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Playlist: New Zealand 2011

Compiled By: WNJR

Wellington Harbour from Matiu Island Credit: Lauren Panton
Image by: Lauren Panton 
Wellington Harbour from Matiu Island

Listening assignments for Cultural Diversity and Radio in Aotearoa/New Zealand, a Washington & Jefferson College January travel course. (Sign-up for a free account to hear the pieces in their entirety.)

Artful Radio

Dressy Girls

From SpiritHouse Inc/Youth Noise Network | 08:10

An investigation of self-esteem, skanks, and the clothing of high fashion highschool girls.

Default-piece-image-2 Lena Eckert-Erdheim interviews a group of fashion-conscious highschool girls about the connections between what they wear, self-esteem, body image, and their relationships with boys and other girls.

HV017- No Place Like Home

From Hearing Voices | Part of the Hearing Voices series | 54:00

Shifts in Time & Towns

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Host: Scott Carrier of Hearing Voices

The places we live and the people who live there; a desert, a city, two small towns, and another country:

Host Scott Carrier has a cultural history of the Great Salt Lake's "West Desert," a land of polygymists, bombing ranges, and toxic waste incinerators. There's chlorine gas in the air, anthrax stored underground, and people who call the place home.

Sarah Vowell's childhood move from rural Oklahoma to small-town Montana was, for her, a change from the middle ages to a modern metropolis.

Also, two Stories from the Heart of the Land: NYC native Natalie Edwards hates grass, bugs, dirt, and trees, but attempts a walk thru Brooklyn's Prospect Park; and Carmen Delzell tells why she moved to and has stayed in Mexico.

Tell Me WAI

From Homelands Productions | Part of the Worlds of Difference series | 03:54

To the sounds of Maori-influenced dance and techno music, musicians Mina Ripia and Maaka McGregor speak about their desire to move their culture forward rather than leave it behind. A tightly edited, non-narrated piece by producer Dmae Roberts.

Waiconch_small Dmae Roberts spent a month in beautiful Aotearoa in New Zealand, touring Maori towns and attending traditional performances and concerts. What stood out, she says, was the palpable sense of pride felt by both performers and audiences. It seemed a new pride, fresh and hopeful. And in fact she learned that it was new, having emerged largely after the Maori language became "official" in 1987. Dmae was especially impressed by how the revival of the language and the resurgence of interest in Maori traditions had not just boosted the morale of the Maoris, but of white New Zealanders as well. Everywhere in New Zealand, Maori is present alongside English in street signs, in advertising and on television. Every New Zealander she met used the Maori phrase kia ora an all-purpose greeting, goodbye and exclamation. Her piece features a couple, Mina Ripia and Maaka McGregor, who have toured the world playing modern popular music influenced by traditional Maori chants and rhythms. Image: Maaka McGregor and Mina Ripia

Tell Me Wai

From Dmae Roberts | 06:11

Maori group called 'Wai" blends traditions with a hip hop sound in New Zealand.

Playing
Tell Me Wai
From
Dmae Roberts

Wai_small I've been interested in Maori culture since I saw my first Tiki jade pendant and wondered about the story behind the symbolic carving. The movie "Whale Rider" further sharpened my desire to visit New Zealand and learn more about the Maoris. In 2003, I spent a month in beautiful Aotearoa (the Maori name for New Zealand means "land of the long white cloud"). I toured Maori towns and went to traditional performances and concerts. What stood out was the palpable sense of pride felt by both performers and audiences. It seemed a new pride, fresh and hopeful. And in fact I learned that it was new, having emerged largely after the Maori language became "official" in 1987. It is against that backdrop that I discovered WAI. The name means "water" in Maori. Many contemporary New Zealand groups sing in Maori, but WAI does it expressly with the mission of passing on the language on to the young. I heard their CD and knew I had to contact them. Mina Ripia and Maaka McGregor of Wai welcomed me into their home on Titahi Bay near Wellington, the capital of New Zealand. They told me that they'd only learned to speak Maori in college. They had been part of the English-language music scene before they decided to sing strictly in the language of their ancestors. When I asked Mina to identify herself she launched into a long recitation of the names of those ancestors, ending with her own name as the latest descendent. Maaka took a 200-year-old conch shell that had been soaking in the bathtub and played it like a trumpet. They use the shell to begin their shows. Then comes the electronica, which seems to grow organically from beats of the poi?balls on strings that they swing so they hit each other in rhythmic patterns. This piece is a collage explaining their music as they perform. A shorter piece originally aired on as part of of Homelands Productions' Worlds of Difference series on NPR's Day To Day.

Crows-Songbirds-Melt

From Dacia Herbulock | Part of the Weather Permitting (Interstitials) series | 01:06

Sound composition -- From winter to thaw and back again

Ice_small From a series of audio collages on the theme of weather and the seasons. This piece follows a man walking in the snow as he pauses, imagining spring, then returns to cold reality.


Documentary Tips

#11 - Dissecting "Dead Animal Man"

From Salt Institute for Documentary Studies | Part of the SaltCast: the Backstory to Great Radio Storytelling series | 27:42

On this Saltcast, we listen to “Dead Animal Man” by Ira Glass the whole way through, then play it again and dissect it. Get out your radio notebook, this piece is full of radio goodness.

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Probably my favorite piece to play in radio class at Salt to prompt discussion is “Dead Animal Man” by Ira Glass. It sets the bar high for feature production.

On this Saltcast, we listen to “Dead Animal Man” the whole way through then play it again and dissect it. Get out your radio notebook, this piece is full of radio goodness.

#19 - Studs, Natasha, and the Power of Sound

From Salt Institute for Documentary Studies | Part of the SaltCast: the Backstory to Great Radio Storytelling series | 08:54

Here are a few thoughts I have on the power of sound. Studs Terkel offers his take on the human voice. And, Salt radio grad Natasha Haverty talks about sound at death.

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At the start of the semester at Salt, we start big, really big.

After listening to a few radio pieces and introducing ourselves, we talk about sound. The power of sound. The conversation ranges from the practical to the spiritual. It’s poetic..

Here are a few thoughts I have on the power of sound. Studs Terkel offers his take on the human voice. And, Salt radio grad Natasha Haverty talks about sound at death.

#22 - What If?

From Salt Institute for Documentary Studies | Part of the SaltCast: the Backstory to Great Radio Storytelling series | 12:49

Radio producer Joe Richman says when producing a radio story you “cast” for characters. Here’s one thing to look for when “casting” your story: a character going through transition, someone who is progressing from one place to another.

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Radio producer Joe Richman says when producing a radio story you “cast” for characters. It’s like “trying” people out.  You look for people who know the subject matter and who are “radiophonic” — they sound good on the radio.

Here’s another thing to look for when “casting” your story: a character going through transition, someone who is progressing from one place to another. Could be an emotional place, a physical place — something where the character evolves or is at a point of change.

Salt radio student Katie Freddoso found all three of these character elements when she met teenage brothers Kevin and James Hatch in 2005. They knew the subject matter, the were animated and spoke well, and they were in transition — Kevin and James were going deaf. Katie spent several weeks with the boys, documenting part of their journey from the hearing world to the non-hearing world. Take a listen.

#24 - Cody Appleseed

From Salt Institute for Documentary Studies | Part of the SaltCast: the Backstory to Great Radio Storytelling series | 11:23

One of the ways good radio stories paint pictures is with ambient sound and active tape. Ambient sound is the general, background sound of a place. Active tape is a recording of someone doing something. Put those two together creatively and radio becomes cinematic.

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Allison Swaim gets sound. Pun intended.

She understands it and she knows how to record it to tell a story.

In the fall of 2008, Allison produced a piece about a guerrilla gardener — a guy named Cody who illegally plants trees on an island off the coast of Maine. Allison had a knack for getting her mic in all the right places. She collected great sound of Cody canoeing, hiking, planting trees, and getting dirty. Then, she used the recordings to paint a vivid picture of his work.

Producer Robert Krulwich once said “In radio, the listener is a co-author.”  What he means is that because there are no pictures, listeners are free to create their own images when they listen to the radio.

One of the ways good radio stories paint pictures is with ambient sound and active tape. Ambient sound is the general, background sound of a place. Active tape is a recording of someone doing something. Put those two together creatively and radio becomes cinematic.

See for yourself. Take a listen to Allison Swaim’s “Cody Appleseed.”

#30 - Look Me In the Eye

From Salt Institute for Documentary Studies | Part of the SaltCast: the Backstory to Great Radio Storytelling series | 12:51

On this Saltcast, producer and former Salt student Sarah Reynolds offers up a few interviewing tips to help with the production of non-narrated stories. We’ll also take a listen to her story “Look Me In The Eye” about Bill Buffard, a quadriplegic rugby player.

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I really, really like non-narrated radio stories — pieces that don’t have a reporter telling the story. Without a narrator, it’s like the characters are talking directly to the listener.

Unfortunately, you don’t hear many non-narrated stories on the radio and there’s a reason for that. They are insanely hard to produce.

Generally speaking, it’s a whole lot easier to produce a story with a narrator. They are the guide that holds the story together. Take away the narrator and you’ve got a lot of holes to fill.

On this Saltcast, producer and former Salt student Sarah Reynolds offers up a few interviewing tips to help with the production of non-narrated stories. We’ll also take a listen to her story “Look Me In The Eye” about Bill Buffard, a quadriplegic rugby player.

#31 - Why Is It So Hard to Read Aloud?

From Salt Institute for Documentary Studies | Part of the SaltCast: the Backstory to Great Radio Storytelling series | 13:42

On this Saltcast, it’s all about narration. I offer a few tips for improving narration and we listen to two pieces.

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I talk every single day and I sound natural when I do. So, why, when I read narration, does “natural Rob” disappear?

Makes no sense, right? I should be able to just open my mouth, speak, and sound like I always do — a coherent, engaged version of myself, but me. Instead, I have to work really hard to sound something close to natural when I read aloud.

On this Saltcast, it’s all about narration. I offer a few tips for improving narration and we listen to two pieces. The first is the opening scene to “Malaga Island: A Story Best Left Untold.” The second is “Blind Dog” by Scott Carrier.


Culture

The State We're In: Columbus Day Special

From Radio Netherlands Worldwide | 53:29

Columbus Day special on the rights of indigenous peoples

Smalltswipicture_small This week on The State Were In, we mark Colombus Day by looking at the rights of indigenous peoples. We hear about the struggle of the people of the Chagos Islands to return home, the rights of Mohawk women, the Maoris, Inuits, and Berbers.

Bowie's Waiata

From Sam Coley | 20:48

This documentary looks back at the 25th Anniversary of David Bowie's "Serious Moonlight" visit to New Zealand. It recounts Bowie being welcomed by a tribe of Maori's and features a short, previously unheard, Bowie composition.

Playing
Bowie's Waiata
From
Sam Coley

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In 1983 David Bowie was enjoying the biggest success of his career… The album “Let Dance” had gone to number one around the world and the subsequent “Serious Moonlight” tour was playing to huge, record breaking audiences. The show finally travelled down the South Pacific, reaching New Zealand in November 1983. Shortly before his first concert in Wellington, Bowie was invited to visit Takapuwahia Marae in Porirua (a sacred meeting place of the native Maori's). Becoming the first bonafide rock star to be officially welcomed onto a Maori Marae. 25 years later – members of the Ngati Toa tribe and professionals involved in the tour look back on the event that Bowie himself called…  “One of the most hospitable experiences of my life”… This documentary features a short exclusive song that Bowie wrote especially for the occasion entitled “Waiata” (a previously unheard original Bowie composition!) – as well as the reaction of Bowie backing singer Frank Simms after hearing a recording of the song played back to him for the first time in 25 years. Other contributors include legendary NZ music promoter Hugh Lynn, as well as Lenny Pickett, the musical director of “Saturday Night Live” in New York, who played saxophone on the Serious Moonlight tour. (Additional music written and recorded by Joff Winks www.joffwinksband.com )

A Piece of Paradise

From Sean Kelly | 54:25

A documentary about communal land and life in Vanuatu, in the South Pacific.

Outriggercanoe_small A Piece of Paradise is a documentary about Vanuatu, a group of tropical islands in the South Pacific. On paper, it?s one of the poorest countries on earth - yet there is very little poverty. No one can own land there, but few are homeless. Sean Kelly traveled to Vanuatu to find out why. It's a place that doesn't fit the Third World stereotype. It may be poor, but you don't see people living in the streets and no one is hungry, says Kelly. While there, he hiked through jungles to visit small communal villages, met with tribal chiefs, witnessed unique rituals, and drank kava - a psychoactive brew prepared by young men who chew and spit out the bitter root. The documentary won a 2007 Gabriel Award.

The Tribal Beat 3/11/07

From KSUT | 29:01

Weekly Native News magazine celebrating current happenings in Indian Country. This edition tells of a new radio program called "Indigenous Politics", broadcasting from Connecticut. Also, news of two Native comedies being staged at Native Voices at the Autry this summer: Berlin Blues by Drew Hayden Taylor and Super Indian by Arigon Starr.

Kauanui_small Every week the Tribal Beat brings news from around Indian Country about things that affect the lives of Native Americans. We also have Notes from Indian Country, a Ute word for the week and the Hoopla, an entertainment and events calendar.