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Playlist: Slice of Life

Compiled By: Leigh Cooper

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Radio Curious (Series)

Produced by Barry Vogel

Most recent piece in this series:

Reading Dogs

From Barry Vogel | Part of the Radio Curious series | 29:02

Playing
Reading Dogs
From
Barry Vogel

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This radio program is about reading. Learning to read is often confusing and frustrating. Parents and teachers sometimes create stress that flows from their personal angst to the frustration of the child trying to read. Reading to a nonjudgemental creature, who never comments and always appears to pay attention, often helps to create reading fluency.

In this edition of Radio Curious we visit with Becky Bishop, founder of Reading With Rover, a program to help children learn to read. Becky Bishop also operates Puppy Manners, a dog training school located in Woodenville, Washington, about thirty miles from Seattle. Becky Bishop relies on the close bond between children and dogs that creates calm moments and encourages a learning environment. Her organization, “Reading With Rover” couples children who have difficulty reading with a dog who has no trouble listening.

When Becky Bishop and I visited by phone from her home in Washington on February 22, 2010, we discussed why dogs are better listeners than teachers or parents, and we began with Becky explaining how dogs help children to read.

The books Becky Bishop recommends are “Living Life As A Thank You: The Transformative Power Of Daily Gratitude,” by Nina Lesowitz and Mary Beth Sammon, and “Walter the Farting Dog,” by William Kotzwinkle, Glenn Murray, Elizabeth Gundy, and Audrey Coleman.

The website to Reading With Rover is www.readingwithrover.org.  The website to Puppy Manners is www.puppymanners.com

WBEZ's Clever Apes (Series)

Produced by WBEZ

Most recent piece in this series:

Clever Apes: Nature and human nature

From WBEZ | Part of the WBEZ's Clever Apes series | 08:16

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First off, this episode is sort of a goodbye. I will be departing my beloved WBEZ shortly to strike out for new adventures. I’ll include my weepy valedictory at the bottom of this post. But the story this week is important, so before your attention wanders …

As kids, we usually learn about nature from a decidedly human point of view. The world exists in relation to us. People are the stars in this scenario: We are Hamlet, while nature is like Denmark – the place where we happen to be. The conventional wisdom has been that this is a universal way the mind develops its awareness of the natural world.

But an eclectic group of researchers are challenging that. The team is made up of psychologists from Northwestern University, and researchers from the Menominee Reservation and the American Indian Center of Chicago. They started looking carefully at the way Native and non-Native children come to learn about nature. They found some distinctive differences.

Namely, Native kids tend not to have that anthropocentric view in the early years. They come to see the biological world in terms of relationships and connections – what psychologists call “systems-level thinking.” Non-Native kids, on the other hand, generally think more in hierarchical categories like taxonomy – kingdom, phylum, species, etc. So the human-centered learning may not be universal after all, but instead flavored by the culture we grow up in. 

This goes deeper than just having different beliefs. The scientists say those distinctive worldviews actually change the way we think, learn and reason. Over the last decade or so, the team has been designing experiments to tease out the ramifications of that change. It has major consequences for education, 
and might (this is my speculation!) influence our attitudes about the environment.


So, this will be my final episode of Clever Apes. We are hopeful that it will continue in some form, so you may not have heard the last of WBEZ’s science experiment. Creating this series has been a rare privilege – I have had one of the greatest gigs in media. My deepest gratitude goes to my editor Cate Cahan, whose gusto and keen mind have long inspired me. Michael De Bonis has been a fantastic collaborator, friend and co-conspirator, without whom the Apes would be far less clever. And Sally Eisele has shown great vision (or folly) in supporting this weird project from the get-go. 

Encounters (Series)

Produced by Encounters: Radio Experiences in the North

Most recent piece in this series:

Encounters Mountain Sheep

From Encounters: Radio Experiences in the North | Part of the Encounters series | 29:00

Richard_and_thumper_small On this blustery day, head up the steepest mountains above the Alaska Highway near the Canadian border to get a super close up view of a group of Rams.

Snap Judgment hosted by Glynn Washington - Specials (Series)

Produced by Snap Judgment

Most recent piece in this series:

Snap Judgment #503: Joy And Pain

From Snap Judgment | Part of the Snap Judgment hosted by Glynn Washington - Specials series | 53:57

Joyandpain-square_small Unwedding

Valentine's day is about love, about girlfriends, boyfriends, partners, wives. But what about our lovers passed? Those that we still hold in our hearts, those that we still sometimes sort of love? Those we can’t let go of? This couple tells the story.

This story was produced by the dynamic duo Sharon Mashihi and Rachel James. For more of what they do check this out.

Producer: Sharon Mashihi and Rachel James

Henry and Jane

A husband and wife think they are doing the best they can to keep their marriage in tact, then they enter the storm. Find an extended version of this story on Lea Thau’s Strangers, from KCRW’s Independent Producer Project.

Producer: Lea Thau


The Refresh Button

We all sometimes ask ourselves, if we had a day, a week, a year left to live, what would we do with that time. Hear what one couple did when they faced that dark fantasy in real life.

Producer: Julia Dewitt


Just Us

One woman’s experience leaves her unable to trust, until she finds just the right partner. Find out about Sunny Jacobs and Peter Pringle at www.sunnyandpeter.com

Producer: Anna Sussman

State of the Re:Union Fall 2010 Season (Series)

Produced by Al Letson

Most recent piece in this series:

Veterans Day Special

From Al Letson | Part of the State of the Re:Union Fall 2010 Season series | 53:53

Sotru_vets_square_240_small STATE OF THE RE:UNION
Veterans Day Special
SOTRU explores the challenges veterans face as they return home from war

HOST: Al Letson

DESCRIPTION: The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are sending our veterans home with wounds and obstacles not always clearly visible to the rest of the country. These two current wars also illuminate how veterans of previous eras are still trying to come home years after returning from war. In this episode, State of the Re:Union explores how veterans are serving each other after they come back home from serving the country.

BILLBOARD (:59)
Incue: From PRX and NPR...
Outcue: But first, this news.
 
NEWS HOLE: 1:00- 6:00
 
Segment A (12:29)
Incue: From PRX and NPR...
Outcue: ahead on State of the Re:Union

A. VETERAN'S BOOK PROJECT: Riley Sharbonno returned from a year in Iraq with thousands of digital images that he took, but with no memory of the events the photographs captured. So when artist Monica Haller approached him, the two embarked on a project that ended up as a book of Riley's photographs and writing. This book sparked the Veteran's Book Project, a bookmaking workshop for people who have experienced the wars through many different perspectives. While each book tells a different story, together the books are creating a library of honest conversations about what happens during war.

BREAK: 19:00- 20:00

SEGMENT B (18:59)
Incue: You're listening to State of the Re:Union
Outcue: P-R-X.O-R-G

A. O's GUITAR: Richard O'Connor left for Vietnam with his father's old Montgomery Ward guitar. In between fighting and attacks, he played songs for his fellow marines in order to keep a sense of sanity and calm amidst chaos and devastation. Now, 42 years after returning home, Richard is using his music to welcome back recently returning veterans. But he's also finding his own way home.

BREAK: 39:00- 40:00

SEGMENT C (18:59)
Incue: You're listening to State of the Re:Union
Outcue: This is N-P-R

A. TEAM SEMPER FI: On a foggy Sunday morning in Santa Cruz, California, a team of injured marines take the same camaraderie and strength from the battlefield, and bring it to the competitive sports track.

B. FARMER VETERANS: The country is having a hard enough time dealing with the unemployment rate, so imagine returning home from war, and then having to find a job. But a growing movement of veterans are finding their stride by creating a new mission once they return home: Feeding the country. SOTRU visits two farms that are on this mission.

C. REFLECTION: Al reflects on a country dividing its attention between two wars and their own lives.

D. VOX: A montage of voices of those who have experienced the challenges of coming home, from veterans to family members, of all services, of all eras.

PROGRAM OUT @ 59:00

The fall season of The State of the Re:Union is available now on PRX and the ContentDepot without charge to all public radio stations, and may be aired an unlimited number of times prior to May 31, 2012. The program may be streamed live on station websites but not archived. Excerpting is permitted for promotional purposes only.

The State of the Re:Union is produced by Al Letson, and presented by PRX. Major funding for the State of the Re:Union comes from CPB, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

Thanks for your consideration of this season of SOTRU.  Please contact Israel Smith at ismarketing@yahoo.com or 612-377-3256 with questions or to confirm carriage.

99% Invisible (Standard Length) (Series)

Produced by Roman Mars

Most recent piece in this series:

visible #122- Good Egress (Standard 4:30 version)

From Roman Mars | Part of the 99% Invisible (Standard Length) series | 04:30

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When designing a commercial structure, there is one safety component that must be designed right into the building from the start: egress.

 

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[Credit: MySafetySign.com]

“Egress” refers to an entire exit system from a building: stairs, corridors, and evacuation routes outside the building. Each state’s building code specifies a certain number of means of egress, depending on the size and purpose of the structure.

Simply put, there have to be enough doors, corridors, and stairs for every occupant to exit in an orderly manner in the event of an emergency.

Historically, the biggest threat to architecture has been fire, and architecture has evolved to resist it. In the 1700s, the best that building occupants could do in the event of a fire was to shout for firemen, who would bring the  “fire escape”—essentially a cart with a ladder on it.

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[The earliest fire escapes were mobile. Credit:  Reliance Fire Company]

Fire escape methods became incorporated into architecture with the invention of the scuttle. The scuttle looked like a modern skylight with an attached ladder, allowing one to access the roof, at which point that person could walk onto a neighbor’s roof and climb down through their scuttle.

Many cities required that scuttles be incorporated in new construction, and it was the first time that architecture was regulated for the sake of fire safety.

2014-07-07 05.38.54 pm[Credit: Bilco.com]

By about 1860, New York began to require means of egress in tenement buildings. Landlords, of course, often went with the least expensive egress option: rope

Houghton's_Fire_Escape_1877[Courtesy of  Scientific American]

There were ropes and ropes with baskets, with which people were supposed to lower themselves to the ground. There were even advertisements for fake cabinets, hollow refrigerators, and empty washing machines in which to stow away a rope baskets.

rope escape[Image courtesy of Sara Wermiel]

One engineer actually thought that, instead of dispatching the ropes from indoors, archers could shoot the ropes up to the higher floors.

Another patent proposed individual parachute hats, with accompanying rubber shoes to break the fall.

parachute hat

[Image courtesy of Sara Wermiel]

There were also fire escape slides, which were marketed to schools as both emergency devices and playground equipment.

fireescapeslide[Credit: Rootsweb]

By the 1870s, fire escapes had become permanent iron structures. Some were just straight ladders clamped to walls, others were the angled ladders more resembling stairs. But in true disasters, fire escapes didn’t suffice.

New York’s Asch Building was required to have three means of egress. The developer insisted the property would be just be used as warehousing, so rather than installing three stairs, he was allowed to put in two stairs and a thin fire escape.

The owner rented the top three floors of the Asch Building to the Triangle Shirtwaist Company.

9thfloor2014-07-07 05.52.16 pm[Floorplan of the Asch Building. Credit: Cornell University]

On March 25, 1911, a fire broke out in the Asch Building and spread quickly.

Workers on the tenth floor were able to survive by taking the stairs up through a fire exit to the roof. Workers on the eighth floor were by and large able to get out by taking the stairs down.

But workers on the ninth floor were trapped. Only a few people on the ninth floor knew about the tenth floor exit, and most didn’t know to go upstairs. Allegedly, one of the doors out of the building was locked—though even if it wasn’t, the staircases that would have provided egress were too narrow and winding to hold the number of people who needed to escape.

2014-07-07 06.03.04 pm[The Asch Building fire escape. Courtesy of the The California State University of Northridge]

A number of workers tried to use the outside fire escape, but it collapsed under their weight. It was from the windows of the ninth floor that many workers, desperate to escape the flames and smoke, fell or jumped to their deaths.

146 people died, most of them women, right in the middle of Greenwich Village.

asch building2[Courtesy of New York Public Library]

2014-07-07 06.41.28 pm[Aftermath of the Triangle fire. Courtesy of Cornell University]

The building, however, was fine. It was a fireproof structure, which is why, at the time, no one really thought it needed egress. The Asch building, now called the Brown Building, is part of New York University.

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[The Brown Building of Science. Credit: Wally Gobetz.]

Exits and egress were a problem, people thought, for the tenements and poor quality buildings. Popular logic was that if a building was first class and non-combustable, the occupants could be safely locked inside.

The Triangle fire proved that architecture couldn’t protect people. People had to protect themselves from architecture. After the Triangle Fire, the National Fire Protection Association started collecting data and studying  effective egress.

Fire escapes, it turns out, just didn’t work.

ornamental fire escape

[Courtesy of Sarah Wermiel]

Because they weren’t commonly used, fire escapes were often in states of disrepair or eroded by the elements. Even if they were maintained, fire escapes were not accessible to people with disabilities, the young, the elderly, and women, who were hamstrung by their long skirts.

Most importantly, since people were not accustomed to using fire escapes, they often didn’t know where they were located.

Generally speaking, people try to leave a building the same way they entered it, and the modern fire escape is designed for this logic.  They are the first place you would think to go in an emergency. They are the stairs. Or rather, they look like normal staircases, but they are truly  pieces of emergency equipment: enclosed in fire proof walls, sealed with a self-closing door, and covered in sprinklers and alarms.

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[The fire stairs in Oakland's Tribune Tower. Credit: Alex Kelley.]

2014-07-07[Fire Stairs in San Francisco. Credit: Malik Adan]

Because the fire stairs work perfectly well as stairways, they’re often the stairway in a building. Rather than spending the money and space on an opulent lobby with a grand, sweeping stairway, new construction tends to just have elevators and fire stairs.

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[These stairs in Rome are a rarity. Credit: Duluoz Cats]

Today, fire stairways need to be “rated,” meaning they need to be enclosed in a construction that won’t melt or allow the fire to penetrate as quickly as a non-rated wall. This is why the stairs are always shoved off into a cold, industrial-looking tower, no matter what the building looks like from the outside.

The rated towers and other emergency structures are now modeled with egress software such as Exodus, which allows architects and consultants to plug in the measurements of the building, its emergency equipment, the maximum number of occupants,  click “play,” and watch digital people escape the pixel flames.

 

This software works because humans generally behave predictably in emergencies. In a state of panic, people don’t want to go places they haven’t gone before, or use devices they’ve never seen, or suddenly see if they can catch a rope shot with a bow and arrow. The way egress works now is in keeping with the way we use buildings normally.

Rated towers might be ugly, expensive, and space-consuming, but they help save lives.  In 2012, there were 65 deaths in non-residential structures, which  are the buildings with the heavy regulations and rated stairways. This number is already down from 2003, where there were 220 deaths in non-residential structures.

Advances in egress make external fire escapes look primordial, but there’s still something beautiful about them, even the ones no longer in use.  Fire escapes are a physical reminder of how we evolved past being a culture that says, “Here’s a rope. Good luck, buddy!”

Tall escape[Fire escape on a fourteen-story, 1907 San Francisco office building. Courtesy of Sara Wermiel]

99% Invisible producer Avery Trufelman spoke with professors Sara Wermiel and Elijah Huge, and Arcsine principal architects Daniel Scovill and Adam Winig

Music: “Begleitung für Tuba”- Ursula Bogner; “Waver”- Ok Ikumi; “Lorencio”-Vistas; “Ijiraq”- Dawn of Midi; “Golden Hours”- Brian Eno; “Untitled III”- Calexico; “Recording 100!”- Rhae Dawn Royal; “Helicopter”- M.Ward; “Sifting in Sans”- Set in Sand

Title photo by Beau Dacious

This is the accordion fire escape outside our window. Eek!

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“Journalism is a translation of madness, and poetry is a transcription of madness.” – Sean Cole, journalist, poet, and 99pi regular. Listen past the credits to hear Sean reading from Frank O’Hara’s “Meditations in an Emergency.”

BUT WAIT! THERE’S MORE: we want to see your “Good Egress” inspired images for ourNow You See It project. Submit to our Flickr group, email them to nowyouseeit@99percentinvisible.org or put them on Instagram with the hashtag #99PI. We’ll be curating and presenting our favorites on our Instagram and Tumblr.

Need inspiration? Check out Kate Joyce’s latest Image Correspondence posts.

Too Much Information (Series)

Produced by WFMU

Most recent piece in this series:

It's All Over

From WFMU | Part of the Too Much Information series | 54:02

Playing
It's All Over
From
WFMU

Tminub_small G.S. recalls how bad karma took him from Devon, England to the C.U.T. bomb shelters in Montana. Author Robert Brockway explains how everything is going to kill everybody, and Matt Jarvis explains what it means to be a prepper. Pamela Walt has bad vibes in general, and our DC correspondent "Chris" has a bad feeling about the Tea Party. Also, astronomer Chris Impey explains how dark energy is the ending of all endings.

Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow (Series)

Produced by Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow- Phil Mariage

Most recent piece in this series:

Amputees

From Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow- Phil Mariage | Part of the Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow series | 29:00

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ABLE - is the support group Amputees Beyond Life's Expectations   This is a generational discussion featuring Malinda Spivey who lost her leg at age 14 from cancer. Her amputation was extremely high to the hip area. Her experience was frighteningly alone. Scott Burton is the founder of ABLE and is helping other groups get started. Danny Smith lost his leg in a construction accident and is heading up the Hot Springs, AR group.

 

 

The Stream (Series)

Produced by Wendy Levy

Most recent piece in this series:

Episode #11: 5 Minutes with Peter Broderick

From Wendy Levy | Part of the The Stream series | 05:00

Screen_shot_stream_small 5 Minute Mix