%s1 / %s2

We're working on a new version of PRX. Want a sneak peek?

Playlist: 'Identity'

Compiled By: StoryCorps

MJ Seide talks to her granddaughter Genna Alperin about falling in love with her partner, Genna's biological grandmother. <a href="http://www.prx.org/pieces/44986-storycorps-mj-seide-and-genna-alperin">Listen Here</a>. Credit:
MJ Seide talks to her granddaughter Genna Alperin about falling in love with her partner, Genna's biological grandmother. Listen Here.

How do you identify? Stories dealing with the complicated reality that is identity.

StoryCorps NTI: John Byrne and Samantha Liebman

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 01:50

Teacher John Byrne talks with his former student, Samantha Liebman, about coming out to his students.

Byrne_small Early in his teaching career, John Byrne was very strict, because he feared his students would find out he was gay.

Here, Byrne tells one of his former students, Samantha Liebman, how he eventually came out to his 10th-grade class.

StoryCorps: Bob and Aimee Gerold

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 01:50

Aimee Gerold speaks with her father, Bob, about her adoption from China.

Gerold_small After finding out that they could not conceive children, Bob Gerold and his wife Alice decided to adopt a child from China. They were matched with a baby girl named Aimee.

Here, Aimee talks to her father, Bob, about her adoption.

StoryCorps: Sarah and Joshua Littman

From StoryCorps | 02:43

Sarah Littman interviews her son, Joshua, who has Asperger's syndrome, about his first semester at college.

Littman2_small Sarah Littman interviews her son, Joshua, who has Asperger's syndrome, about his first semester at college.

StoryCorps: Nathan Hoskins and Sally Evans

From StoryCorps | 02:37

Nathan Hoskins tells his friend Sally Evans how his family first learned that he was gay.

Hoskins_small

Nathan Hoskins knew from an early age that he was gay. But he quickly learned to keep that a secret. Nathan grew up in rural Kentucky, in a family that didn’t tolerate homosexuality. At StoryCorps, he told his friend Sally Evans just how dangerous it was to be himself.

StoryCorps: Jennifer and Grant Coursey

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 02:30

Jennifer Coursey speaks with her 12-year-old son, Grant, who was diagnosed with cancer as a toddler.

Coursey_small

As a toddler, Grant Coursey was diagnosed with neuroblastoma — a cancer often found in young children.

A tumor was wrapped around his spinal cord and pushing against his lungs.

It took three surgeries — including one that lasted 10 hours — but in March of 2002 doctors declared Grant cancer-free.

At StoryCorps, Grant interviewed his mother, Jennifer, about that time.

StoryCorps: René and Michelle Foreman

From StoryCorps | 02:15

René Foreman, who survived cancer of the esophagus, tells her daughter Michelle about speaking through an electrolarynx.

Foreman_small In 1999, René Foreman was diagnosed with esophageal cancer. She underwent surgery that saved her life but also took her voice.

Today, René speaks using an electrolarynx–a small device that produces an electronic voice when she holds it against her throat.

René sat down for an interview with her daughter Michelle.

StoryCorps: Winslow and Dorothy Jackson

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 02:07

Winslow Jackson and his wife, Dorothy, who both are living with multiple sclerosis, remember how they met.

Jacksonw_small

Winslow Jackson met his wife, Dorothy, in 2006.

He was divorced. She was widowed. And they both had Multiple Sclerosis.

While receiving rehabilitative care at an Atlanta hospital, they connected.

And at StoryCorps, the couple remembered what drew them to each other.

StoryCorps: Lisa Combest and James Hanson-Brown

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 02:25

Lisa Combest and her ex-husband, James Hanson-Brown, talk about how their marriage ended.

Hanson-brown_small It’s not often that couples split up and stay close friends.

But that’s what happened to James Hanson-Brown and his ex-wife, Lisa Combest.

They fell in love in high school, got married, and began to grow apart.

At StoryCorps, they remembered how their divorce deepened their relationship.

StoryCorps: Theresa and Dennis McLaughlin

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 02:16

Theresa McLaughlin speaks about raising her son, Dennis, who was born with spina bifida, leaving him unable to use his legs.

Mclaughlin_small

Dennis McLaughlin was born in 1948 with spina bifida, a birth defect that left him unable to use his legs.

But his mother, Theresa McLaughlin — a single mom who worked at a local paper mill– knew that “from the neck up, he’s just fine.” So she treated Dennis just like any other kid.

At a StoryCorps mobile booth, Dennis payed tribute to the way Theresa raised him.

StoryCorps: Samuel Taylor & Connie Casey

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 02:33

Samuel Taylor tells his mom, Connie Casey, about being in "ex-gay" conversion therapy as a teenager.

Taylors_small

When he was 15, Samuel Taylor came out to his mother, Connie Casey.

In an attempt to “fix” her son, Connie sent Samuel to a series of conversion therapy ministries affiliated with Exodus International -- The “ex-gay” Christian organization that folded in June 2013 and apologized for promoting reparative therapies.

Now, 22, Samuel came to StoryCorps with his mom to talk about that experience.

StoryCorps: Cheri Lindsay and Phillip Lindsay

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 02:22

Cheri Lindsay talks with her father, Phillip, about vitiligo, a rare skin condition they share...

Lindsay_small

Cheri Lindsay and her father, Phillip, both have vitiligo, a rare skin condition that runs in their family.

People with vitiligo gradually lose pigment in their skin, often in patches that appear randomly and can grow over time.

Cheri’s condition has spread so dramatically over the past four years that most of her face and body now appear white.

At StoryCorps, Cheri remembered when her vitiligo first started to spread.

StoryCorps: Patrick Haggerty and Robin Bolland

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 02:49

70-year-old Patrick Haggerty tells his daughter, Robin, about the day he first had a conversation with his father about being gay.

Haggerty_2_small

Patrick Haggerty grew up the son of a dairy farmer in rural Washington during the 1950s.

As a teenager, Patrick began to understand he was gay–something he thought he was hiding well.

But as he told his daughter Robin, one day, when he went to perform at a school assembly, his father Charles Edward Haggerty, decided to have a serious talk with him.

StoryCorps: Dekalb Walcott Jr. and Dekalb Walcott III

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 02:04

Dekalb Walcott III talks to his dad, retired Chicago Fire Chief Dekalb Walcott Jr., about...

Walcott_small

Dekalb Walcott Jr. spent more than 30 years as a firefighter for the Chicago Fire Department.

He’s now retired--but his son, Dekalb Walcott III, is following in his dad’s line of work.

They recently sat down for a conversation at StoryCorps.

StoryCorps: Patty Woods

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 02:25

Patty Woods remembers her partner, who left a lasting impact on her life.

Woods_small

In the late 1970s, Patty Woods was a waitress at a restaurant in New York City when a customer caught her eye. They became friends and soon after, struck up a relationship.

Years later, Patty lives in San Francisco. At StoryCorps, Patty told Cedar Lay about the lasting impact this partner left on her.

StoryCorps: Barbara Moore and Olivia Fite

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 02:14

Barbara Moore (R) tells her daughter, Olivia Fite (L), about becoming a bricklayer in the...

Moore_small

Barbara Moore spent more than 40 years working as a bricklayer in Baltimore.

She helped lay the foundation for some of the city’s most famous landmarks, including Camden Yards, where the Baltimore Orioles play.

When she started, she was only 21 years old and was the first woman to join her local bricklayers union.

Barbara (R) retired last year and at StoryCorps, she told her daughter, Olivia Fite (L) how she first got into the trade.

StoryCorps: Alex Landau and Patsy Hathaway

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 03:34

Alex Landau, who is African American, and his adoptive mother, Patsy Hathaway, who is white,...

Landaunpr_small

In 2009, Alex Landau was a student at Community College of Denver. After a traffic stop one night, he was severely beaten by Denver Police officers.

Alex is African-American. He was adopted by a white couple and he grew up in largely white, middle-class suburbs of Denver.

Alex and his mother, Patsy Hathaway, came to StoryCorps to talk about how Alex’s race has influenced his life and what happened that night when police pulled him over.

WARNING–this story contains graphic imagery and language.

In 2011, Alex was awarded a $795,000 settlement by the City of Denver.

Two of the officers involved have since been fired from the Denver Police for other incidents. 

StoryCorps: Darnell Moore and Bryan Epps

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 03:43

Darnell Moore (R) tells his friend Bryan Epps (L) about an incident that shaped his...

Moore_small

When Darnell Moore (R) was a teenager in Camden, New Jersey, he didn’t know he was gay, but he did know he was an outcast.

It was the late 1980s and Darnell was a mild-mannered A-student in a city where kids were expected to be tough.

He told his longtime friend Brian Epps (L) about growing up in his neighborhood–and about an incident that shaped his youth.

StoryCorps: Kiyan Williams and Darnell Moore

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 02:45

Kiyan Williams (R) talks with friend Darnell Moore (L) about growing up queer in Newark,...

Williamsk_small

Editor’s Note: This story comes from our Outloud Initiative, collecting stories of the LGBTQ community. Kiyan Williams is gender nonconforming and uses the preferred pronoun “they,” which is gender neutral, rather than “he” or “she.” StoryCorps will use plural pronouns to refer to Kiyan in this post. If you would like to learn more the GENDER book or the Sylvia Rivera Law Project fact sheet are useful resources.

Kiyan Williams (R) grew up in a rough neighborhood in Newark, New Jersey during the 1990s. They excelled in school and eventually left to attend Stanford.

Throughout it all, Kiyan felt isolated and knew from an early age that they weren’t like other kids.

At StoryCorps, Kiyan told their friend Darnell Moore about a time when they were 4 years old, and their family began to notice just how different Kiyan was.

Today, Kiyan works with LGBTQ youth in New York City. 

StoryCorps: Monica Harwell and Andrea Cleveland

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 01:59

Monica Harwell, talks to her daughter, Andrea Cleveland, about being the first woman to climb electric utility poles for ConEd in New York.

Harwellnpr_small

In 1991, Monica Harwell became the first woman to climb electric utility poles for ConEdison in New York.

As a line constructor, her job was to install power lines dozens of feet in the air.

She worked alongside men whose families had been working on the lines for generations.

At StoryCorps, she tells her daughter, Andrea Cleveland -- who now also works for ConEdison -- that many of them never thought she’d make it.

StoryCorps OutLoud: Angela Stowe and Glenda Elliott

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 02:56

Glenda Elliott, 75, tells her friend Angela Stowe about the love of her life, and what it was like to love another woman long before the gay rights movement.

Gelliottnpr_small

Glenda Elliott grew up in Mayfield, Georgia during the 1940s. Long before the Stonewall Riots launched the modern gay right movement she met the love of her life — another woman, named Lauree.

When Glenda sat down with her friend, Angela Stowe, she told the story of this life-long love that never had the chance to blossom.

StoryCorps OutLoud: Jeff Dupre and David Phillips

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 02:38

Jeff Dupre remembers his friend Air Force Tech. Sgt. Leonard Matlovich who appeared on a 1975 cover of Time with the headline, “I Am a Homosexual.”

Duprenpr_small

In September 1975, Air Force Tech. Sgt. Leonard Matlovich was featured on the cover of Time magazine under the headline, “I Am a Homosexual.” It was the first time an openly gay man appeared on the cover of a national news magazine.

In March of that year, Matlovich—who served three tours in Vietnam and received both a Bronze Star and a Purple Heart—delivered a letter to his commanding officer stating that he was gay and that he intended to continue his military career (click here to view a copy of the letter).

Leonard Matlovitch was challenging the military ban on gay service members.

Soon after the issue of Time hit newsstands, Matlovich was discharged from the Air Force for his admission. For the next five years, the decorated veteran fought his dismissal in Federal court and was eventually reinstated. While he never returned to active duty, he did receive a monetary settlement from the military that included back pay.

Tech. Sgt. Leonard Matlovich died on June 22, 1988.

Jeff Dupre knew Leonard Matlovich in the 1970s. He came to StoryCorps with his husband, David Phillips, to record Jeff’s memories of the man who started the legal battle for military acceptance of LGBTQ people.

StoryCorps OutLoud: Claudia Anton and Diana Keough

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 02:24

Sisters from Wisconsin recount what it was like to find out both of their parents had AIDS, and to lose them both to the disease in the early 1990s.

Antonnpr_small

Roger and Christine Bessey had been married for 27 years and were the parents of six children when he learned he had AIDS. According to his family, Roger had been living a double life for decades.

Christine was then diagnosed with AIDS and soon after left her husband.

Roger died in 1990 and Christine died in 1994.

Two of their daughters, Claudia Anton and Diana Keough, came to StoryCorps to remember what it was like to lose both parents to AIDS.

StoryCorps OutLoud: Zeek Taylor and Dick Titus

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 02:35

Together since 1971, Dick Titus and Zeek Taylor came to StoryCorps to discuss the lengths they went to while keeping their relationship secret.

Titusnpr_small

Dick Titus and Zeek Taylor met in Memphis, Tennessee, in 1971. Zeek was openly gay having already come out to his friends and family, but Dick was still in the closet with the added burden of having his family living close by.
 
In order for the two of them to be together, they decided to leave Memphis and move to Fayetteville, Arkansas, a city that would put some distance between Dick and his family, and where he knew he could find work as an electrician. But when they got there, Dick was convinced that he would have to continue to remain closeted after encountering homophobia on job sites, leading him to believe that he would lose work if anyone discovered that he was gay.
 
In order to protect Dick (pictured on the right), they decided to buy two homes—one to live in together and another to use as a dummy house for Dick in case any of his fellow workers wanted to come by at the end of the day. They also established a code in case they ran into any of the people Dick worked with while they were out together. Dick’s colleagues called him “Oscar,” so when they were in public and heard someone use the name, Zeek (pictured on the left) would pretend that they did not know each other.
 
Today, Dick is out to his friends and family. They came to StoryCorps to recall their journey from owners of multiple homes for 13 years, to married owners of a single home together in Eureka Springs, Arkansas.

StoryCorps: Susan Kaphammer and Joshua Myers

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 02:58

Joshua Myers and his mother, Susan Kaphammer, discuss his life living with Down syndrome, and how he has overcome some early difficulties.

Myersnpr_small

Joshua Myers, 29, was born with Down syndrome. Growing up, he often felt overwhelmed by his condition and struggled with depression.
 
Once, when he was a teenager, Joshua attempted suicide by walking into the middle of a busy intersection, but was saved by a passing motorist.
 
For his mother, Susan Kaphammer, it was difficult to watch her son suffer and know that there was very little that she could do to make his pain go away.
 
With those tough times behind them, Joshua and Susan came to StoryCorps to discuss what he now loves about his life, and his dreams for the future.

StoryCorps OutLoud: Carole Smiley with Seth and Octavius Smiley-Humphries

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 03:23

Seth Smiley and Octavius Humphries had their first date on Christmas Eve. They discuss that and other memorable holiday events they have shared.

Smiley-humphriesnpr_small

Hoping to meet someone special, in 2010 Seth Smiley decided to give online dating a try. Soon after posting his profile, Octavius Humphries reached out to him and they began an email correspondence.

Despite their age difference—Seth is 19 years older than Octavius—they immediately hit it off, bonding over their shared search for “commitment, consistency, and (a) connection.”

Eventually they met in person, going on their first date on Christmas Eve. Unsure of Octavius’ plans for the holiday, Seth invited him to dinner the next night at his family’s Atlanta home. Octavius, who was still grieving the deaths of his parents, had, unbeknownst to Seth, planned on spending the holiday alone. Instead, he reluctantly accepted Seth’s invitation.

At StoryCorps, Octavius (above left) and Seth (above right), along with Seth’s mother, Carole Smiley, sat down to remember their first Christmas together, as well as a more recent memorable holiday event.

StoryCorps: Clarence “Clancy” Haskett and Jerry Collier

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 02:09

Clarence ”Clancy” Haskett talks with his friend and former coworker about his long and successful career as a beer vendor for the Baltimore Orioles.

Haskettnpr5_small

This past weekend marked the official opening of the 2016 Major League Baseball season. And while the games now count in the standings, it won’t be until the weather warms up that the competition on the field will really heat up. But in the stands, there is a battle taking place that won’t wait until summer: the fight to be top vendor.
 
As anyone who has ever been to a baseball game knows, vendors roam the stands offering anything from hot dogs and peanuts, to scorecards and foam fingers. They are in a head-to-head competition with each other to sell the most of whatever product they are assigned, and one of the all-time greats is a man known as “Fancy Clancy.”
 
As a teenager, Clarence Haskett began selling soda at Baltimore Orioles games back when they played their home games at Memorial Stadium (the team moved to their current home, Camden Yards, in 1992). Over the years, he worked his way up to the vendor’s most prized offering—beer.
 
During his 43-year long career, Clancy has used his quickness and his gift of gab to sell more than a million beers to baseball fans—a number we believe makes him Hall of Fame worthy.
 
Clancy came to StoryCorps with his friend and former coworker, Jerry Collier, to talk about their work and how he got started.
Clancy’s story is one of 53 work stories featured in our new book, Callings: The Purpose and Passion of Work.
 
Click here to pre-order Callings before April 19, 2016, and get great gifts from StoryCorps.

StoryCorps: Chris López and Gabe López

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 02:25

Gabe López, assigned female at birth, always felt like he was a boy. He came to StoryCorps with his mom to talk about growing up transgender.

Lopezg_npr_small

Chris López always knew there was something different about her youngest child Gabe. Assigned female at birth, Gabe always felt like he was a boy.

Gabe was always more comfortable in clothes traditionally worn by little boys (cargo pants and superhero shirts), but often switched back and forth between those and outfits often worn by little girls. Just after his seventh birthday, he convinced his parents to let him cut off his long hair and get a Mohawk—a haircut he had been wanting for years. This is also about the time that Gabe started dressing only as a boy and answering exclusively to “he” and not “she.”

At first, Chris was concerned that Gabe, being so young, might change his mind. She was scared of how people would treat him as he transitioned. But after seeing how Gabe responded to the changes in his hair and clothing, she felt confident that he had made the right decision.

Last summer, their family attended a camp for transgender, gender creative, and gender non-conforming youth in Tucson, Arizona. There, Gabe met similar kids and made three new best friends—Luke, Cooper, and Brock (who among other things taught Gabe how to pee standing up).

Gabe, who will soon be nine years old, has been attending the same school since kindergarten, and this past August when he started third grade, for the first time, he began having others refer to him by his preferred gender pronouns—”he” and “him.”

Gabe and his mother (pictured in the player above) recently came to the StoryCorps MobileBooth to talk about what it’s been like for him to be transgender, and his fears about the future.

StoryCorps Griot: Alice Mitchell and Ibukun Owolabi

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 02:45

Alice Mitchell and her 10-year-old brother, Ibukun, came to StoryCorps to talk for the first time about their mother who died just weeks after his birth.

Owolabinpr_small Growing up, Alice Mitchell was always very close with her mother Rosemary Owolabi. A Nigerian immigrant as proud of her heritage as she was of her children, Rosemary would pick Alice up from school dressed in vibrantly colored garments and head-wraps.

When Alice was 14, her mother died unexpectedly from cardiac arrest just two weeks after giving birth to her youngest child, a boy she named Ibukunoluwa, which translates to “Blessing from God.”

Alice was immediately forced to become both sister and mother to her new brother, who they call Ibukun, and took the lead in raising him the way she believed her mother would have wanted him brought up.

Now 10 years old, Ibukun lives in Atlanta, Georgia, with his father and stepmother. Over the years he has seen pictures and heard stories about his mother, but came to StoryCorps with Alice to talk for the first time about losing their mother.

Originally aired July 1, 2016 on NPR’s Morning Edition.

StoryCorps: Tariq Sheikh and Tabinda Sheikh

From StoryCorps | 02:23

Married for 25 years, Tabinda and Tariq were recent immigrants when they first met, and even without a common language, their love blossomed.

Sheikhnpr_small

In 1989, Tabinda was working in a Manhattan hotel as a housekeeper. She had just immigrated to the United States from the Dominican Republic and one day at work, she caught the eye of a fellow employee who was working behind the hotel’s front desk--Tariq Sheikh.

Tariq was also a recent immigrant, but from Pakistan, and he remembers that the first time he saw her, Tabinda was hard at work. She was still in her yellow gloves and neither spoke English too well, but after a few clumsy love notes, a relationship was born.

Tariq and Tabinda have now been married for 25 years and have a 20-year-old son, Madani Sheikh. They live in Jersey City, New Jersey, not far from the park bench they were sharing the first time Tariq realized he had fallen in love with Tabinda.

They came to StoryCorps to share the story of how they met.

Originally aired October 21, 2016, on NPR’s Morning Edition.

StoryCorps: John Marboe and Charlie Marboe

From StoryCorps | Part of the StoryCorps series | 02:35

John Marboe, aka Reverend Doctor Garbage Man, tells his 13-year-old daughter, Charlie, about his work as a pastor and a trash hauler.

Marboenpr_small John Marboe, aka Reverend Doctor Garbage Man, tells his 13-year-old daughter, Charlie, about his work as a pastor and a trash hauler.

StoryCorps: Gary Koivu and Kim Koivu

From StoryCorps | 02:06

Vincent Chin was a 27-year-old draftsman living near Detroit. On a June night in 1982, he and a group of friends went out to celebrate his wedding, which was just few days away.

At a bar he crossed paths with Ronald Ebens and Michael Nitz, two auto workers angry about recent layoffs which were widely blamed on Japanese imports. That encounter lead to Vincent’s death.

Gary Koivu was with Vincent that night, and he recently came to StoryCorps with his wife, Kim, to remember his childhood friend.

The federal case against Vincent Chin’s killers, Ronald Ebens and Michael Nitz, marked the first time the Civil Rights Act was used to prosecute a crime against an Asian American person. It sparked a rallying cry for stronger federal hate crime legislation.

Koivusquare-2_small Vincent Chin was a 27-year-old draftsman living near Detroit. On a June night in 1982, he and a group of friends went out to celebrate his wedding, which was just few days away. At a bar he crossed paths with Ronald Ebens and Michael Nitz, two auto workers angry about recent layoffs which were widely blamed on Japanese imports. That encounter lead to Vincent’s death. Gary Koivu was with Vincent that night, and he recently came to StoryCorps with his wife, Kim, to remember his childhood friend. The federal case against Vincent Chin’s killers, Ronald Ebens and Michael Nitz, marked the first time the Civil Rights Act was used to prosecute a crime against an Asian American person. It sparked a rallying cry for stronger federal hate crime legislation.

StoryCorps: Dawn Sahr and Asma Jama

From StoryCorps | 03:24

One night, in October 2015, Asma Jama went out for dinner with her family at an Applebee’s restaurant in Coon Rapids, Minnesota. Asma, who is Somali American and Muslim, was wearing a hijab, as she always does.

While Asma was talking with her cousin in Swahili, a woman named Jodie Bruchard-Risch, who was seated nearby, told her to speak English or go back to her country. When Asma responded to say that she was a U.S. citizen, the woman smashed a beer mug across Asma’s face. She was rushed to the hospital and required 17 stitches in her face, hands and chest.

Bruchard-Risch pleaded guilty to felony assault charges and served time in jail for the crime. After the trial, her sister, Dawn Sahr, contacted Asma online and they struck up a correspondence.

At StoryCorps, Dawn and Asma met in person for the first time.

Jama2_small One night, in October 2015, Asma Jama went out for dinner with her family at an Applebee’s restaurant in Coon Rapids, Minnesota. Asma, who is Somali American and Muslim, was wearing a hijab, as she always does. While Asma was talking with her cousin in Swahili, a woman named Jodie Bruchard-Risch, who was seated nearby, told her to speak English or go back to her country. When Asma responded to say that she was a U.S. citizen, the woman smashed a beer mug across Asma’s face. She was rushed to the hospital and required 17 stitches in her face, hands and chest. Bruchard-Risch pleaded guilty to felony assault charges and served time in jail for the crime. After the trial, her sister, Dawn Sahr, contacted Asma online and they struck up a correspondence. At StoryCorps, Dawn and Asma met in person for the first time.

StoryCorps: Wally Funk and Mary Holsenbeck

From StoryCorps | 02:32

When Wally Funk was 8 years old, she jumped off the roof of her barn while wearing a Superman cape, hoping to fly. That desire never left her, and as an adult she became a pilot and flight instructor. But for Wally, the ultimate destination was always outer space.

She almost got the chance to go in 1961. That year, she was part of a group of female pilots who took part in tests to determine if women were fit for space travel. The project was run by the same doctor who developed tests for NASA astronauts.

The women, who became known as the Mercury 13, passed many of the same tests as the men, but never got to go to space. More than half a century later, Wally Funk hasn’t given up.

She was interviewed in Dallas by one of her flight students, Mary Holsenbeck.

Wally bought a ticket for Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic and hopes to be onboard its maiden voyage into space.

Funksquare-1_small When Wally Funk was 8 years old, she jumped off the roof of her barn while wearing a Superman cape, hoping to fly. That desire never left her, and as an adult she became a pilot and flight instructor. But for Wally, the ultimate destination was always outer space. She almost got the chance to go in 1961. That year, she was part of a group of female pilots who took part in tests to determine if women were fit for space travel. The project was run by the same doctor who developed tests for NASA astronauts. The women, who became known as the Mercury 13, passed many of the same tests as the men, but never got to go to space. More than half a century later, Wally Funk hasn’t given up. She was interviewed in Dallas by one of her flight students, Mary Holsenbeck. Wally bought a ticket for Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic and hopes to be onboard its maiden voyage into space.