We're working on a new version of PRX. Want a sneak peek?

Caption: A woman in Almolonga, Guatemala, selling carrots and potatos wholesale., Credit: Jesse Dukes
Image by: Jesse Dukes 
A woman in Almolonga, Guatemala, selling carrots and potatos wholesale. 

The Soul of Guatemala Part I Miracle Town

From: Jesse Dukes
Series: The Soul of Guatemala
Length: 05:56

Embed_button
Part I in a series of three short features about Latin America's Evangelical Frontier.

1-guatesoul-8718_small For centuries, Latin America has been overwhelmingly Catholic. But that is changing—Evangelical Protestantism is growing throughout  Latin America. And, now Guatemala—the small, mountainous country just south of Mexico—has the highest percentage of Evangelical Christians of any Latin American Country. Some experts think Guatemala will soon be majority Protestant.

Part I | Miracle Town , tells the story of a town that converted en masse to Evangelical Christianity. Shortly after, the town experienced renewed agricultural prosperity. Evangelicals claim it's a miracle, but others disagree.



This documentary is available as a full 27 minute piece , or split un into 10 minute and 17 minute sections to fit Segments A + B in NPR's Special Programming clock. Versions with and without ambi beds available.. See series page for details.
Support provided by The Open Society Foundations
and
The International Reporting Project

Piece Description

For centuries, Latin America has been overwhelmingly Catholic. But that is changing—Evangelical Protestantism is growing throughout  Latin America. And, now Guatemala—the small, mountainous country just south of Mexico—has the highest percentage of Evangelical Christians of any Latin American Country. Some experts think Guatemala will soon be majority Protestant.

Part I | Miracle Town , tells the story of a town that converted en masse to Evangelical Christianity. Shortly after, the town experienced renewed agricultural prosperity. Evangelicals claim it's a miracle, but others disagree.



This documentary is available as a full 27 minute piece , or split un into 10 minute and 17 minute sections to fit Segments A + B in NPR's Special Programming clock. Versions with and without ambi beds available.. See series page for details.
Support provided by The Open Society Foundations
and
The International Reporting Project

Transcript

The Soul of Guatemala | Part 1| Miracle Town
PART 1: The Miracle Town
Host: For centuries, Latin America has been overwhelmingly Catholic. But that is changing—Evangelical Protestantism is growing throughout Latin America. And, now Guatemala—the small, mountainous country just south of Mexico—has the highest percentage of Evangelical Christians of any Latin American Country. Jesse Dukes reports from Almolonga(al-moe-LONE-gah) , an indigenous Mayan town in the highlands of Guatemala. Famous for high quality vegetables, and for converting overwhelmingly to Evangelical Christianity in the 1970s.

Jesse: Almolonga looks like something out of a Steinbeck novel. A narrow valley, lined by mountains with steep vegetable fields rising almost to the ridges. In the market, there are carrots the size of a man’s forearm and stacks of softball sized onions.…. [MORE CAR SOUNDS HERE}The vegetables are...
Read the full transcript

Timing and Cues

Part I | Miracle Town

IN :02 ambi bed “Almolonga looks like something out of a Steinbeck Novel”

OUT: “I’m Jesse Dukes” -:03

Intro and Outro

INTRO:

Part I | Miracle Town

Host: For centuries, Latin America has been overwhelmingly Catholic. But that is changing—Evangelical Protestantism is growing throughout Latin America. And, now Guatemala—the small, mountainous country just south of Mexico—has the highest percentage of Evangelical Christians of any Latin American Country. Jesse Dukes reports from Almolonga(al-moe-LONE-gah) , an indigenous Mayan town in the highlands of Guatemala. Famous for high quality vegetables, and for converting overwhelmingly to Evangelical Christianity in the 1970s.

OUTRO:

Additional Credits

Produced by Jesse Dukes for Big Shed Media
Edited by John Biewen

Financial Support from the Open Society Foundations
and
TheThe International Reporting Project

This story is part of the Global Story Project from PRX, the Public Radio Exchange.

Additional reporting by Sarah Reynolds, and Nic Wirtz,

Production assistance by Dennis Conrow and Christina Gonzalez