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Playlist: Julia Scott's Portfolio

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Bon Voyage

From Julia Scott | 23:00

A dying man and his husband try to meet death in style.

Playing
Bon Voyage
From
Julia Scott

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RAVE REVIEW: The Guardian calls BON VOYAGE "Vivid and beautifully told
... A tremendous listen: you felt as if you knew both subjects within moments, and got an insight into the hardest moments a relationship will face."


Paul Perkovic and his husband, Eric Trefelner, have lived in style for 36 years. When they find out that Paul has inoperable pancreatic cancer, they decide he should go out in style, too. Eric plans a lavish, quarter million-dollar "Bon Voyage" party at a fine arts museum in San Francisco. Paul and Eric aren't just planning a party; they're trying to choreograph a death. But when relationship breakdowns developm that neither man expects, the couple discovers that death has its own agenda. BON VOYAGE brings the listener along on the intimate, emotional journey of a same-sex couple coping with mortality.

STORY UPDATE : Paul Perkovic died November 26, 2012, in Eric Trefelner's arms at their home in Montara, Calif.

PRODUCER Julia Scott is an award-winning radio producer, journalist and essayist based in San Francisco. She produces documentaries and news features for several nationally syndicated programs. Her previous work is archived at www.juliascott.net .

EXECUTIVE PRODUCER Anne Donohue is Associate Professor of Journalism at Boston University. She was the special projects editor at Monitor Radio for five years, and has also been a contributor to NPR, the BBC, WGBH, WBUR and other public radio programs.

BON VOYAGE is part of Real America, a series from the BBC World Service that enlisted four American producers to tell stories found only in America.

Growing Pains: new farmers break the mold

From KALW | 09:33

Thousands of acres of farmland disappear each year in California -- to make way for suburbs and office parks – when that land is developed, the dreams of a new generation of farmers can disappear. Although the average farmer today is over 55, the high demand for organic produce has inspired a younger group of farmers to start tilling the earth. But these new farmers are struggling to find land they can afford and a business model that works. Reporter Julia Scott has the story.

Seg_a_small Thousands of acres of farmland disappear each year in California -- to make way for suburbs and office parks – when that land is developed, the dreams of a new generation of farmers can disappear. Although the average farmer today is over 55, the high demand for organic produce has inspired a younger group of farmers to start tilling the earth. But these new farmers are struggling to find land they can afford and a business model that works. Reporter Julia Scott has the story.

California salmon are back, but for how long?

From KALW | 07:13

This spring marks the first time in three years that fishermen have been able to land Sacramento River Chinook since salmon populations crashed in 2008. Now managers are predicting the biggest salmon season in years. But how long will the boom times last before another salmon bust? Reporter Julia Scott discovers that the hatcheries California built to sustain its king salmon may have created a species more vulnerable to natural disasters.

Picture_1_small This spring marks the first time in three years that fishermen have been able to land Sacramento River Chinook since salmon populations crashed in 2008. Now managers are predicting the biggest salmon season in years. But how long will the boom times last before another salmon bust? Reporter Julia Scott discovers that the hatcheries California built to sustain its king salmon may have created a species more vulnerable to natural disasters.