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Image by: Billy Alexander 

What are you doing for New Year's?

From: Afi-Odelia E. Scruggs
Length: 03:28

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A conversation from three folks on the rituals they've created to mark the first of the year. Read the full description.

2012_small When Afi Scruggs was a youngster, New Year's meant sparklers and a round fired from her dad's pistol. Now that she's older, she marks the first of the year in a quieter, safer way. And, she's noticed, her friends observe the passing of the year with their own rituals. She polled three of them - Marc Edelstein from Chicago, Sadiqa Starkey from suburban Cleveland, and Dianne Green from San Antonio - and came up with three very different ceremonies for New Year's Eve and New Year's Day.

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Piece Description

When Afi Scruggs was a youngster, New Year's meant sparklers and a round fired from her dad's pistol. Now that she's older, she marks the first of the year in a quieter, safer way. And, she's noticed, her friends observe the passing of the year with their own rituals. She polled three of them - Marc Edelstein from Chicago, Sadiqa Starkey from suburban Cleveland, and Dianne Green from San Antonio - and came up with three very different ceremonies for New Year's Eve and New Year's Day.

Intro and Outro

INTRO:

When independent producer Afi Scruggs was a youngster, New Year's meant sparklers and a round fired from her dad's pistol. Now that she's older, she's noticed her friends observe the passing of the year with their own rituals. She talked to three of them - Marc Edelstein from Chicago, Sadiqa Starkey from suburban Cleveland, and Dianne Green from San Antonio - and heard about three distinct practices for New Year's Eve and New Year's Day.

OUTRO:

You heard Sadiqa (sa-Dee-kah) Starkey of South Euclid, Ohio, Marc Edelstein of Chicago and Dianne Green of San Antonio talk about the ways they mark the final and first days of the year.