Caption: By stevendepolo @ flickr
By stevendepolo @ flickr 

Sew Spot Sew

From: Youth Media Project
Length: 04:11

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"Sew Spot Sew" is an audio piece by Sergio Gonzales, who strongly advocates DYI -- Do It Yourself, a movement that began in the late '50s. Since then local stores have supplied DYIers with anything they might need. According to Sergio, DYI will avoid exploiting children from third world countries who are forced to make the new products we all buy. Read the full description.

Sew-spot-sew-150x100_small "Sew Spot Sew" is an audio piece by Sergio Gonzales, who strongly advocates DYI -- Do It Yourself, a movement that began in the late '50s. Since then local stores have supplied DYIers with anything they might need. According to Sergio, DYI will avoid exploiting children from third world countries who are forced to make the new products we all buy.

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Piece Description

"Sew Spot Sew" is an audio piece by Sergio Gonzales, who strongly advocates DYI -- Do It Yourself, a movement that began in the late '50s. Since then local stores have supplied DYIers with anything they might need. According to Sergio, DYI will avoid exploiting children from third world countries who are forced to make the new products we all buy.

3 Comments Atom Feed

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work spot work!

These words are still ringing in my ears. It’s easy to get caught up in consumerism these days especially when watching television, reading a magazine, or any other form of media. Sergio clearly states the ugly truth: America’s culture benefits from the exploitation of others. Anyone can point out a problem but it takes leadership and dedication to come up with a solution. Yes, what is going on is unjust and inhumane, but what can I do? Sergio mentions several projects and organizations that can help reduce the amount of things we consume and waste we produce. I just wish there was more detail about them in the piece and in the description.
As a country and as individuals we need to address our lifestyle and think about how it affects other people. Recently I got together with a group of friends and we had a DIY party. Everyone arrived with art supplies and a project in mind.
Artist Josiah McElheney speaks of consumerism in a recent interview and how we are brainwashed into buying things. He concludes that we can as individuals create something.
Josiah McElheny interview
http://icateens.org/video/interview-josiah-mcelheny
DIY blogs
http://honestlywtf.com/diy/
http://blog.freepeople.com/diy/

Caption: PRX default User image

waste not want not

those words ring true through your piece of work. It was wonderful to hear that the youth in this country will try to do this and nix the NAME BRAND. I made a swanky pair of bell bottoms for my daughter a few years ago. All her friends liked them, but, once she told them they were homemade they lost their lustre. Sadly. Yeay for you Sergio. You are keeping it simple and keeping it REAL.

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Surprising and informative

The opening to this feature on the Do It Yourself movement certainly catches the listener off-guard--but it made me listen through to the end of the piece. And Sergio makes a convincing case for the value of being in touch with the stuff we use in our daily lives. The tone is lyrical at times, almost like a spoken word piece. Sergio hits a more traditional public radio stride after two minutes and really drives his points home. But he takes a risky and very effective to catch our attention--and it works. This piece would be a good addition to a show on conservation, globalization, or thriftiness in tough economic times.

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