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Playlist: Listen Up! Audio for Educators

Compiled By: Listen Up! Audio for Educators

 Credit: Photo by Ayton
Image by: Photo by Ayton 

A collection of pieces to inspire teaching from every angle.

Chicagoans Consider Their Road Not Taken

From Curie Youth Radio | 01:53

A lovely piece from Armand Curtis of Curie Youth Radio that combines Frost's poem with three Chicagoans considering the choices they've made throughout their lives.

Aic_small Chicagoans recite Frost's  "The Road Not Taken" and talk about their choices, regrets, and victories.

And, How Does That Make You Feel?

From Blunt Youth Radio Project | 13:17

Kathleen Ross of Blunt Youth Radio uses radio drama and strong writing to explore teen suicide from an insider's perspective.

Default-piece-image-2 Winner of the 2003 NFCB Silver Reel for Radio Drama, Kathleen Ross' And, How Does That Make You Feel? takes a dramatic and experimental look at teen mental health. This piece originally aired on Blunt at WMPG in Portland, ME.

I Live In Martin Luther King Plaza; What About You?

From Curie Youth Radio | 02:42

Angela Griden of Curie Youth Radio's audio postcard with attitude.

Images_small A teen from Chicago takes you on a tour of a neighborhood that doesn't often get toured: King Plaza on Chicago's West Side.

Letter to My Mom: You Haven't Lost Me

From Curie Youth Radio | 02:21

Natalie Marquez of Curie Youth Radio on Chuck E. Cheese and mother/daughter estrangement.

Images_small Curie Youth Radio is a writing and radio production class at Curie High School on Chicago's Southwest side. Here, students create their own stories: fresh takes on everything from snowball fights to gang warfare. They see their stories as a way for teenagers in one Chicago high school to reach out to the rest of the world.

The Perfect Gift for the Five-Foot Basketball Player

From Curie Youth Radio | 01:33

Keith Shine's gift to his cousin: height.

Images_small Keith's cousin wants to be in the NBA, but he's five foot two. Keith gives him a birthday gift: a foot and a half of height. This audio gift is mixed with music and the sounds of a two-on-two basketball game.

Our Name is Rogelio Bautista

From KRCB Voice of Youth | 21:26

From the perspective of newspaper accounts and police reports, Rogelio Bautista died for a word, a color, a number, his death jotted down as just another statistic in our escalating gang war…but that’s not the perspective of the four narrators of the story “Our name is Rogelio Bautista.”

Default-piece-image-2 According to what his brother Sergio told the police, Rogelio Bautista was just walking to a party this past New Year’s Eve when someone across the street yelled “f--- SCRAPS!!”, scrap being the derogatory word that a Norteno gang member uses to insult a Sureno. From the perspective of newspaper accounts and police reports, Rogelio died for a word, a color, a number, his death jotted down as just another statistic in our escalating gang war…but that’s not the perspective of the four narrators of the story “Our name is Rogelio Bautista.” These four fourteen year old kids knew him as the cousin they’d crammed into a tiny apartment with, the kid who they played baseball with using cans as bases, the tough hero of their neighborhood...they narrate his story in the voice of this young man...

WUTB-Variation 5A -Quiet, Gentle Version

From David Green | Part of the We Used To Believe... series | 01:25

When you were younger, did you ever believe something which turned out not to be true? How about recently?
Producers Aliana and Sophie reveal the wide range of misconceptions children can hold.

3bwutb_small Working with a partner or on their own, the students of Third Grade Audio created “mini-audio collages” inspired by the topic, “We used to Believe…”  As they did their sound editing, students took into consideration: clip order, overlapping voices, background music, the use of silence, additional recorded narration or introductions and vocal effects while designing their mini-collages. While some groups started with the same set of audio clips, they produced mini-collages that were quite different from one another in terms of sound, mood, and narrative emphasis. The series could be viewed as “Variations on an Audio Theme.”

These mini-collages represent the most independent production work done by the students of Third Grade Audio posted on prx  thus far. They should be considered the primary producers of the pieces, with only minimal additional production (tweaking here and there, adjusting levels) done by David Green.

Third Grade Audio
“See” the world through third grade ears

Legal Emancipation

From Radio Rookies | 09:58

At 15 emancipation has brought both freedom and hardship for Radio Rookie Jordan Teklay. Now 17, he's trying to understand what it means to be an adult.

Jordanteklay_small At 15, Jordan Teklay became legally emancipated from his parents and moved on his own from California to New York City. Since then, he has been learning to juggle the responsibilities of work, school and taking care of himself. Emancipation has brought both freedom and hardship. Struggling to negotiate his path in the world, Jordan is trying to understand what it means to be an adult. HOST INTRO: Teenagers are famous for getting into conflicts with their parents over independence. Occasionally, that tension even leads to a separation of some kind--such as moving in with a relative or going into foster care. But Radio Rookie Jordan Teklay didn't want to be a part of anybody else's family. When the situation with his mom became unbearable, he sought his freedom through the courts.

Lunchroom

From David Green | Part of the School Scenes series | 02:16

Third grader Evan remembers the simple pleasures of first grade: blue sports drink.

Playing
Lunchroom
From
David Green

Default-piece-image-1 Evan relates the excitement of a group of seven-year-olds when they were finally allowed to have something other than milk or juice for lunch. Little did they know how fleeting this pleasure would turn out to be. This story was originally part of a site-specific audio tour of our school written and recorded by third graders. The stories recount school memories ranging from kindergarten to third grade which reference specific locations, landmarks and objects on campus. While these pieces were originally created to be listened to on-site, they can be enjoyed on their own as well. We also recommend that you listen using headphones.

Sex Without Condoms is the New Engagement Ring

From Youth Radio | Part of the Youth Radio's the Best of "What's the New What?" series | 03:03

Youth Radio's Pendarvis Harshaw says that for a lot of his friends, the transition from having sex with a condom to sex without, is seen as a symbolic "engagement."

Pendarvis2_small

Provocative yes, but balanced and interesting, this story commanded the top of NPR's most viewed list for the better part of a week and it sparked hundreds of online comments when it first aired.  While many listeners were angry and shocked, just as many were in agreement with Pendarvis' premise and thankful for real and honest youth reporting.

This story is part of Youth Radio's Best of What's the New What? series, which asks what new trends in youth culture are replacing old trends. In short: What's the New What?

Running from Myself

From 826NYC | 17:51

Louis struggles to reconcile bad choices he's made in the past.

Default-piece-image-2 For most of his high school career, Louis lived in a way that he later came to regret. This piece is his investigation into why he did what he did, what made him stop, and, most importantly, if he's really changed for good. Louis tells his story in a straight-forward and engaging manner, often using conversations and interviews conducted with various figures in his life.

Should I Stay or Should I Go (To the Prom)

From Blunt Youth Radio Project | 05:19

It's considered by many to be a rite of passage, but Blunt reporter David Barber-Callaghan isn't sure whether he wants to go to his senior prom. In search of advice he turns to his classmates, past graduates, and his own mother.

17167675bbe7ce0344b_small It's considered by many to be a rite of passage, but Blunt reporter David Barber-Callaghan isn't sure whether he wants to go to his senior prom. In search of advice he turns to his classmates, past graduates, and his own mother. Photo Credit: Wade Kelly

Glasnost

From outLoud Radio at Youth Radio | 06:54

Coming out to my immigrant parents wasn't exactly easy.

Alla_small When I was 12 years old, my mother once told me, "If you ever turn out to be a lesbian, I'll curse the day you were born." Parents say the darndest things.

Bi Chic

From outLoud Radio at Youth Radio | 06:56

Are bisexuals just "faking it"? An investigation.

Celiapr_small July 5, 2005. On the front page of the Science section of the New York Times, an article titled "Straight, Gay or Lying? Bisexuality Revisited" reports on a study that "casts doubt on whether true bisexuality exists, at least in men." Questions, doubts and misunderstanding run rife when it comes to bisexuality. Celia La Luz set out to enlighten herself about bisexuality, and learned a lot more than she expected.

BART Slaying Gives Oakland Rocky Start in '09

From Youth Outlook | 05:16

On New Years, most people were dancing and drinking a little too much champagne. Among the thousands of people celebrating that night was a young man named Oscar Grant whose life was tragically cut short

Default-piece-image-1 In the early hours of 2009, most people were ringing in the New Year, dancing at parties, and drinking a little too much champagne. Among the thousands of people celebrating that night was a young man named Oscar Grant, 22, who was probably looking forward to the New Year and all it could bring. But due to a tragedy, his New Year and his life was cut short. Donny Lumpkins is a content producer for YO! Youth Outlook Multimedia. Malcolm Marshall, Paul Billingsley, and Josue Rojas are producers for YO! Youth Outlook Multimedia

Growing Up in The System

From Radio Rookies | 11:42

WNYC Radio Rookie, Shirley Diaz's life has been shaped by the tragedy of her mother's murder and having been raised in several foster homes. To avoid being consumed by loss, Shirley tries to make sense of it all.

Shirleydiaz_small Radio Rookie Shirley Diaz's life has been shaped by the tragedy of her mother's murder and the difficulty of growing up in six different foster homes, separated from her six younger siblings. To avoid being consumed by loss, Shirley tries to make sense of these events and find refuge in home and family as she finds them. HOST INTRO: Radio Rookie Shirley Diaz is on the brink of aging out of the foster care system when she turns 21. Many young people face huge challenges when they leave the system. And a disproportionate number of New York City's 17,000 kids in foster care struggle with homelessness at some point in their lives. Braced for adulthood, Shirley whose nickname is Star looks to herself for support.

Alan Wolf

From SpiritHouse Inc/Youth Noise Network | Part of the Passionate Citizens series | 07:05

Alan Wolf stands on a street corner every Saturday, protesting the war.

Default-piece-image-1 Originally, my piece was going to be a profile of all the people who hang out on a particular downtown Durham street corner every Saturday, protesting the war. I went to these interviews a little exasperated with the downtown protest group, even though I'd never met any of them. Standing on a street corner seemed a very passive way of protesting, and one that obviously wasn't working. I still think it's going to take more to stop the war than holding a sign and hoping people read it, but making this piece helped me understand why Alan Wolf feels that he has to participate in this particular protest-- if he doesn't, who will?

Language Arts

From SpiritHouse Inc/Youth Noise Network | Part of the Passionate Citizens series | 05:45

Anya Sippen profiles Language Arts, a Durham-based hip-hop group

Default-piece-image-2 Language Arts is a Durham, North Carolina-based hip-hop group with members Aden Darrity, 24, and Pierce Freelon, 22. Through performances, workshops, and other activities, Language Arts teaches that civic involvement goes beyond community service and volunteer work ... and you don't have to be a politician either!

Young Drivers

From SpiritHouse Inc/Youth Noise Network | 10:46

This piece investigates the experiences of teen drivers and the adults who support them.

Default-piece-image-2 In Durham, North Carolina, like elsewhere around the country, teens get into accidents which often result in fatalities. Roll on a journey with Riverside High School junior Emmanuel Watson as he talks to brand new drivers. They tell him what they learned in drivers' ed, how their parents feel about them driving, stereotypes of teen drivers, and what are the main problems with teens driving. Everybody has something to say about this, including a member of law enforcement, a drivers' ed teacher, and parents of teen drivers, including his own mother, who tells Emmanuel, "I'm going to have faith that you can drive."

Standing Outside An Execution

From KRCB Voice of Youth | 11:00

On December 13, 2005, the state of California executed a man named Stanley "Tookie" Williams. Voice of Youth was there that night, outside San Quentin, among the crowd of thousands, and 19 year old Greg Shimada narrates his experience of the last four hours of Stanley Williams' life

Default-piece-image-2 On December 13, 2005, the state of California executed a man named Stanley "Tookie" Williams. To some this man was infamous as the co-founder of the notorious Crips street gang and an unrepentent, cold-blooded murderer of four people. To others this man was a man who had atoned for his contributions to gang warfare by brokering truces and preaching alternatives to gang life, and to others, he was both a man redeemed, and, in fact, a man innocent of the crime he would be paying for with his life. Voice of Youth was there that night, outside San Quentin, among the crowd of thousands, and nineteen-year old Greg Shimada narrates his experience of the last four hours of Stanley Williams' life.

Heroin

From Radio Rookies | 08:10

Janesse reports on her father's herion addiction.

Playing
Heroin
From
Radio Rookies

Janesselg_small Janesse Nieves says she and her mother have one thing in common -- they were both betrayed by Janesse's father. He left them for Heroin when she was only a school girl. Janesse takes her microphone to her father's house to try to convince him he should leave Heroin alone. But she can't convice him to stop. A clinical expert tells her there's nothing she can do, but she finds that hard to believe.

Boredom

From KBOO Youth Collective | 07:15

Dramatization of a summer day gone wrong

Default-piece-image-0 Braodcast on the "Summer" themed show of The Underground, the KBOO youth collective's monthly public affairs show. Broadcast initailly August 25, 2004, on KBOO Portland OR.

What We Wish We Could Tell Our Parents

From april winbun | 01:31

Mom, Dad: About That Bullet Hole in the Basement...

Cyr_small Through this vox-pop, the entire world gets to hear the secrets that teenagers will never reveal to their parents. Some samples: "I sell porn to students" "Mom, I love Dad more" "I want to be a writer" "I joined the Marines" "Sorry, Mom, but my sister smokes pot on a daily basis" "Every time I said I was at the library, I was actually..."

Josh's Diary, Part 1: Growing Up with Tourette's

From Radio Diaries | Part of the Teenage Diaries series | 12:25

Josh has Tourette's Syndrome, a neurological disorder that causes uncontrollable tics and involuntary verbal outbursts. "It feels like there's a big balloon inside my stomach. And the balloon keeps growing bigger and bigger, like every second extra the tic stays inside it feels like somebody blows up the balloon another notch, until I let it out."

This story is part of the Teenage Diaries series produced by Radio Diaries for NPR

Td_josh_003_sql_copy_small Josh has Tourette's Syndrome, a neurological disorder that causes uncontrollable tics and involuntary verbal outbursts. "It feels like there's a big balloon inside my stomach. And the balloon keeps growing bigger and bigger, like every second extra the tic stays inside it feels like somebody blows up the balloon another notch, until I let it out."

This story is part of the Teenage Diaries series  produced by Radio Diaries for NPR. Since 1996, Executive Producer Joe Richman has been giving tape recorders to young people around the country to document their lives. In December of 2012, Radio Diaries will revisit five of the original diarists 16 years after their first recordings. The series is broadcast on NPR's All Things Considered.  

Dressy Girls

From SpiritHouse Inc/Youth Noise Network | 08:10

An investigation of self-esteem, skanks, and the clothing of high fashion highschool girls.

Default-piece-image-0 Lena Eckert-Erdheim interviews a group of fashion-conscious highschool girls about the connections between what they wear, self-esteem, body image, and their relationships with boys and other girls.

Auditorium

From David Green | 02:49

A third grader recalls an unusual problem he had during an assembly when he was in first grade.

Playing
Auditorium
From
David Green

Default-piece-image-2 Chris recalls the complications which ensue when a seven-year-old's curiosity and impulsiveness combine with an inclination to follow the rules. Ultimately, a bit of first grade ingenuity solves the problem. This story was originally part of a site-specific audio tour of our school written and recorded by third graders. The stories recount school memories ranging from kindergarten to third grade which reference specific locations, landmarks and objects on campus. While these pieces were originally created to be listened to on-site, they can be enjoyed on their own as well. We also recommend that you listen using headphones.

Joey Interviews a Cutter

From Blunt Youth Radio Project | Part of the Incarcerated Youth Speak Out series | 04:23

Joey from the Long Creek Youth Development Center (LCYDC) interviews a cutter.

Lcydcfenceedit_small

What is the motivation behind self-mutilation? Listen as Joey from the Long Creek Youth Development Center (LCYDC) interviews a cutter.