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The Peabody Sisters: an interview with biographer Megan Marshall on ThoughtCast

From: Jenny Attiyeh
Length: 35:58

An interview with Megan Marshall, the biographer of The Peabody Sisters -- three women who helped found the Transcendentalist movement in the mid-19th century.

Elizabethpeabody_small Author Megan Marshall has recently written a well-received biography of the three Peabody sisters - Elizabeth, Mary and Sophia - who were key players in the founding of the Transcendentalist movement in the early to mid- 19th century. Elizabeth, the oldest, was intellectually precocious, learning Hebrew as a child so she could read the Old Testament. Mary was the middle sister, somewhat subdued by the dominant - and bossy - qualities of Elizabeth, and by the attention paid to the youngest, Sophia, who was practically an invalid. Nonetheless, Mary managed to become a teacher, writer and reformer. Sophia, beset by devastating migraines, spent most of her early years in bed. But when she had the strength, she painted. Then she caught the eye of Nathaniel Hawthorne... In an interview with ThoughtCast, Megan Marshall continues the tale.

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Author Megan Marshall has recently written a well-received biography of the three Peabody sisters - Elizabeth, Mary and Sophia - who were key players in the founding of the Transcendentalist movement in the early to mid- 19th century. Elizabeth, the oldest, was intellectually precocious, learning Hebrew as a child so she could read the Old Testament. Mary was the middle sister, somewhat subdued by the dominant - and bossy - qualities of Elizabeth, and by the attention paid to the youngest, Sophia, who was practically an invalid. Nonetheless, Mary managed to become a teacher, writer and reformer. Sophia, beset by devastating migraines, spent most of her early years in bed. But when she had the strength, she painted. Then she caught the eye of Nathaniel Hawthorne... In an interview with ThoughtCast, Megan Marshall continues the tale.

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Review of The Peabody Sisters: an interview with biographer Megan Marshall on ThoughtCast

In the early years of radio, when society was arguing over the new psychic real estate that the airwaves were offering, it was deemed that radio should "inform, enlighten, and entertain" (and "educate" in Britain). This credo has nearly been lost, but we have a new chance with podcasts. "Thoughtcast" is one I subscribe to. For us perennial students (I think we are many), what a pleasure to get the gist of a fascinating academic's book and subject, and have Jenny Attiyeh stand in for us to ask well-prepared and thought-provoking questions? "The Peabody Sisters" sheds light on a time and a history that I wish I knew more about.

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http://www.thoughtcast.org