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Comment on piece: Remorse: The 14 Stories of Eric Morse

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Review of Remorse: The 14 Stories of Eric Morse

I would very much appreciate to hear this story on the radio. It provides an insight into an area and a story that I would not have access to under normal circumstances.

LeAlan and Lloyd guide listeners through the story in a way that keeps the very heavy topic from crushing them.

Comment on piece: Jefferson & Science

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Review of Jefferson & Science

As a student of science (physics) I believed this piece would appeal to me from the beginning. The tone and content of the recording only affirmed this.

I found it short, but telling. It echos an opinion that many in the science professions must have. I found that it left me wanting more, wanting to hear the speaker go further into the opinions of Jefferson as well as the other founders. In that sense it was a little questionable.

At the same time, though, it seemed to have a very good amount of content for such a short time; there was neither too little nor too much information in the essay.

On the whole an enjoyable piece.

Comment on piece: Luke Hurley

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Review of Luke Hurley

This piece deals with Hurley's early career, a turning point through which he abandoned commercial music and its processs, and returned to his craft on his terms. It is well produced, weaving samples of his music into the interview. I would recommend it.

Comment on piece: Mark Twain's The War Prayer

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Review of Mark Twain's The War Prayer

Voice acting was good.

Comment on piece: Taming the Snake

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Review of Taming the Snake

I found it very informative, a bit too one-sided however. I think it would be a good piece to run on a national level, however it would probably need to be edited down a bit.

Comment on piece: No Email from Oaxaca

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Review of No Email from Oaxaca

I very much like quiet personal pieces describing everyday events, particularly when they reflect thoughts similar to those I have had and forgotten about in the past. This piece evokes those with its easy pace and honest, sincere tone. The author does not really try to make a political statement but instead gives a personal angle on how he would like to see the technology gap bridged in the place where he lives.

Comment on piece: Sweet Phil from Sugar Hill

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Review of Sweet Phil from Sugar Hill

This was a very well-produced segment. The pacing and length was about right, and some of the interview segments were particularly charming.

Comment on piece: The Book

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Review of The Book

The Book maintains a good, weird tone throughout, building off of the curious, genial foibles that all homeowners discover in their homes, then progressing toward a solid ending in the method of Poe or Lovecraft. This story fits well in the Urban Legend category!

Imagination is played to strongly in the piece. Mystery is maintained, and the descriptions are suitable. The end of The Book is refreshingly uncluttered -- the darkness of the peice is not handed over on a silver platter, which allowed my own shadowy side to fill in the blanks in a satisfying way.

The reader's quick, narrative-style pace of reading sabotages the work, but if the alternative is overcooked melodrama, then I prefer this. This was a very good story, and with a little touch-up in the read I would be happy to hear it broadcast.

Comment on piece: The Ice hotel

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Review of The Ice hotel

Definitive account of an American's visit to the Swedish ice hotel. I've been intrigued for years by the Ice Hotel idea, and with the hotels appearing in Bond films and North America (Canada), I was afraid they were becoming a bit of a cliche. The presenter offers not only a quirky personal journey, but also addresses just about everything you'd want to know without actually freezing yourself. Great radio, and very enjoyable.

Comment on piece: 1000 Postcards

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A High Quality Piece

The piece remains interesting throughout, and the variety of narration keeps the listener's attention. The story is compelling, and contains many different aspects: The Working-Class-Dad, the Hope-For-The-Next-Generation, and a bit of humor.

Comment on piece: The Book

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Review of The Book

The story itself was good. I liked the voice of the person also. It made me want to listen to more by Hans.

Comment on piece: 1000 Postcards

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Review of 1000 Postcards

A very sweet and personal story told by a daughter about her father sending her postcards everyday she was away at college. It became something more than what was intend and touched lives of many of the studets at the school the daughter attended.

Very good.

Comment on piece: Of A Piece

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Review of Of A Piece

I like to hear people talking so effortlessly about "my Dad." So much of what I hear about Dad's is that they are deadbeats, aren't pulling their weight, or are in some way responsible for the demise of the family. Well, a lot of times they (we?) are. But, it's good to hear these stories about Dads where he's a loved man, a good guy.

I heard this piece originally on Transom, and it's a good one, worthy of any time slot it can be given. Michelle covers a lot of how the story came about on Transom.org (http://www.transom.org/shows/2004/200401_ofapiece.html). I like the fact that her narration is unscripted. I'm not sure I can easily identify what it does exactly, maybe it gives it a continuous spontaneity, instead of only being spontaneous during the interview points. Some of the tape is noisy, but it's put together well and gives a different perspective on Father's Day.

There are some honest moments in this piece. This isn't about puzzles, really, it's about a relationship that uses puzzles as the MacGuffin.

Comment on piece: God is Talking to Me

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Review of God is Talking to Me

A Father's Day story with a twist that still ends up being a Father's Day story. Hans Anderson is the knuckle-baller in PRX: He amuses, he challenges, he fools, he cajoles from one story to the next. Here he captures one curiously common feature of Father's Day narratives -- the absent father -- and creates something immense, even while endorsing the happy-finding-of-Dad motif.

In this story particularly, Anderson reminds us that when we tell stories, we are all too often at sleep behind the wheel. Some will argue that this is fiction: Well, that never stopped you from presenting White House coverage.

PDs: You've got a week here: Drop Don Gonyea and 9 mins. plus at the White House for this. Your listeners will love you.

Comment on piece: The Imaginary Village

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Review of The Imaginary Village

This is a lovely impressionistic piece rich with imagery and feeling. More than a story or narrative, it's a record of loss and it succeeds by working almost entirely on an emotional level. It's stirring and stays with you; it's maddening and confounding. Seen from here, the Middle East conflict looks impenetrable and the headlines simply repetitive and tiresome. Seen from the Imaginary Village, it seems much closer to home.

Comment on piece: 1000 Postcards

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Review of 1000 Postcards

A wonderful piece when I first heard it on Transom, a delight to hear again. Everything is so absolutely natural in the layout and design of the piece. Here's a father everyone can love and a daughter not ashamed to admit it.

A real treat for an otherwise fabricated holiday.

Comment on piece: Dads

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Review of Dads

There are unexpectedly poignant moments in these brief interviews which are somehow simultaneously casual and intimate. Because of the collage treatment, you don't really get to know any individual characters--either the speakers or their fathers--in a coherent way, but instead, you receive an oddly affecting composite portrait of fathers, or, more precisely, the EFFECT of fathers. The ending is a bit truncated, leaving you with a mid-stream feeling. For that reason, I'd recommend using this in a larger context, as an element in a larger consideration of fathers. If anything, this piece should be longer, more developed, which might give it more cumulative impact

Comment on piece: God is Talking to Me

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Review of God is Talking to Me

Edgy and artful and funny and provocative and compelling. Sean Cole's review is dead on. But where can it air? This is not your father's Father's Day special -- and I hope its fate will be something more than being just an underground hit for audioheads. It would make a great pick for any station that does an audio showcase. And the first AAA station that dares to broadcast this piece during music programming, even if late at night, should get the PRX medal of valor.

Comment on piece: Think About Your Movies

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Review of Think About Your Movies

In this commentary/essay against bad movies, the essayist expands his thoughts to culture in general and television in particular, why art doesn't satisfy most people, and why South Park is more artsy than just about any other television show. The narrator makes the point that if you don't have to think about it at all, it's not art. And, he says, the worst films and television shows are biggest hits.

This goes back to what my R/TV professor told me in one mass media class: popular movies and shows are popular because they appeal to the most people. This is obvious. But the reason they appeal to the most people is that they are middle-of-the-road. It is just like that vanilla party guest who won't be trapped in a stand, neither pro or anti, nor, as it turns out, is he interesting. To be interesting, you need to actually say something, not just exist for a laugh track or to be the show most people watch.

The personal perspective is from a video store clerk, those that I imagine have seen so many movies -- it's almost a job requirement after all -- that they are sick of vanilla and probably pity the rest of us that aren't yet.

This piece is well-thought-out and makes good points without being too stuck up about art. I think most PR listeners can identify and will agree with this essay.

Comment on piece: God is Talking to Me

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Review of God is Talking to Me

This piece is exhausting to listen to, but in a good way. I didn't catch every word, but that is part of the point, and the important (and very funny) parts were clear and made for a very amusing, well-written and well-presented piece of storytelling. If I had to describe what this is 'about', I am not sure I would be able to do so. I'd just say, listen to it and find out yourself. I would love to hear this on the radio, anytime.