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Playlist: Bullying Stories

Compiled By: Public Radio Exchange (PRX)

 Credit: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/37115478@N05/3984710254/">torode</a>
Image by: torode 
Curated Playlist

Youth, parents and adults share their experiences with bullying. From staying true to oneself to reflecting on an attack 20 years ago - these voices offer an uncommon perspective on bullying, one not usually heard in the media.

This list was curated by Generation PRX Director Jones Franzel. Learn more about Generation PRX here.

BULLIED: Teen Stories from Generation PRX

From WNPR | 53:00

Bullying isn’t a new story, but lately, it is all over the news. And while young people are often the targets and the actors in bullying, we rarely get to hear their perspectives in the media. Learn more: generation.prx.org/bullied

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Bullying isn’t a new story, but lately, it is all over the news. And while young people are often the targets and the actors in bullying, we rarely get to hear their perspectives in the media.

Bullied: Teen Stories from Generation PRX is changing that. This hour-long special produced in collaboration with WNPR includes stories from teens with first-hand insight on bullying. From being called "Osama" in a Boston classroom, to looking at whether bullying prevention programs really work in Anchorage, youth producers from around the globe help show us what we don’t we understand – but need to – about bullying. Join teen hosts Council Brandon and Peython Echelson-Russell for an hour of thought-provoking stories, interviews and teen perspectives on bullying.

Bullied: Teen Stories from Generation PRX includes contributions from Blunt Youth Radio Project, ZUMIX Radio, Alaska Teen Media Institute, Hear in the City, Middletown Youth Radio Project and LatitudeNews.com.  It is supported by a grant from the Motorola Mobility Foundation. The show was produced by WNPR, Connecticut Public Radio and presented by PRX, the Public Radio Exchange. Learn more at generation.prx.org/bullied

Fighting Homophobia in the Classroom

From Anny Celsi | 06:06

Teens in Los Angeles use live theater to battle homophobia in the classroom.

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The death of Laurence King – killed by a junior high classmate in Oxnard, California in 2008 – highlights a big problem: If you're a teacher, how should you deal with homophobia in the classroom? One group is using theater to teach teachers how to counteract sexual bias in Southern California classrooms.

The program is put on by Encompass, a non-profit group that focuses on diversity issues in California schools. The actors are students from the LA County High School for the arts.

According to the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network, by the time they get to high school, ninety percent of lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgendered students have experienced physical, verbal or sexual harassment at school. Those students are more likely to skip school out of fear, don’t do as well academically as their straight peers, and are less likely to graduate.

In the training, educators watch a scene where homophobic behavior disrupts a classroom and creates stress.  The observers are given insight into the students' inner lives and how they're affected by sexual bias. They're then asked to come up with techniques the teacher might use to make the classroom safer and more inclusive.  The scene is repeated, with the actors using improv to act out the new strategies.  With the teacher in control, things play out differently this time - the bullies dial back their behavior, the name-calling and hate-speech is squelched, and the students are free to focus on their lesson.

Student actor Drew Cameron says, “hopefully teachers are watching this and thinking, here’s some students that are putting on a scene for us. Here are some students who are showing us how to be better teachers. “

… better teachers in a school where every student feels safe to focus on the job of learning.

Why Do We Get Bullied?

From City High Radio | 03:51

Freshman Kyle W tries to get to the bottom of why people get bullied and why they bully. New and improved version--check it out!

Lauren_bullies_kyle_small Freshman Kyle W tries to get to the bottom of why people get bullied and why they bully. He interviews victims of bullying and one self-proclaimed bully.

Learning to Breathe

From Zoe Sheinkopf | 06:51

A high schooler struggles with changes she sees in herself due to stress.

Default-piece-image-0 A high schooler struggles with changes she sees in herself due to stress.

Support for LGBT youth in Anchorage

From Alaska Teen Media Institute | 05:10

Suicides among LGBT youth have been a major topic in the news the last few months.

Default-piece-image-0 Reporter Michelle Paras with a story about support LGBT youth find in Anchorage, Alaska.

Bullies

From Susan Stone | 04:38

Audio snapshots about being bullied, or being the bully, by a few young men who have paid the price.

Playing
Bullies
From
Susan Stone

Juvenile_hall_intake_small These audio snapshots zero in on what being the bully, or being bullied felt like for 6 youth offenders. "Bullies" comes from an ongoing storytelling series titled "If These Walls Could Talk," featuring recorded readings by incarcerated youth who share their hopes, fears, and life experiences through original poems and essays. 

Through writing and conversation workshops conducted weekly in juvenile halls throughout the western United States,  these young men and women are encouraged to develop literacy, self-expression, and critical thinking skills, with the aim of supporting their progress towards a healthy, non-violent, and productive life after leaving Juvenile Hall.

Dealing with Cyber Bullying

From Radio Rootz | 05:49

Radio Rootz Reporter explores the role schools play when dealing with cyber bullying.

Default-piece-image-2 Radio Rootz Reporter explores the role schools play when dealing with cyber bullying.

BULLYING: K thru LIFE

From Voices of Our World | 27:59

A closer look at bullying in our society.

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BULLYING: K thru LIFE    part 1     From grade school through college and beyond, bullying has been allowed to go way too far, far too often.  The rate of child and teen suicides, often related to bullying and depression, has tripled in the last 60 years.  In the U.S. we are now averaging 28 such deaths a week, 4 a day!  Today we’ll talk with a high school student, we’ll call Cara.  And then we talk with an expert in the field of relational aggression, Dr. Cheryl Dellasega, Professor of Humanities in the College of Medicine and Professor of Women’s Studies at Penn State University     

 

 

BULLYING: K thru LIFE    part 2     Today 43% of all teens have experienced online harassment and 1 in 7 high school students have reported considering suicide.  Dr. Dellasega notes that Relational Aggression (RA) is often dismissed by school personnel as teasing or they may feel anything short of physical violence is non-threatening.  But all forms of Relational Aggression is bullying, a form of violence with both short and long-term consequences.  We return to our discussion with Dr. Cheryl Dellasega.

StoryCorps: Rob Littlefield

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 02:03

Rob Littlefield remembers being bullied in junior high school for being gay.

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Rob Littlefield, now 55, was in high school when his classmates began bullying him for being gay.

Here, Rob tells how this abuse affected him and his family.

This I Believe - Kamaal Majeed

From This I Believe | Part of the This I Believe series | 03:19

Student Kamaal Majeed believes in being content with himself and not seeking the approval of others.

Tiblogosmall_small HOST: This I Believe has received thousands of essays from young people. Today we hear from one of them. Kamaal Majeed (kah-MAHL mah-JSHEED) is a junior at Waltham High School in Massachusetts and wrote his essay in his English Class last year. He loves studying language, and intends to use his knowledge to help people understand one another better. And -- as with most of his personal decisions -- Majeed is not likely to knocked off course by the judgments or expectations of others, as you'll hear in his essay for This I Believe. MAJEED: "Why don?t you 'act black'?" Since my middle school years, I've been asked this question more than any other. It seems to me that too many people have let society program into their brains what should be expected of me, a black person, before ever interacting with me. But I believe in being who I am, not who others want me to be. On my first day of high school, going into math class, two of my classmates pointed and laughed at me. I initially thought my fly was open, or that something was stuck in my teeth. But as I took my seat, I heard one of the students whisper, "Why is a black person taking honors?" So my fly wasn't open. An honors level class had simply been joined by a student whose skin was an unsettling shade of brown. Many people think my clothes should be big enough for me to live in, or expect me to listen exclusively to "black music." In seventh grade, a group of my peers fixed their cold stares on my outfit: cargo shorts and a plain, fitting t-shirt. They called out to me, "Go get some 'gangsta' clothes, white boy." In one of my Spanish classes, as part of a review exercise, the teacher asked me, "Te gusta mas, la musica de rap o rock?" "Do you like rap music or rock music more?" I replied, "La musica de rock." The look of shock on my classmates' faces made me feel profoundly alienated I am now in my junior year of high school. I still take all honors courses. My wardrobe still consists solely of clothes that are appropriate to my proportions. My music library spans from rock to pop to techno, and almost everything in between. When it comes to choosing my friends, I am still colorblind. I continue to do my best work in school in order to reach my goals; and yet, when I look in the mirror, I still see skin of that same shade of brown. My skin color has done nothing to change my personality, and my personality has done nothing to change my skin color. I believe in being myself. I believe that I -- not any stereotype -- should define who I am and what actions I take in life. In high school, popularity often depends on your willingness to follow trends. And I've been told that it doesn't get much easier going into adulthood. But the only other option is to sacrifice my individuality for the satisfaction and approval of others. Sure, this can be appealing, since choosing to keep my self-respect intact has made me unpopular and disliked at times, with no end to that in sight. But others' being content with me is not nearly as important as my being content with myself.

SUPA BAD (ANTI-BULLYING DEDICATION)

From BRICK CASEY | 03:30

"SUPA BAD"

This song and release is dedicated to the efforts of all who oppose Bullying and is standing in the movement to help prevent the issue of Bullying from growing into a national epidemic.

Bully_cd_cover_small SUPA BAD (Anti-Bullying Dedication)

Brick Casey says: "BULLYING IS NOT COOL"

Bullying is one of the most silent, (yet most public), issue in our world today. Most people assume that bullying is an issue amongst teens and young adults....NOT TRUE.

In fact, there's many different types of bullying that takes place in our lives everyday.

Here's just a few examples of the various types:

Workplace Bullying
Size Discrimination
Gender Bullying
Domestic Bullying
Sibling Bullying
Cyber Bullying
Drivers Bullying
Political Bullying

...and many many more.

My, (Brick Casey), hopes in producing this song SUPA BAD, is to create greater awareness with respects to bullying so that in the end...our schools, workplaces, communities and the world will be a healthier, (and happier one).

We can only do this together however...so do your part to end bullying TODAY!

Sincerely,
Brick Casey

For More Info: WWW.SUPABAD.WEBS.COM

MORE:

(YOUTUBE:)   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KESRu3DI_lk

(SOUNDCLOUD): http://soundcloud.com/brick-casey/supa-bad-radio

SUPA BAD (VIMEO):
http://vimeo.com/29162735

(MYSPACE): http://www.myspace.com/video/rid/110569387

(REVERBNATION): http://www.reverbnation.com/artist/control_room/1329093#!/artist/artist_videos/1329093?sel_video_id=8703947&autoplay=1

CRUELTY KILLS

From Voices of Our World | 28:00

Our guest today, Adam Mitchell, has a lot to offer on the subject of kid on kid cruelty

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Part One     CRUELTY KILLS    47 U.S. States have now enacted anti-bullying laws.     Whether these laws will be enforceable remains to be seen.   There are also many private initiatives, such as the "It Gets Better" ad campaign, intended to empower teens struggling with sexual identity issues, as they are so frequently targeted by bullies.  14-year-old Jamie Rodemeyer of Buffalo, N.Y. commended the "It Gets Better" ads, but just couldn't follow the advice to wait it out.  He read an anonymous post on his Formspring page, "Jamie is stupid, gay, fat and ugly. He must die."  Tragically, that was the direction he chose to take.   Our guest today has a lot to offer on the subject of kid on kid cruelty.  He is a Martial Arts Instructor and a school lecturer on his counter-cruelty movement, www.TheKidsAreUnited.com.   Adam Mitchell is next on Voices.

 

Part Two:    CRUELTY KILLS        It's a safe bet that not one person listening to this show today can say they were never teased, hurt, never feigned illness to stay home, never closed the bedroom door to cry it out.  Joel Burns, an openly gay city councilman in Fort Worth, Texas, in an impromptu and very emotional address, which went viral immediately, began by saying, "I've never told this before tonight."  He proceeded to relive the names he'd been called and the moment the incessant harassment had driven him to the edge of suicide.  He urged kids going through what he had, to endure and outgrow their tormentors.  "You'll get out of that high school and never deal with those jerks again!"   We now have a new verb, bullycide. But parents, teachers and as Adam Mitchell encourages, student leaders in particular can be the 1st line of defense.  We return to our conversation with Adam Mitchell.

Bullying in schools through the eyes of teens

From MPR News Stations | Part of the MPR News' Youth Series series | 05:30

Grace Pastoor, a high school junior in St. Louis Park, Minnesota, interviewed students about how they see bullying and whether they think adults can do anything about it.

20110506_1bullying050511_39_small Grace Pastoor, a high school junior in St. Louis Park, Minnesota, interviewed students about how they see bullying and whether they think adults can do anything about it.

Soundtrack to School Violence

From Philly Youth Radio | Part of the Students of Violence series | 05:02

Cristel Martinez came to America from the Dominican Republic with a dream to become a music producer. But the only music she hears in school, says the eighteen-year-old senior, is the sound of violence.

Cristelprx_small Cristel Martinez came to America from the Dominican Republic with a dream to become a music producer. But the only music she hears in school, says the eighteen-year-old senior, is the sound of violence.

Peer Mediation with a Pencil

From Philly Youth Radio | Part of the Students of Violence series | 02:51

Shayla Torres dealt with a lot of violence in her last school, where she was a peer mediator. Here, the 17-year-old junior recalls one especially contentious situation.

Shaylaprx_small Shayla Torres dealt with a lot of violence in her last school, where she was a peer mediator. Here, the 17-year-old junior recalls one especially contentious situation.

Portrait of the Bully as a Young Man

From Blunt Youth Radio Project | 09:34

Jeff's reputation as a bully was something of a legend in the coastal town where he grew up. Eight years later, and with a chance to start over again, Jeff knows why he bullied...and why he might not stop.

Img_9595_small Jeff's reputation as a bully was something of a legend in the coastal town where he grew up.  Eight years later, and with a chance to start over again, Jeff knows why he bullied...and why it might still work for him.  Can you grow out of bullying?  And what would it take for bullying to seem less useful in the first place?

This piece was produced by Jones Franzel with funding from a Transom Donor Grant.  It is presented by Blunt Youth Radio's Incarcerated Youth Speak Out Project.