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Playlist: O'Dark 30 episode 17

Compiled By: KUT

Caption: PRX default Playlist image

Back for a 17th consecutive week it's O’Dark 30, KUT's exploration of the world of independent radio production. Every Sundays at midnight on KUT 90.5 Austin we present 3 hours of a little bit of everything from the world of independent radio production.

Episode 17 includes God is Talking to Me...horrible deaths...Valley of Neptune Tribute to Jimi Hendrix...Tupperware...The Mikie Show #2...Madoff Whistle Blower: "No One Would Listen"...Bioneers: They Don't Call Her Mother Earth for Nothing

God is Talking to Me

From Hans Anderson | 09:24

When God talks to me, sometimes it means I have to do things I don't want to do

Default-piece-image-2 This piece was produced in response to a call for fiction for B-side Radio in Berkeley.  Learn more about B-side at http://www.bside-radio.org. For more information and conversation, visit this feature on Transom.org.

horrible deaths

From Nate DiMeo | Part of the the memory palace series | 04:41

in which we learn about the New York Times' faded inclination to write stories that highlight "horrible deaths"--news of industrial accidents and other tragic mishaps around the country. Here, we listen to five stories pulled from the Times' archives. Each tragic tale telling the story of how someone lost their life and, in doing so, telling the listener about lost ways of living and working in America.

Horrible_for_prx_small

This is an episode of the memory palace podcast.  Listen to the whole series at www.thememorypalace.us
Each episode is a short (between 1:30 and 5:30) water-coolery story of the past, with an emphasis on American History.   

Valleys of Neptune Tribute to Jimi Hendrix

From Media Mechanics | 58:59

A new CD helps answer the question: where was Jimi Hendrix headed next?

Jimi-hendrix-von_small Jimi Hendrix was very busy in 1969.  Coming off the success of the number 1 album, Electric Ladyland, Hendrix had developed a reputation as both a masterful showman and a brilliant experimentalist.

That year, Jimi built his own recording studio, closed the show at Woodstock, and recorded with a new group, The Band of Gypsys.  All the while, he kept up a busy touring schedule and recorded constantly. 


Unlike contemporary artists like The Beatles and Bob Dylan, Hendrix was not contractually obligated to record at a specific studio.  Consequently, he could record wherever he pleased and would grab studio time where and when he could.


Valleys of Neptune
is a chronicle of Jimi's studio experiments in 1969 and 70.  He seemed to have two goals: to perfect some of his earlier material (which he thought to be uneven) and to find a new musical direction.

The new CD contains examples of both - updated recordings of songs like Fire
, Red House and Stone Free along with studio renditions of live staples like Hear My Train A Comin' and Bleeding Heart combined with new material: Valleys of Neptune, Lullaby for the Summer, and Crying Blue.

The Valleys of Neptune radio special contains new interviews with Jimi's sister, Janie; his bass player and Army buddy, Billy Cox; his recording engineer, Eddie Kramer; his biographer, John McDermott; and Andy Fairweather Low who toured with Hendrix in 1967 and sings on the previously-unreleased version of Stone Free
.

These twelve previously-unreleased recordings help answer the question: where was Jimi headed next? 


The radio special provides a glimpse into a musical genius and gives listeners a behind-the-scenes look at some "new" recordings by the man who changed forever the electric guitar.

Tupperware

From The Kitchen Sisters | 05:47

Tupperware. More than a way of storing leftovers in covered plastic bowls, for many it's a way of life.

Ksisterstupperware_small "Somewhere in the world a Tupperware Party is held every ten seconds." Public television's "The American Experience" recently chronicled the history of Tupperware. But back in 1980, with only two other radio stories under their belts, The Kitchen Sisters produced this story about the icon of American plastic. Tupperware. More than a way of storing leftovers in covered plastic bowls, for many it's a way of life. Parties. Rallies. Sales sessions. Earl Tupper took the plastics he developed for WWII into post-war American kitchens. The Tupperware Party is one of the ways women came together to swap recipes and kitchen wisdom, get out of the house and support each other's entrepreneurial efforts.

The Mikie Show #2 Bunny and Boe

From Michael Carroll | Part of the The Mikie Show series | 28:00

Holy cow they ordered another show. Our first adventure: let's learn about gardening in the desert! Very different. Our friends Meanie the Clown and his sidekick Shocko stop by along with a cameo from The Hi There's. A quiz I know you'll guess, plus a new feature—the sound play, ooh I like it.

Cactus_small We take an adventure into the high Sonoran Desert to see what gardening in such a place is like. Bunny and Boe are very charming people and fill us in on water harvesting, predator awareness and more. The usual cast of characters stop by. PLus, don't forget tyhe sound quiz. The sound play is introduced in this episode: a short story told using only music and sound—listeners decide the plot.

Madoff Whistle-Blower: ‘No One Would Listen’

From Curt Nickisch | 13:13

Harry Markopolos tried for nearly ten years to expose Bernard Madoff and the world's largest Ponzi scheme, but it didn't do any good. Why didn’t anybody listen? Markopolos has now written a book.

But before the national tour, Curt Nickisch got the first radio interview with him, spoke to those who knew him, and tells his story.

0226_markopolos-revisited-book-sm_small Harry Markopolos, the man who tried futilely for 10 years to expose Bernard Madoff the largest Ponzi scheme in history, has written a book about his failed crusade.

“No One Would Listen: A True Financial Thriller” is being released March 2, 2010.  Markopolos is heading out on a national media tour to promote it.  He'll be on “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart,” the “Today” show, and a bunch of others.  Audible is making the first chapter of the audio book available as a free download.

But before the book tour, Curt Nickisch got the first radio interview with Markopolos, talked to people who knew him, and produced this story about the man who’s still coming to terms with the fact he’d always been right about Madoff, but it didn’t do any good.

Madoff became a national symbol for Wall Street greed. Markopolos, an ordinary-seeming if quirky finance whiz, has been harder to peg.  The story examines, just why was he the only one to figure it out? Why did he alone try so hard for years to expose the scam? Why didn’t anybody listen?