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Playlist: The Best Youth-Made Radio of 2010

Compiled By: PRX Administrator

 Credit: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/51374547@N00/404486009/">uckhet</a>
Image by: uckhet 
Curated Playlist

From Generation PRX, a division of PRX that is all about youth-produced radio, the finest stories from young people of the last year.

Playlist curated by GPRX Director Jones Franzel, with input from the youth radio community. Learn more at generation.prx.org

Different, Not Disabled: The Perception of My Mind

From WHJE | 05:47

Aspergers, in my opinion, has always been misunderstood due to it being a medical "condition." When you listen to this, I ask that you go in with an open mind, and try to imagine the best you can. I promise I'll try my best to explain what it is like to be...well, me.

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Aspergers, in my opinion, has always been misunderstood due to it being a medical "condition." People look in and try to explain something from what they see, and the behaviors they observe from the outside.

I've thought of many reasons as to what Aspergers is in a medical field, reaching concepts and ideas ranging as far as: "The mind's tendency to drop below correct brainwave frequencies and drop into a hyper-focused state."

But even my own theories fail to portray what it's like. As the cliché goes, "don't judge a book by its cover." That is all that is achieved by these studies. With information people obtained from face value, trying to figure out kids with conditions such as mine becomes a goal of trying to figure out English with algebra.

So, taking a bound away from logic, I've gone and explored my own mind, and what I found is something that can't be told, it needs to be experienced. When you listen to this, I ask that you go in with an open mind, and try to imagine the best you can. I promise I'll try my best to explain what it is like to be... well, me.



MPR News' Youth Radio Series (Series)

Produced by Sasha Aslanian

MPR's Youth Radio Series pairs high school and college-age reporters from diverse backgrounds with an experienced MPR producer to create compelling stories for MPR News.

Most recent piece in this series:

Homelessness: It Could Happen to Anyone, Even My Dad

From Blunt Youth Radio Project | 04:17

When Blunt member Iris SanGiovanni was eight years old, her dad became homeless for six months after her parents divorced. A few years later, she had the chance to talk with him about his experience.

Iris_and_robert_002_small When Blunt member Iris SanGiovanni was eight years old, her dad became homeless for six months after her parents divorced. A few years later, she had the chance to talk with him about his experience. 

Schooled: Teens' Stories About American Public Education

From KUOW | Part of the Curated Youth Radio Programs from KUOW and Generation PRX series | 55:59

Teens talk about standards, inequality, and getting out of public high school in America.

Schooled is one hour of some of the best youth radio stories on PRX. The show is produced by KUOW's Jenny Asarnow with support from Generation PRX. Our host is Amina Al-Sadi, a 20-year-old senior at the University of Washington.

Claudia_200_small Adults in the White House, Congress, think tanks, principals’ offices, teachers’ unions, and other Very Important Positions are fighting over how to educate kids. But what do teenagers think about the education we’re getting?

This hour, we take you back to school – public high school, to be precise.

Teenagers share our stories, in our words.

We dissect school standards that are too hard, or too easy. We get educated in an unequal public school system, and make decisions for what comes next after high school.

Stories in the program:

1. Amon "AJ" Frazier, 'Promotion In Doubt' WNYC's Radio Rookies http://www.prx.org/pieces/46796-promotion-in-doubt

Amon 'AJ' Frazier was trying to get through eighth grade when New York City's Department of Education made it harder to move up to the next grade. AJ wasn't sure he could pass, but as he found out, the new standards were more flexible than they seemed. AJ created this story for WNYC's "Radio Rookies" when he was 14 years old.

2. Libby Donovan, 'These Kids Didn't Want To Be There, And I Did' (Orig. 'I Was a Slacker in the Top Ten'), Blunt Youth Radio Project http://www.prx.org/pieces/46381-i-was-a-slacker-in-the-top-10

Many American high schools put students in 'tracks' based on academic achievement. But at South Portland High School in Maine, students of all abilities were mixed together in the classroom. Libby Donovan was not pleased. She made this story when she was 19, for the Blunt Youth Radio Project.

3. Amanda Wells, 'The Night I Met Jonathan Kozol,' KRCB Voice of Youth http://www.prx.org/pieces/18445-the-night-i-met-jonathan-kozol

Let's go on a field trip with Amanda Wells, age 17. She saw Jonathan Kozol speak at Sonoma State University in 2005. Kozol has documented and criticized "the restoration of apartheid schooling in America." Amanda asks how she — a white girl — could help end racial separation. She made this story for KRCB Voice of Youth.

4. Erika Ortiz, Paul Roldan, and Alca Usan, 'Where Were You Fifth Period?,' Curie Youth Radio http://www.prx.org/pieces/10160-where-were-you-fifth-period

Time for a quiz. Why do students cut class? Is it because: A.Their pants are wet. B. They're tired. C. They got engaged on lunch break.

Erika Ortiz, Paul Roldan, and Alca Usan get answers from students at Curie High School on the Southwest Side of Chicago. They made this story for Curie Youth Radio.

5. Sam Pearson, 'Sam Drops Out,' Youth Media Project http://www.prx.org/pieces/46483-sam-drops-out

Sam Pearson was a student at Monte Del Sol Charter School in Santa Fe, NM. He didn't want to be in high school anymore. So he dropped out. Sam made this story in 2010 when he was 17 years old, for the Youth Media Project in Santa Fe.

6. Caitlin Garing, 'Life After High School,' Alaska Teen Media Institute http://www.prx.org/pieces/4662-think-piece-on-life-after-high-school

More than a third of public high school graduates don't go to college. One anxious mother doesn't know what her son plans to do. So she hires a hard–boiled private detective to find out. Caitlin Garing was a senior in high school when she created this noir–inspired radio play for the Alaska Teen Media Institute.

7. Lena Eckert–Erdheim, 'Making It Out Of High School' Youth Noise Network http://www.prx.org/pieces/17755-making-it-out-of-high-school

Lena Eckert–Erdheim asked fellow seniors at Durham School of the Arts what they planned to do after high school. Go to college or become a hobo? Hmm, tough choice. Lena made this story for Youth Noise Network (YNN) at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. YNN is now part of SpiritHouse. (Lena went to college.)

8. Tirhas Kibrzghi, 'Students Vs. SATs' WAMU's Youth Voices http://www.prx.org/pieces/26721-students-vs-sats

Each year, the SAT test strikes fear into the hearts of about 1.5 million high school students. Colleges use SAT scores to make admissions decisions, but many high school students say the test carries too much weight. WAMU's Youth Voices reporter Tirhas Kibrzghi takes us inside a testing center near Washington, DC.

9. Claudia Villa, 'The Kids Who Got Out: My Graduation Day' KRCB Voice of Youth http://www.prx.org/pieces/11654-the-kids-who-got-out-my-graduation-day

We spend graduation day with Claudia Villa. She went to the Clean and Sober school for kids with substance abuse issues, and graduated with teen moms, probation camp kids, and the rest of Sonoma County's Alternative Ed class of 2006. Claudia made this story when she was 18 years old for KRCB Voice of Youth.

Santa Kidnapped: A Radio Rootz Radio Drama Parody

From Radio Rootz | 05:28

This short Christmas parody tells the REAL story of what happened to Santa.

Santa_kidnapped_thumb_small A holiday radio drama and parody about a sleuth who investigates Santa's disappearance, featuring many famous cameos including Mickey Mouse and the Soul Train. The original Christmas Carol is Scrooge's story, this is a new Christmas classic for all to enjoy. Co-written and co-produced by students at Manhattan Comprehensive Night and Day High School.

I Didn't Know That (You Were a Muslim)

From Tali Singer | 02:55

A portrait of how a recent college graduate came to Islam, and the story of what happened when her parents found out she'd converted.
This piece was produced for the 2010 Third Coast ShortDocs Challenge.

Bethbowman_small When Beth first started college, she knew she was interested in Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies. But when she began taking classes, she found she was more interested in the spirituality of Islam than its politics. Then, in 2008, this 6-foot-tall, Irish-Catholic girl from upstate New York made the decision to convert. This story is a short portrait of Beth's spiritual journey.

“Last Words” from Hopi High

From Youth Radio | 05:35

Most Hopi teens can’t fluently speak their language, and without it they cannot carry on Hopi traditions and culture. This puts Hopi teens in a tricky position – to either learn the Hopi language and preserve their ancient culture, or to abandon their culture and adopt a modern way of life.

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Most Hopi teens can’t fluently speak their language, and without it they cannot carry on Hopi traditions and culture. This puts Hopi teens in a tricky position – to either learn the Hopi language and preserve their ancient culture, or to abandon their culture and adopt a modern way of life.

We Didn't Write a Team Peace by Team Kuumba Lynx

From WBEZ | Part of the Louder Than a Bomb 2010 series | 02:54

Team Kuumba Lynx says this piece is about the pressure of creating a group poetry piece within the context of maintaining everyday teen responsibilities. Kuumba Lynx is an arts-in-education, not-for-profit organization. Team members are Paula "Lala" Bolander, John "Vietnam" Nguyen, Darius Parker, and Gina Gonzalez. Finalists in the 2010 Louder than a Bomb Teen Poetry Slam, Kuumba Lynx has participated in the slam every year since LTAB's founding in 2001.

Ltab2010_team-kuumbalynx-tp_small Team Kuumba Lynx says this piece is about the pressure of creating a group piece within the context of maintaining everyday teen responsibilities.  Kuumba Lynx is an arts-in-education, not-for-profit organization.  Team members are Paula "Lala" Bolander, John "Vietnam" Nguyen, Darius Parker, and Gina Gonzalez. Finalists in the 2010 Louder than a Bomb Teen Poetry Slam, Kuumba Lynx has participated in the slam every year since LTAB's founding in 2001.   The team is coached by Jacinda Bullie and Jaquanda Villegas.

My Best Friend is Purple

From City High Radio | 05:33

Seventeen-year-old producer A. Greene doesn't care if you think it's strange that she finds life easier in the company of her purple stuffed rabbit, Grape Jelly.

Grape_jelly_small A is seventeen years old, and she doesn't care if you think it's strange that she finds life easier in the company of her purple stuffed rabbit, Grape Jelly.
This is a sweet, simple love story. The producer wrote and recorded all the ukulele music in this piece herself!

What would be your perfect date?

From Alaska Teen Media Institute | 01:48

Going for a jog, a night at the arcade, painting? What's your perfect date?

Default-piece-image-1 With Valentines Day approaching the Alaska Teen Media Institute wanted to know what people in the community thought of as their perfect date! Enjoy!!

Peculiar Privilege and the Elegy

From Littleglobe | 07:44

Ece Ergadöz, a Turkish student at the United World College, explores her relationship with her mixed ethnic roots.

Flydime_small Ece Ergadöz, a Turkish student at the United World College in Montezuma, New Mexico, explores her relationship with her mixed Turkish ethnic roots: half Kurdish and half Laz, she finds that she has somehow escaped being subjected to the prejudice facing her ethnic minority friends from other countries.

An Unexpected Life

From Littleglobe | 02:25

A teen discovers he's going to be a dad.

Dad_small Patrick Chavez was the son of teenagers and now finds himself repeating the pattern. In this portrait, Patrick illustrates his challenges and realizations as his next steps in life are the biggest motivators; his own new family.

Someone to Tuck Me In

From Radio Rookies | 09:54

Last year at a routine check-up, 15-year-old Raymond Henderson decided to tell the truth. When his doctor noticed bruises on his neck, Raymond admitted that his stepfather was abusing him.

Raymondhenderson_small Last year at a routine check-up, 15-year-old Raymond Henderson decided to tell the truth. When his doctor noticed bruises on his neck, Raymond admitted that his stepfather was abusing him. The Administration for Children's Services took Raymond and his sister Monica from their step-dad who’d raised them since their mother's death 13 years ago. Now they’re living with Ophelia, the home health attendant who cared for their mother as she was dying. Ophelia wants to give Raymond and Monica a permanent home. But faced with a decision that could shape his entire future, Raymond isn't sure. He worries that letting Ophelia adopt him would mean cutting ties with his old life and family.

The Most Magical Thing

From City High Radio | 03:20

Grace asks students and teachers at her school, "What is the most magical thing that ever happened to you?"

Default-piece-image-0 Grace asks students and teachers at her school, "What is the most magical thing that ever happened to you?"

Doomsday Theories: Extraterrestrials

From Terrascope Youth Radio | 03:53

Is the end of the earth at hand? How will it happen? Terrascope Youth Radio reporters Eitan Stern-Robbins and Alexandros Zervos talk to MIT Professor Sara Seager about the possibility of extraterrestrial life.

0210high_reztyr_logo-zigzag-350px_small What environmental catastrophes could spell doom for the earth as we know it?  In this first part of a Doomsday Theories series, Terrascope Youth Radio reporters explore the possibility of the existence of other life forms.

Is There Such a Thing as "Good" Hair?

From KFAI | Part of the KFAI Youth News series | 06:03

Stephanie Perry notices that her North Minneapolis neighborhood features hair braiding shops on nearly every corner and asks: Why do African American women cover their natural hair? From the KFAI Youth News Initiative, which creates a platform for young women of color to give their unique perspective on issues they face in their communities.

Yni_2010_photos_130_2__small It is not uncommon for women from all cultures to fret about their hair. KFAI Intern Stephanie Perry takes a special look into why so many African American women in her neighborhood choose to disguise their natural hair with a variety of cover-ups.

Stephanie Perry is a senior at the FAIR school in downtown Minneapolis.  This is Stephanie’s second year participating in the Youth News Initiative.  She is interested in studying journalism or accounting in college.

Paige Rawl: A peer sex educator

From Y-Press | Part of the Youth and health care series | 02:53

According to the Centers for Disease Control, one in every four sexually active teenagers will contract a sexually transmitted disease. Fifteen-year-old Paige Rawl is a peer sex educator and has been HIV positive since birth. She talks about how she’s trying to make a difference among her peers.

Cowwgirl_small

Each year there’s almost four million cases of sexually transmitted infections among teenagers. According to the Centers for Disease STI’s have increased dramatically in the  last few years.  Y-Press journalist Samantha Swan spoke with 16-year-old Paige Rawl; she’s a peer sex educator and has been HIV positive since birth. She has found it’s sometimes easier for kids to learn and talk about sexually transmitted infections from their peers.

Rap Resume

From Youth Radio | 02:22

King Anyi Howell shares his take on the newest addition to a rapper’s resume: jail time. He has a big problem with instantly making just any ole’ rapper out to be a political prisoner.

Playing
Rap Resume
From
Youth Radio

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King Anyi Howell shares his take on the newest addition to a rapper’s resume: jail time. He has a big problem with instantly making just any ole’ rapper out to be a political prisoner.

Mr. Hsu Comes Out

From outLoud Radio at Youth Radio | 06:26

"My father took me to a strip club to turn me straight...". A touching memoir of rejection, acceptance and forgiveness in Mr. Hsu's third period geometry class.

Img_5925_small "My father took me to a strip club to turn me straight...". A touching memoir of rejection, acceptance and forgiveness in Mr. Hsu's third period geometry class. Produced through the outLoud Radio Youth Stories Program.