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Playlist: john coltrane and others

Compiled By: wilson seaborn

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Ella Fitzgerald, 'First Lady of Song'

From NPR Music | Part of the Jazz Profiles series | 54:00

Her voice is instantly recognizable. Her youthful exuberance, pure sound and positive energy just make you feel good. Her incredible technical abilities were self-evident, but when she sang, she radiated a joy consistent with her own character both on and off the bandstand.

Ella---trey250_small Her voice is instantly recognizable. Her youthful exuberance, pure sound and positive energy just make you feel good. Her incredible technical abilities were self-evident, but when she sang, she radiated a joy consistent with her own character both on and off the bandstand.

Bobby Hutcherson Tribute

From NPR Music | Part of the Jazz Profiles series | 53:45

A tribute to vibraphonist Bobby Hutcherson. Please note there is no mention of his passing in this program.

Hutcherson_sq_small A tribute to vibraphonist Bobby Hutcherson. Please note there is no mention of his passing in this program.

Art Tatum, 'The Musician's Musician'

From NPR Music | Part of the Jazz Profiles series | 58:00

One of the greatest improvisers in jazz history, Art Tatum also set the standard for technical dexterity with his classic 1933 recording of "Tea for Two."

Jp_tatum250_small One of the greatest improvisers in jazz history, Art Tatum also set the standard for technical dexterity with his classic 1933 recording of "Tea for Two." Nearly blind, Tatum had artistic vision and ability that made him an icon of jazz piano, a musician whose impact will be felt for generations to come.

Miles Davis, Part 1: Miles' Styles

From NPR Music | Part of the Jazz Profiles series | 54:00

Miles Davis was the personification of restless spirit, always pushing himself and his music into uncharted territory.

Miles_styles_color250_small Miles Davis was the personification of restless spirit, always pushing himself and his music into uncharted territory. He was an innovative lightning rod for musicians from all genres — particularly the brightest young players. Davis created some of the 20th century's most challenging and influential music.

Miles Davis, Part 2: 'Kind of Blue'

From NPR Music | Part of the Jazz Profiles series | 54:00

The best-selling jazz record of all time is a universally acknowledged masterpiece, revered as much by rock and classical music fans as by jazz lovers. The album is Miles Davis' Kind of Blue.

Miles_styles250_small

Kind of Blue brought together seven now-legendary musicians in the prime of their careers: tenor saxophonist John Coltrane, alto saxophonist Julian "Cannonball" Adderley, pianists Bill Evans and Wynton Kelly, bassist Paul Chambers, drummer Jimmy Cobb and, of course, trumpeter Miles Davis.

Johnny Hartman, 'The Romantic Balladeer'

From NPR Music | Part of the Jazz Profiles series | 54:00

Johnny Hartman was the quintessential romantic balladeer. The only singer to record with John Coltrane — on the iconic album John Coltrane & Johnny Hartman — his fame was limited mainly to true jazz lovers during his lifetime.

Hartman200_small Johnny Hartman was the quintessential romantic balladeer. The only singer to record with John Coltrane — on the iconic album John Coltrane & Johnny Hartman — his fame was limited mainly to true jazz lovers during his lifetime.

Sidney Bechet, 'Soprano Sax King'

From NPR Music | Part of the Jazz Profiles series | 54:00

Sidney Bechet was the undisputed king of the soprano saxophone and also one of the most innovative and original clarinetists in jazz.

Bechet250_small Sidney Bechet was the undisputed king of the soprano saxophone and also one of the most innovative and original clarinetists in jazz. He brought an unequaled energy, clarity and verve to his chosen instruments, along with his trademark heavy vibrato.

Mary Lou Williams, 'Perpetually Contemporary'

From NPR Music | Part of the Jazz Profiles series | 54:31

Mary Lou Williams was not only present for nearly every development in jazz music -- she was influential to most of them. In her compositions, arrangements, piano playing, and teaching, she constantly advanced jazz music.

Marylou_small

Composer, arranger and pianist Mary Lou Williams achieved and maintained a status that many women in jazz found elusive: unwavering respect from male colleagues who regarded her as a musical equal.

 

Louis Armstrong: 'The Man and His Music,' Part 1

From NPR Music | Part of the Jazz Profiles series | 54:00

It is hard to overstate the incredible reach of Louis Armstrong. The music he made touched everyone who heard it, and revolutionized American entertainment in ways we can still hear today.

1armstrong250_small

It is hard to overstate the incredible reach of Louis Armstrong. The music he made touched everyone who heard it, and revolutionized American entertainment in ways we can still hear today.

He did it with the force of his talent: as a singer, trumpeter, composer, author, actor and bandleader. His virtuosity remains unparalleled, his innovative importance unmatched. And he transcended racial barriers to become an American ambassador to the world.

Louis Armstrong: 'The Man and His Music,' Part 2

From NPR Music | Part of the Jazz Profiles series | 54:00

By his early thirties, Louis Armstrong had already revolutionized jazz forever. Working with his mentor "King" Oliver in Chicago, Armstrong explored and expanded the sounds of his native New Orleans.

2armstrong200_small By his early thirties, Louis Armstrong had already revolutionized jazz forever. Working with his mentor "King" Oliver in Chicago, Armstrong explored and expanded the sounds of his native New Orleans. He developed his improvisational genius with Fletcher Henderson's orchestra in New York, then returned to Chicago already billed as "The World's Greatest Trumpet Player," and recorded the legendary Hot Fives sessions.

Louis Armstrong: 'The Trumpeter'

From NPR Music | Part of the Jazz Profiles series | 54:00

Before Louis Armstrong ever sang a duet with Ella Fitzgerald or Bing Crosby, there was just a lanky young man with a bright, beautiful horn. That young man transformed the trumpet into a solo instrument capable of astonishing range and lyrical beauty.

3armstrong250_small Before Louis Armstrong ever sang a duet with Ella Fitzgerald or Bing Crosby, before "Hello Dolly" or "It's A Wonderful World," there was just a lanky young man with a bright, beautiful horn. That young man transformed the trumpet into a solo instrument capable of astonishing range and lyrical beauty.

Jazz: The '59 Sound

From Joyride Media | 59:00

Exploration of some of the enduring jazz recordings of 1959.

Jazz59_small New one-hour radio special salutes the 50th anniversary of the landmark albums by Miles Davis (Kind of Blue, Sketches of Spain), Charles Mingus (Mingus Ah-Um), Dave Brubeck (Time Out) and others that helped make 1959 Jazz’s greatest year.

Spotlight: Miles Davis Vol. 1

From Howard Burchette | Part of the Jazz Time series | 01:00:02

This is a one hour special history and music of Jazz legend "Miles Davis", hosted by Howard Burchette.

Miles_davis_small

Miles Dewey Davis III (May 26, 1926 – September 28, 1991) was a Jazz icon and a musical genius. Many considered him as one of the most influential musicians of the 20th century

Miles Davis was responsible for changing the face of Jazz music three or four times, including bebop, cool Jazz, Jazz fusion and a mixture Jazz and hip-hop.

Many great Jazz musicians known today rose to prominence as members of Davis' ensembles, including saxophonists Gerry Mulligan, John Coltrane, Cannonball Adderley, George Coleman, Wayne Shorter, Dave Liebman, Branford Marsalis and Kenny Garrett; trombonist J. J. Johnson; pianists Horace Silver, Red Garland, Wynton Kelly, Bill Evans, Herbie Hancock, Joe Zawinul, Chick Corea, and Keith Jarrett; guitarists John McLaughlin, John Scofield and Mike Stern; bassists Paul Chambers, Ron Carter, Dave Holland, Marcus Miller and Darryl Jones; and drummers Philly Joe Jones, Jimmy Cobb, Tony Williams, Billy Cobham, Jack DeJohnette, and Al Foster.

His album Kind of Blue, released in 1959, is the greatest selling Jazz album in history.

Blue Dimensions F27: Traveling many "Miles" with the SF Jazz Collective

From Bluesnet Radio | Part of the Blue Dimensions series | 59:00

SF Jazz Collective plays the music of Miles Davis

Sfjazz_small In this hour of Blue Dimensions, we have Miles to travel, as in Miles Davis, with a new album called Music Of Miles Davis And Original Compositions from the SF Jazz Collective. The SF jazz Collective is the performing front-end of the organization SF Jazz, which has made San Francisco very jazz-friendly for over a decade now. This superb band includes Miguel Zenón on alto saxophone, David Sánchez on tenor saxophone, Sean Jones on trumpet, Robin Eubanks on trombone, Warren Wolf on vibraphone, Edward Simon on piano, Matt Penman on bass, and Obed Calvaire on drums. We'll hear several Miles Davis pieces from the SF Jazz Collective, along with music from Miles himself, both a standard and one of his fusion pieces, and a Davis composition from a West African group, The Kora Jazz Band, adapting one of Davis's classics to West African rhythms and the west African instrument known as the kora, and featuring Manu Dibango, world-renowned for his saxophone work, on marimba (where he also shines!).

promo included: promo-F27

NEA Jazz Master Jimmy Cobb Remembering Making the Kind of Blue Album

From National Endowment for the Arts | Part of the Jazz Masters Moments series | 01:30

NEA Jazz Master Jimmy Cobb remembers being in the amazing Miles Davis Band.

Newjazzlogo_small NEA JAZZ MASTER JIMMY COBB IS THE LAST REMAINING MEMBER OF THE GREAT MILES DAVIS BAND THAT PRODUCED KIND OF BLUE – ONE OF THE BEST SELLING ALBUMS IN JAZZ HISTORY.  COBB REMEMBERS THAT THE BAND RECORDED ALMOST EVERY TUNE IN JUST ONE TAKE, WITHOUT ANY REHEARSALS.

The Jazz-O-Rama Hour #57: More Hard Bop, Vocalese and a little bit of Ballad

From Joe Bevilacqua | Part of the The Jazz-O-Rama Hour series | 58:50

An hour of classic jazz, hosted by Joe Bev

060-jazz-o-rama--prx-series-morehardbob_small Host Joe Bev plays:

  1. Joe's Delight - Philly Joe Jones Septet
  2. Minor Mishap - Tommy Flanagan with John Coltrane and Kenny Burrell
  3. Sweet 'n' Sour - Art Blakey & The Jazz Messengers
  4. The Two Lonely People - Bill Evans
  5. Prince Of Darkness - Miles Davis Quintet
  6. Woody'n You - Barry Harris Trio
  7. Farmer's Market - Art Farmer Quintet
  8. Farmer's Market - Lambert, Hendricks and Ross
  9. Dat Dere - Cannonball Adderley
  10. Dat Dere - Oscar Brown Jr.
  11. I Want to Talk About You - John Coltrane 
 

NEA Jazz Master Jimmy Cobb On Recording Porgy and Bess

From National Endowment for the Arts | Part of the Jazz Masters Moments series | 01:30

NEA Jazz Master Jimmy Cobb lucked into recording Porgy and Bess.

Newjazzlogo_small IN 1958, NEA JAZZ MASTER JIMMY COBB LUCKED INTO A RECORDING DATE THAT HAS GONE DOWN IN THE ANNALS OF JAZZ HISTORY.  IT WAS WITH A BAND HE’D FOLLOWED RELIGIOUSLY – LED BY TRUMPETER MILES DAVIS, WITH SAXOPHONIST CANNONBALL ADDERLY AND DRUMMER PHILLY JOE JONES, AMONG OTHERS.

Blues File: Story Of A Song: Afro Blue

From WXPN | Part of the Blues File series | 04:31

A look at "Afro Blue" in its many incarnations over the decades

Santamaria_small Cuban percussionist Mongo Santamaria's "Afro Blue" has challenged & fascinated musicians for decades. John Coltrane did a number of versions of it, including a 38-minute performance in Japan in 1966. Oscar Brown, Jr. accomplished the daunting task of writing lyrics for it that captured and enhanced its alluring quality. Distinctive vocalist Abbey Lincoln recorded Brown's version on her album "Abbey Is Blue" in 1959. With and without lyrics, Afro Blue has been covered by musicians as diverse as Tito Puente and Derek Trucks, and each new version seems to offer a fresh vision of this remarkable Afro-Cuban composition.

Blues File: Koko Taylor - Remembrance

From WXPN | Part of the Blues File series | 06:00

A remembrance of the late Koko Taylor. Career review includes her rare first recording.

Koko_small Koko Taylor has died at age 80. Cora Walton grew up in Shelby County TN near Memphis and was known as Koko because of her fondness for chocolate. (early in her career it was spelled "Cocoa" but morphed into "Koko" in the early 60's). She had arrived in the windy city in her late teens. She and husband Robert "Pops" Taylor had only pocket change and a box of crackers and took whatever work they could find. Her first record was recorded without her knowledge that it was being recorded in 1961. The year after she received $25 in royalties for it. Koko hit the Chicago blues clubs in the early 1960s and met Willie Dixon who worked with her on the USA label for her first real record, Honky Tonk in 1963. Koko then went with Dixon to Chess and cut "I Got What It Takes". In 1965 she recorded her biggest hit "Wang Dang Doodle" for Chess; it was the label's last major blues hit. After "Wang Dang Doodle" Chess Records slipped and Koko's career with it. She recorded in Europe for The Black & Blue label in 1973 during what might be called The Eclipse Of The Blues in the States. In 1975, Koko signed with the fledgling blues label Alligator. Her first album was called "I Got What It Takes" -- which had been her first song for Chess years before. Taylor's and Alligator's fortunes slowly rose together. Chicago blues was reviving and growing. Koko Taylor was singing it like no one else. By the mid-80's she was called "Queen Of The Blues" and no one disputed the claim. In this century she has battled severe health problems. Her last album "Old School" came out in 2007 after a seven-year absence from the studio, but it was fresh with vocal power, and a few of her own songs such as "Piece Of Man." Koko's magnitude as a blues singer is beyond measure.

UpFront Soul #2016.07 - Black History Month - February 15-21, 2016

From WERU | Part of the UpFront Soul with Sanguine Fromage series | 01:57:59

As we celebrate Black History Month, we feature funk, soul, and jazz designed to inspire and empower from Nina Simone, Roberta Flack, and Gil Scott-Heron, interspersed with the voices of civil rights activists Fannie Lou Hamer, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and many more.

Roberta_flack_small As we celebrate Black History Month, we feature funk, soul, and jazz designed to inspire and empower from Nina Simone, Roberta Flack, and Gil Scott-Heron, interspersed with the voices of civil rights activists Fannie Lou Hamer, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and many more. UpFront Soul #2016.07 Playlist
Hour 1
Joan Armatrading "Back to the Night" from "Back to the Night" on A&M
 Nina Simone "To Be Young, Gifted And Black" from "The Essential Nina Simone" on RCA
 Nancy Dupree "What Do I Have?" from "Ghetto Reality" on Smithsonian Folkways
 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr "Where Do We Go From Here? (August 16 1967)" from "The Anthology 1957-1968" on Words of Wisdom
 The Temptations "Message from a Black Man" from "Discoveries"
 Roberta Flack "Go Up Moses" from "Quiet Fire" on Atlantic
 Nat Turner Rebellion "Tribute to a Slave" from "Tribute to a Slave" on Delvalliant
 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr "Where Do We Go From Here? (August 16 1967) Excerpt" from "The Anthology 1957-1968" on Words of Wisdom
 Kim Weston "Lift Ev'ry Voice and Sing" from "Black Power: Music of a Revolution Disc 2" on shout! factory
 Ben Branch and The Operation Breadbasket Orchestra "Hard Times" from "The Last Request" on Chess
 Unknown "In The Mess (excerpt)" from "Movement Soul" on ESP Disc
 Unknown "Want My Freedom" from "Movement Soul" on ESP Disc
 Core Freedom Singers "Get Your Rights, Jack" from "Voices of the civil rights movement: Black freedom songs 1960-1966" on Smithsonian Folkways
 Oscar Brown Jr. "40 Acres and a Mule" from "Oscar Brown Jr Goes to Washington Live at the Cellar Door" on Fontana
 Unknown "In The Mess (excerpt)" from "Movement Soul" on ESP Disc
 Gil Scott-Heron "Black History/ The World" from "Moving Target" on Arista
Hour 2
 Curtis Mayfield "Wild and Free" from "Curtis" on REPLACE? Alabama?
 Freedom Singers "Freedom Medley--Freedom Chant--Oh Freedom--This Little Light of Mine" from "Voices of the Civil Rights Movement: Black American Freedom Songs 1960-1966"
 Fannie Lou Hamer "The Day of Registration (Speaker)" from "Movement Soul Vol. 2"
 Richard "Groove" Holmes "Soul Power" from "Soul Goes Psychedelic"
 Nerukhi "Black Lives Matter" from "http://movementunes.com/NERUKHI/"
 Syl Johnson "Is It Because I'm Black?" from "The Complete Twinight Singles" on Numero
 Kathleen Cleaver "Change It" from "Black Power: Music of a Revolution Disc 1"
 Intelligent Hoodlum "Black and Proud" from "Say It Loud: Celebrate Black History Month + Martin Luther King Jr Day"
 Roy Ayers "Black Family" from "Drive"
 Unknown "We Need You Here" from "Movement Soul" on ESP Disc
 The Commodores "Rise Up" from "Blame It on the Dogg: A Southern Blues & Soul Compilation Vol. 2"
 John Coltrane "Alabama" from "Essential Jazz Masters" on Stardust
 The La Mont Zeno Theatre "Afrika's My Home" from "Black Fairy" on Athens of the North
 Rasheed Ali "Black Power Revolution" from "1968: Soul Power!" on Digital Rain Factory
 Mickey & The Soul Generation "Message from a Black Man" from "Iron Leg: The Complete Mickey And The Soul Generation"
 Sam Cooke "Havin' a Party" from "Live at the Harlem Square Club" on 1985

UpFront Soul #2017.16 -Poetry Month Special - April 17-23, 2017

From WERU | Part of the UpFront Soul with Sanguine Fromage series | 01:57:59

We'll hear poets- many from the Harlem Renaissance and Black Arts Movements- reading their work, along with poetry set to music, and hip-hop. We'll hear from Nikki Giovanni, Touissant St. Negritude, Langston Hughes, Gil Scott-Heron, and many more!

Toussaint_st_negritude_small We'll hear poets- many from the Harlem Renaissance and Black Arts Movements- reading their work, along with poetry set to music, and hip-hop. We'll hear from Nikki Giovanni, Touissant St. Negritude, Langston Hughes, Gil Scott-Heron, and many more!

UpFront Soul #2017.16 Playlist
Hour 1
Joan Armatrading "Back to the Night" from "Back to the Night" on A&M
 Blackalicious "Ego Tripping by Nikki Giovanni" from "Nia" on Quannum Projects
 Margaret Walker "For My People" from "Anthology of Negro Poets" on Folkways
 Reuben Wilson "Inner City Blues" from "Groove Merchant Super Funk Collection - Return of Jazz Funk"
 The Last Poets with Bernard Purdie "Blessed Are Those Who Struggle" from "Delights of the Garden" on Douglas
 Jerry Moore "Ballad Of Birmingham" from "Ballad Of Birmingham" on ESP
 Claude McKay "If We Must Die" from "Anthology of Negro Poets" on Folkways
 Yusef Lateef "Russell And Eliot" from "Yusef Lateef's Detroit"
 Arrested Development "Freedom" from "Strong"
 Cassandra Wilson "Strange Fruit" from "New Moon Daughter" on Blue Note
 Countee Cullen "Heritage" from "Anthology of Negro Poets" on Folkways
 Miles Davis "Once Upon A Summertime" from "Quiet Nights"
 Maya Angelou "Africa" from "Caged Bird Songs"
 Kim Weston "Lift Ev'ry Voice and Sing" from "Black Power: Music of a Revolution Disc 2" on shout! factory
 Langston Hughes "I Too" from "Anthology of Negro Poets" on Folkways
 Eddie Harris "1974 Blues" from "The Artist's Choice: The Eddie Harris Anthology Disc 1"
 Peabody & Sherman "They've Always Known" from "James Baldwin EP" on Super Bro
 Gil Scott-Heron "Whitey On The Moon" from "The Revolution Begins: The Flying Dutchman Masters" on Ace Records
 Nina Simone "Backlash Blues" from "Forever Young, Gifted And Black: Songs Of Freedom And Spirit" on BMG
 Nikki Giovanni "Beautiful Black Men" from "Legacies: The Poetry of Nikki Giovanni"
 Harlem Underground Band "Fed Up (Instrumental)" from "Harlem Underground Band" on Paul Winley Records
Hour 2
 Sweet Honey In the Rock "On Children" from "LIFT EVERY VOICE! Honoring the African American Musical Legacy" on Cooking Vinyl Records
 Nikki Giovanni & The New York Community Choir "Like a Ripple on a Pond" from "Like a Ripple on a Pond" on Collectibles
 Touissant St. Negritude "All Green Lights" from "All Green Lights"
 Grandmaster Flash & the Furious Five "I Am Somebody" from "Ba Dop Boom Bang" on Elektra
 Oscar Brown Jr "40 Acres and a Mule" from "Oscar Brown Jr Goes To Washington"
 Rita Dove "Parsley" from "100 Great Poems - Classic Poets & Beatnik Freaks"
 Horace Silver "Doodlin'" from "Best Of Horace Silver" on Blue Note
 Jessica Care Moore feat. Roy Ayers "You Want Poems" from "Black Tea: The Legend of Jessi James"
 A Tribe Called Quest "After Hours" from "People's Instinctive Travels and the Paths of Rhythm" on Jive
 Intelligent Hoodlum "Black and Proud" from "Say It Loud: Celebrate Black History Month + Martin Luther King Jr Day"
 Jasmine Mans "Birmingham" from "Striver's Row Presents Selected Poems from the Dean's List Showcases and the Classics"
 Nikki Giovanni "The Rose That Grew From Concrete" from "The Rose That Grew From Concrete"
 Lecrae "Welcome to America" from "Anomaly" on Reach Records
 Sonia Sanchez "When Ure Heart Turns Cold" from "The Rose That Grew From Concrete"
 Brand Nubian "Love Vs. Hate" from "Foundation" on Arista
 Lauryn Hill "Final Hour" from "The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill" on Sony
 Sam Cooke "Havin' a Party" from "Live at the Harlem Square Club" on 1985