully as a Young Man

From Blunt Youth Radio Project | 09:34

Jeff's reputation as a bully was something of a legend in the coastal town where he grew up. Eight years later, and with a chance to start over again, Jeff knows why he bullied...and why he might not stop.

Img_9595_small Jeff's reputation as a bully was something of a legend in the coastal town where he grew up.  Eight years later, and with a chance to start over again, Jeff knows why he bullied...and why it might still work for him.  Can you grow out of bullying?  And what would it take for bullying to seem less useful in the first place?

This piece was produced by Jones Franzel with funding from a Transom Donor Grant.  It is presented by Blunt Youth Radio's Incarcerated Youth Speak Out Project.

The Friendly Rabid Squirrel

From JP Davidson | 06:41

When I was 9 years old, a rabid squirrel bit me.

Black_squirrel_img_5604-thumb_small

It was a beautiful spring day. I was playing outside when I spotted something furry next to the house, and went over to investigate. It turned out to be a fluffy little squirrel. I'd never seen a squirrel act so tame before – he’d come right up to me. He was moving slower than I'd ever seen a squirrel move before, like he was drunk or something. This made him seem more... approachable. I figured this was my lucky day - If I played my cards right, I'd get to pet this little guy. We might even become best friends. He could live in my pocket.

He scurried up to me as if he wanted something. I thought he might be thirsty, so I ran inside as quick as I could to get him something. I came back out with a pie plate of water, and he was still there, acting as squirrely as ever. I lowered the water to the ground and he came up to investigate. At this point, I figured we'd developed a bit of a rapport - so I extended my hand tentatively to pet him.

He bit me, hard, and ran away. Our budding friendship was dashed, and I was bleeding a little. 

My dad’s a doctor, but he wasn’t worried when I told him about the bite. Squirrels weren’t known to carry rabies. All that changed when, a couple of weeks later, the news reported a few confirmed cases of rabid in squirrels nearby. That freaked my parents out – rabies can be fatal once symptoms appear – and those can develop months after exposure. So my dad whisked me away to the clinic where he worked to have one of his colleagues stick me with the vaccine.

I didn’t enjoy the two needles the doctor gave me – but when he said there were “only” SIX MORE to go – I decided I’d had enough. Instinct took over and I scurried to safety under the doctor's desk. Pretty soon my dad’s colleague – a usually dignified physician – was on his hands and knees trying to get me out, while I cowered like a caged animal. My dad looked on awkwardly, not knowing what to do. Dad had dealt with difficult kids in the clinic before, but I think he was pretty embarrassed to see his own son acting out like that.
Eventually – a nurse heard the commotion and came to the rescue. She produced a full-sized (not fun-sized) Kit-Kat chocolate bar, and lured me out of my burrow. It worked, but damn those next six shots hurt.

That day I learned that squirrels, doctors, and sweet delicious chocolate have something in common. Betrayal. 

Radio Graffiti

From David Weinberg | Part of the Random Tape series | 01:54

I used my FM Transmitter to "tag" a Christian radio station with Classical Music.

Mozart2_small

Classical music station KFUO in St. Louis was one of the oldest radio stations west of the Mississippi. The stationed was owned by the Lutheran church up until last year when it was purchased by Gateway Creative Broadcasting’s JOY-FM. On July 6th, 2010 KFUO broadcasted Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 in D minor and then went silent. The following morning JOY-FM began it’s broadcast of Christian contemporary pop music. There are now six christian stations in St. Louis and zero classical stations.

On Saturday December 3rd, I powered up the 40-watt FM transmitter I built and “tagged” a Christian station (89.5 FM) with Mozart’s Requiem in D Minor K. 626: Sanctus. For a couple square miles at least, you can hear classical music on the radio again coming from high atop the chimney of a former convent.

This is a recording of the moment my signal went live.

Dear Father

From Youth Media Project | 02:40

Gabriel Martinez, a seventh grader, wrote this thoughtful and moving letter to his unknown father.

2907198746_f076efdd17_z_small Gabriel Martinez, a seventh grader, wrote this thoughtful and moving letter to his unknown father.

First Love and 27 Other Firsts

From Whitney Jones | 01:30

This is the story of my first love and the many other firsts that came along with it.

2011__2700_-_version_4_small This is the story of my first love and the many other firsts that came along with it.

The Kindness of Strangers

From Kirsty McQuire | 06:15

One woman's philanthropic mission comes full circle.

Kindness_4th-sept-2011_small During the leap year of 2012, Bernadette Russell embarked on a mission to complete 366 Days of Kindness. Her efforts were prompted by the riots that spread through her adopted home town of London and across English towns and cities, between 6th and 10th August 2011.

Bernadette has left sweets in phone boxes, books on trains, £5 notes on buses. She has given away balloons, cakes, flowers and lottery tickets, written letters to a soldier returned from Afghanistan and offered her socks to the homeless. She practiced ‘targeted’ rather than ‘random’ acts of kindness but she says she ‘expected nothing in return.’

Bernadette is now turning her 366 philanthropic experiences into a stage play, in collaboration with Jacksons Lane Theatre in London and with support from Birmingham Rep and Forkbeard Fantasy.


Underground Trade Part 8: What Now?

From WGBH Radio Boston | Part of the Underground Trade: From Boston to Bangkok series | 08:20

Individuals can take heroic steps to stop human trafficking, like the cab driver in Saigon who rescued 11- and 12-year-olds enslaved in garment factories.

8-_mg_4881_small There are no simple solutions to stamping out human trafficking, but thousands of people and organizations worldwide are trying.  From the cab driver in Saigon who uses his own money to rescue exploited kids to a cop in Boston who works overtime and with few resources to assist exploited women.  In his final report in our serties "Underground Trade" investigative reporter Phillip Martin looks at individuals and institutions that are working to end what some view as modern-day slavery. In our final report we hear from activists and law enforcement officals in Saigon, Chiang Mai, New York, San Francisco, Boston and elsewhere.    

Coming of Age in the Era of Oscar Grant and Trayvon Martin

From Youth Radio | 04:39

Youth Radio's Myles Bess came of age in-between the shootings of Oscar Grant and Trayvon Martin. He asks other black men in Oakland for advice on how to deal with the violence directed against them.

Bess_small

I don't know how I should feel about the George Zimmerman verdict. I was the same age as Trayvon Martin when he was killed. It was the first shooting case that got national attention where I felt connected -- like I could relate. When I first heard the story, it seemed clear: Trayvon Martin was young and he was murdered. I thought it would be an open and shut case. As time progressed, it changed. The more information came out, the more complicated the case became. And then the verdict was announced. I wasn’t surprised. But I was emotionless. Should I be angry? Should I be sad? I felt like goop. No shape. No structure.

I decided to go to Arnold Perkins, someone with deep roots in Oakland and the civil rights movement who is a mentor to black youth like me, hoping he could help me understand my feelings. He’s a former member of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. He was also head of the Alameda County Public Health department.

I turned to Perkins because I honestly felt lost.

"Part of the lostness (is my generation.) So what has happened is that...I knew the way and walked away and left you. Or I'm lost and you followed me," Perkins told me. "We act as if...the situation our young people are in is of their making. It's of the making of our generation. I came through the civil rights movement. We thought we were free through integration and then we set out to 'get mines.' I got mine and left you behind. And that's what we're suffering from now. We walked away from your generation."

I see another side to that. I wonder if it’s not just that the older generation walked away, it’s that the younger generation -- my generation -- didn’t step up to replace those civil rights leaders in the community.

So when something big happens, we don’t know how to respond.

And things keep happening.

I was 14 when 22-year-old Oscar Grant was shot and killed on a subway platform in Oakland.

In a lot of ways, the full significance went over my head. Now, I really get it in light of Trayvon Martin’s death. This kind of thing happens to people like me daily. My family has been telling me this since childhood, but now it has greater meaning.

I grew up in a neighborhood where on my block it was fine, but a few blocks over, it was more transitional.

As a fourth grader, every time I went outside -- whether I was going to school or hanging out with friends -- my Granny and my Mom would always tell me to be careful, and to look out for myself. As I entered middle school, their directions got more specific; “Myles make sure when you walk home you change your route, you never know who’s watching.” Up until that point, I thought they were just being overprotective, but now as an 18 year old I realize they weren’t worried so much about me. They were concerned about those around me and how they would perceive me. As a young black man, I’ll always have this cloud following me evoking fear, hate, and sometimes empathy. At 71 years old, Arnold Perkins is still living with that cloud. And it angers him.

"Racism has never rested," said Perkins. "There's a string, a history of it going on from the time of slavery through now. Nothing has changed. You can take Oscar Grant, you can take Emmett Till, you can take Trayvon Martin, you can take them all. It's the same pattern that goes on where people are afraid of us. I as an African American male walking down the street. A 71 year old African American male. We have to deal with that."

It's the harsh reality. And the court system -- even after we're gone -- won't often look out for us. I asked 26 year old Pendarvis Harshaw: Why?

"Great question. Why? The potential that brews in you as an 18-year-old understanding this, and having the energy to do something, but not having the actual vision or direction to do so. There's the potential for mass creation or destruction," said Harshaw.

That’s why what’s next is really important. I don’t want to shrug my shoulders and say ‘what can you do’? At any other time, there were obvious leaders, and obvious movements I could have gone to for answers. As I get older, I realize that stories like Trayvon Martin’s were always close to home, I just had to grow up to understand how they relate to me.

My Grannie’s warnings have a deeper meaning now. They weren’t just about rules -- like looking both ways before I cross the street or not talking to strangers. She was telling me...I’m a target.

The Poison Squad: A Chemist’s Quest for Pure Food

From Sruthi Pinnamaneni | 08:03

Meet Harvey Washington Wiley, the mastermind behind this experiment where young government employees were fed poison-laced foods months on end. He's also the founding father of the Food and Drug Administration.

Prx_1_small In the winter of 1902, twelve robust, young men in suits gather in the basement of a government building in Washington DC.  Waiters serve them dinner prepared by chefs, courses like chipped beef and applesauce, served on fine china. The room and board is free.  The men eat what is served, though they know each course has been spiked with a dose of some unnamed poison.  They do this every day, three square meals a day, for the next six months.

The press named the group of men the “Poison Squad.”  Harvey Washington Wiley, the chemist who conceived this experiment, would go on to become the founding father of the FDA and the "Watchdog of America's Kitchens". A moral man, his heart with filled with righteous anger when confronted with tomatoes preserved in salicylic acid and eggs sprayed with formaldehyde.  His fight for "pure food" would span three vigorous decades, and he would take on tough opponents like Coca Cola or sodium benzoate, losing more often than he won.

This short radio documentary tells the story of Wiley and a colorful human experiment--one that began in a basement dining room and continues on our dinner plates today.

Editor and engineer: Brendan Baker

Spare the Rock, Spoil the Child (Series)

Produced by Bill Childs

Most recent piece in this series:

2015-08-01 Spare the Rock, Spoil the Child

From Bill Childs | Part of the Spare the Rock, Spoil the Child series | 53:16

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1st set
They Might Be Giants - It’s Spare the Rock
ID
They Might Be Giants - Ten Mississippi
Randy Kaplan - Loquat Rooftop
ID
Red Yarn - Mr. Rabbit (Scottish Rite 8/15)
Mil’s Trills - Say Hey! (new)
ID
Michael Franti & Spearhead - Once a Day (new)
[KUTX/WJFF/KCMJ - The Deedle Deedle Dees - Birds of America Don’t Care-Oh]
2nd set
Bill Withers - Lovely Day
ID/prep to Rock (CARL)
TMBG - Don’t Spare the Rock!
ID
Rainbow Beast - Happy Clouds
Lunch Money - Tiny Dinosaurs
Ramones - Do You Remember Rock & Roll Radio
Mr. Leebot & the Boogers - (Having a Blast) At the Pool
ID
[KUTX - Sweet Honey in the Rock - I Got Shoes]
[WJFF/KCMJ - Justin Roberts - Dad Caught Stars]
3rd set
Tegan & Sara - Everything is Awesome
Brick Fiesta Interview
Recess Monkey - Brick by Brick
ID
Luscious Jackson - Yeah Yeah No No
Royal Order of Chords & Keys - Cookies & Milk
Ratboy Jr. - Banana Stand
ID
They Might Be Giants - 813 Mile Car Trip
They Might Be Giants - Spare the Rock

Rewired

From The Heart | Part of the Tender Moments series | 04:31

Trish McEvoy is a woman in her 40s who just traded in her job at the bank for a position as a booker at an escort agency. She tells us about being wooed by a very special man at a department store and how it changed her life.

Playing
Rewired
From
The Heart

Audio_smut_square_logo_600x600-white_on_grey_small Trish dated a paraplegic man for several years. She was inspired by his ability to adapt to his limited sense of touch below the waist. This man's comfort in his own skin was a rarity. Trish learned over the years that people with physical disabilities face great challenges in the intimacy department. Most physical therapy and medical support programs neglect this area. What she found especially frustrating, was that paid escorts often refuse service to people with disabilities.

She decided she wanted to do something about this. So after years of batting around ideas, she started a business to accomodate people with physical disabilities called "Sensual Solutions".

While Audio Smut's "Tender Moments" are in full compliance with FCC regulations, they do openly engage with the topic of sexuality and gender.

The Origins of Rhythm

From Paolo Pietropaolo | 05:53

Without Shiva's dance of destruction and Parvati's dance of seduction, we might be living in a world without drums. A meditation on the origins of rhythm, through the voice of the great Ustad Zakir Hussain, with original music by Paolo Pietropaolo.

Tabla_small In this mini-doc, tabla maestro Zakir Hussain tells the Hindu story of the origins of rhythm, along with reflections from filmmaker Deepa Mehta and choreographer Shiamak Davar on the essential rhythmic nature of the Indian people; all set to original music and sound design by Paolo Pietropaolo.

Commissioned by BoulderPavement.ca, an online literary arts journal published by The Banff Centre.

secret kitty

From Nate DiMeo | Part of the the memory palace series | 03:43

in which the CIA enlists a kitty cat as a listening device in its fight against the Soviets. The plan fails. It really, really fails.

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secret kitty
From
Nate DiMeo

Secret_kitty_240_small This is an episode of the memory palace podcast.  Listen to the whole series at www.thememorypalace.us

Each episode is a short (between 1:30 and 6:00) water-coolery story of the past, with an emphasis on American History.   

Walking Across America ~ Advice for a Young Man

From Atlantic Public Media | Part of the The Transom Radio Specials series | 53:57

Andrew Forsthoefel set out at age 23 to walk across America, East to West, 4000 miles, with a sign on him that said, "Walking to Listen". This hour, co-produced with Jay Allison, tracks his epic journey. It's a coming of age story, and a portrait of this country - big-hearted, wild, innocent, and wise.

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From Andrew Forsthoefel:

I decided to walk across the country for several reasons. Producing an hour-long radio essay about it was not one of them. When I left home, I had no idea what would become of the tape I hoped to record.

At the beginning of the walk, I thought it would be a good idea to have a focus question for the interviews. The question was about transformation. What does it mean to you and when have you experienced it? I was at a transformative time in my own life, so that question seemed right.

I quickly abandoned the idea, though. It seemed too contrived or constraining. Instead, I just started talking to people about their lives and, sometimes, what their lives had taught them. I’d ask people about the idea of home, aloneness, family, love, death; all sorts of stuff.

I thought people would be resistant to being interviewed. Not so. The vast majority wanted to be heard, and they didn’t mind the recorder. Nearly every time, they had something they wanted to share.  I was wearing a sign that said “Walking to Listen,” and there was no shortage of people to listen to.

Support for this work comes from National Endowment for the Arts and the Transom Donor Fund:


                                                 

Generation Putin - Hour Special

From Seattle Globalist | Part of the Generation Putin series | 59:01

"Generation Putin" is an hourlong special on young people and politics in the former Soviet Union. Embeddable on SoundCloud, too.

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It's been over 20 years since the collapse of the Soviet Union.

Young people in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan and Georgia are facing unemployment, democratic pressure, and the legacy of repression, while being influenced by the West, punk music, and the Pussy Riot trials. PRX sent a reporting team from the Seattle Globalist to explore the tensions in these countries, described by The Atlantic as 'uneasily suspended' between two political eras.

Join host Brooke Gladstone for Generation Putin, an in-depth look at the millennial generation in the post-Soviet states. Embed, stream and share the special and segments on SoundCloud.

Rodriguez: Searching For Sugar Man

From Joyride Media | 59:00

Rodriguez was a music legend in South Africa, but it took 25 years for him to find out.

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When Sixto Rodriguez emerged from Detroit in the early 70’s, he made two albums that didn’t catch the ears of the public in the United States.  But in South Africa, Rodriguez became a household name – up there with Bob Dylan and Elvis Presley.  South Africans didn’t know much about his life, but it was as accepted rumor that he had committed suicide.  25 years later, a couple of fans decided to search for information, and they discovered their hero alive and well – doing manual labor and completely unaware of his impact and success half a world away.
 
In this one hour radio special, you’ll hear from the producers of his records, the people who found him and the director of a documentary about how it all happened, and from Rodriguez himself. 

The School that Had No Water: Water Security in South Africa

From Terrascope Radio | Part of the Terrascope Radio Major Features series | 19:41

What would you do if you were headmistress of a school with no water--none for drinking, none for cleaning, none for flushing, none? Here is the story of one such headmistress, and of the poor South African district whose children her school serves. We hear how she took action to solve the school's water crisis, and we learn how water security is intertwined with education, poverty, politics and history. Available in two versions, with credits (19:41) and without (17:26).

Schoolpicstandley_small Water security is about a lot more than just water--it's about education, politics, poverty and history. Follow this group of young producers as they hear from a headmistress who found that her school's water infrastructure had collapsed completely. In her story they find also the story of the Missionvale Township, the struggle against Apartheid and the warm, enveloping culture of South Africa. Available in two versions, with credits (19:41) and without (17:26).

Jews & Blues: Inside Out

From Inside Out Documentaries | 01:02:30

The story of how Jewish and African-American music came to be mingled is the story of how the soundtrack of the American Century came to be written

Jb_small WBUR's Inside Out Documentaries Senior Correspondent Michael Goldfarb tells a story of relations between African-American and Jewish communities through the history of American popular music of the first half of the 20th century. In "Jews and Blues: Inside Out" Goldfarb takes us on a journey through ragtime, blues, jazz, klezmer and popular song to see how and where the musical and social connections were made. While listening to the music of Scott Joplin and Irving Berlin, George Gershwin and Duke Ellington, Goldfarb traces the lines of musical influence. He takes us to the places where the music played and the musicians met to see how the intertwining of musical expression between Jews and African-Americans reflected-and sometimes helped initiate-social change. The program includes rarely heard performances from Willie the Lion Smith, George Gershwin, Cab Calloway, the Original Dixieland Jazz Band and Artie Shaw, among others. PRSS satellite uplink 8/01 "Jews & Blues: Inside Out" may be considered "evergreen." Michael Goldfarb's book , "Ahmad's War, Ahmad's Peace," published by Carroll & Graf, is out now: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0786715154/002-7566354-8354437?v=glance For more information about this and other Inside Out Documentaries, please contact Namita Raina, National Program Administrator, WBUR Boston. (617) 353-8160 nraina@bu.edu

The Great Migration that Changed America - Isabel Wilkerson

From Open Source with Christopher Lydon | 59:59

Isabel Wilkerson is the epic tale teller of the Great Migration of Southern black people that remade America — sound, substance and spirit — in the 20th Century. Her book is The Warmth of Other Suns.

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Isabel Wilkerson is the epic tale teller of the Great Migration of Southern black people that remade America — sound, substance and spirit — in the 20th Century. The proof is in the soundtrack — musical highlights of a comprehensive revolution. It was one of two modern migrations, it’s been said, that made American culture what it is — of blacks from the Jim Crow South, and of Jews from Central and Eastern Europe.

The movement of masses is an ageless, ongoing piece of human history. But was there ever a migration that beyond moving people transformed a national culture as ours did? Songs, games, language, art, style, worship, every kind of entertainment including pro sports — in fact almost all we feel about ourselves, how we look to the world, changed in the sweep of Isabel Wilkerson’s magnificent story, the Warmth of Other Suns. 

Guns, Mental Illness and Addiction

From Tim Lineaweaver | 03:55

A first person account of overcoming the urge for violence.

NB: The content of this essay is intense - addressing subjects of a sensitive nature.

Gun_bed_small Tim Lineaweaver, a psychotherapist from Massachusetts, reflects on a painful personal history, and what it has taken him to confront and overcome violence.  Lineaweaver counsels clients suffering from addictions and trauma. 

Not Your Mother's French Music!

From Charles Spira | 53:11

We invite you to listen to 17 among the most exciting French Popular Music songs released since 2012. Open a bottle of your favorite wine, Sit back, relax and enjoy!

Joy_of_french_popular_music_small We have selected the most exciting and engaging recent French Language Songs and bring them to you with a short introduction in English.  The program has been split into three segments to allow for Station identification breaks and other announcements.  Here is the lineup:
Segment1
Stromae,(Belgium),Formidable
Amandine Bourgeois,(France),Envie d'Un Manque de Problemes
Daguerre,(France),Carmen
Celine Dion,(Canada),Moi Quand Je Pleure
IAM,(France),L'Amour Qu'on Me donne
La Grande Sophie,(France),Sucrer les Fraises
Segment2
David Parienti,(France),Rien Au-dessus de Nous
Juliette Noureddine,(France),La Petite Robe Noire
Tristan Nihouarn,(France),Des Merveilles
Anouk Aiata,(France),Errer
Detroit,(France), Droit dans le Soleil
Circus,(France),Amour Suicide
Segment3
Babx,(France),Suzanne aux Yeux Noirs
Barbara Carlotti,(France),J'ai Change
Ycare,(France),Avenue
Daphne,(France),Rocambolesque Morocco
Elephant,(France),Collective Mon Amour 

Adhémar and Jacobi and the Missing Model Locomotive.

From Charles Spira | 26:48

Adhémar (a small lion) and Jacobi (a little monkey) travel from the jungle in the Democratic Republic of Congo to Europe to recover a vintage model locomotive that disappeared from the home of a little boy in Paris.

Adhemar_jacobi_lionel_model_2025_small Adhémar (a small lion) and Jacobi (a little monkey) travel to Paris from the Democratic Republic of Congo to help Inspector Rocard from the Quai d'Orsay recover the beloved vintage model 2025 steam engine that disappeared from the home of little Alain Jospin. They are hot on the trail of a dishonest Central European model train dealer, Zoltan Gromek, and follow him to Antwerp, Belgium. This colorful, fast-paced story, will delight young listeners and open their minds to the world.