Caption: Duck eggs at Morning Owl Farm, Credit: Guy Hand
Image by: Guy Hand 
Duck eggs at Morning Owl Farm 

Balancing Ducks, Diversity and Dollars: The future of local food

From: Guy Hand
Series: Northwest Food News & Edible Idaho
Length: 04:00

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Producer Guy Hand visits a small-scale farmer who gave up a tenured university professorship in the wake of September 11th to grow local, organic food. But ten years into her new career, Mary Rohlfing's idealism hasn't countered a hard economic reality: small-scale, diversified farms are seldom profitable. She says it's a dilemma that clouds the future of the entire local food movement . Read the full description.

_dsc6001_small Producer Guy Hand visits a small-scale farmer who gave up a tenured university professorship in the wake of September 11th to grow local, organic food. But ten years into her new career, Mary Rohlfing's idealism hasn't countered a hard economic reality: small-scale, diversified farms are seldom profitable. She says it's a dilemma that clouds the future of the entire local food movement .

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Transcript

Duck Eggs
Edible Idaho Feature: 1223GH_DuckEggs.wav Feature 4:00 12/23/11 GH/
[HOST INTRO] This is Edible Idaho with Guy Hand, celebrating 2011: The Year of Idaho Food. (4:00 to soc out)
[SCRIPT]
(Owl Hoots) Rohlfing: There’s the one up there at the top of that tree. Can you see it’s outline?
Hand: It’s a cold, pre-dawn morning in December and Mary Rohlfing is pointing to the silhouette of a great horned owl in a tree on her Boise farm.
Rohlfing: Now that it’s getting a little bit lighter, you can see the bib under her. And she’s kind of the mother owl. Hand: And you named the farm for her? Rohlfing: Yeah, we did name the farm for her because in the morning I’d come out and hear the owls, just like we are this morning, so we named the farm Morning Owl Farm.
Hand: That was 10 years ago, shortly after the September 11th attacks. Rohlfing, a tenured professor at Boise State University a...
Read the full transcript

Related Website

http://www.nwfoodnews.com/2011/12/23/balancing-ducks-diversity-and-dollars-the-future-of-local-food/