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Playlist: O'Dark 30 episode 93 (2-41)

Compiled By: KUT

Caption: PRX default Playlist image

KUT's O’Dark 30 remembers 9/11 this week as we once again bring you the very best from the world of independent radio production this week. Every Sunday at midnight on Austin's KUT 90.5 and also at 4pm on digital KUT2 we present 3 hours of a little bit of everything from the world of independent radio production.

Episode 93(2-41)includes John Pierson's Master Class with SXSW Film's producer and head programmer Janet Pierson...Living Nine Eleven...KUT's Portrait of an Artist with Rino Pizzi...The Sonic Memorial Project...Visiting Ground Zero, 2011...Untouchable Music School

Living Nine Eleven

From WNYC | Part of the WNYC 9/11 Anniversary Programming series | 59:00

Ten years after the terrorist attacks of September 11th, as part of WNYC's "Decade: 9/11" coverage, this special explores people's most visceral and immediate emotional reactions to the attack on the World Trade Center and how they are - and are not -- still with us today.

Playing
Living Nine Eleven
From
WNYC

Wtc_jurfon_small Ten years after the terrorist attacks of September 11th,  as part of WNYC's "Decade: 9/11" coverage, this special explores New Yorkers' most visceral and immediate emotional reactions to the attack on the World Trade Center and how they are - and are not -- still with us today.

Fear and shock, grief and guilt, anger, gratitude and solidarity -- these emotions overwhelmed many New Yorkers along with the billowing cloud of smoke and debris after the Towers collapsed.

WNYC's award-winning news team spent days, months, and then years reporting on the attacks and their aftermath. Through a mix of their recordings at the time and interviews with people ten years later, WNYC reporter Marianne McCune guides us through the stories of people who were directly impacted by what happened and have been struggling for a decade to make sense of it.

For more on WNYC's "Decade Nine Eleven" project, please visit our website:
http://www.wnyc.org/series/911-tenth-anniversary/

The Sonic Memorial Project

From The Kitchen Sisters | 59:01

To commemorate the tenth Anniversary of 9/11 we bring you the Peabody Award-winning Sonic Memorial Project, narrated by New York writer Paul Auster. The Sonic Memorial Project is an intimate and historic documentary commemorating the life and history of The World Trade Center and its surrounding neighborhood, through audio artifacts, rare recordings, voicemail messages and interviews.

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To commemorate the tenth Anniversary of 9/11 we bring you the Peabody Award-winning Sonic Memorial Project, narrated by New York writer Paul Auster. The Sonic Memorial Project is an intimate and historic documentary commemorating the life and history of The World Trade Center and its surrounding neighborhood, through audio artifacts, rare recordings, voicemail messages and interviews. 

Ten years ago, in the months following 9/11, a collaboration of producers, listeners and public radio stations across the nation came together to create a Sonic Memorial to the people and history of the World Trade Center. We opened up a phone line at NPR and asked people to share their stories. We put out the call for audio artifacts that captured the sounds and voices of the World Trade Center neighborhood. Some thousand people called in creating a remarkable archive of personal recordings and remembrances. From this material and hundreds of hours of interviews and archival recordings gathered by producers around the country The Sonic Memorial Project was crafted.

Artists, bankers, office staff, elevator and maintenance workers—each tower had a thousand sounds; every floor had a thousand stories. The Sonic Memorial Project gathers some of these in a reflection and richly textured document of this moment in our history. We hear from the architect and engineer of the Towers, the piano player from Windows on the World, aerialist Philippe Petit who walked on a high-wire between the buildings 105 floors up. We hear from artists who had studios in the World Trade Center, creators of music and soundscapes based on recordings from the Towers. We hear the stories and remembrances of some of the many who died. 

The Sonic Memorial Project also features stories that focus on little known aspects of the life and history of the World Trade Center and surrounding neighborhood, including Radio Row: The Neighborhood Before The WTC, the district of electronic shops displaced by the building of the WTC. The Building Stewardesses: Construction Guides at The WTC and Other Little Known Tales of The Creation of The Towers 1968-1971: stories of the politics and public opinion surrounding the Towers are told by the man who masterminded the construction of the buildings and by the young college co-ed construction guides he hired to educate the public and put a friendly face on the project.  

The Sonic Memorial Project was produced by The Kitchen Sisters (Davia Nelson & Nikki Silva) in collaboration with NPR, independent radio producers, writers, archivists, historians and public radio listeners throughout the country.

 

Visiting Ground Zero, 2001

From Jake Warga | 07:10

A personal essay (accented with music) about looking for the perfect place to leave a flower in remembrance at Ground Zero 3mo later.

Wtc_medium_small Timeless (Same as the Holiday story but with Christmas mentions removed)

Untouchable Music School

From World Vision Report | Part of the Stories from the World Vision Report series | 06:01

The Merasi are a group of Untouchables, the lowest caste in India. They've been singing and playing music for higher caste patrons for the past 2,000 years. The songs are mystical, and mesmerizing. And they're in danger of dying out. Now, there’s an effort to keep them alive. Independent producer Adam Pogoff has this commentary.

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If you air this piece, please include a back announce saying "This piece originally aired on the World Vision Report." or "This piece came to us from the World Vision Report."