Piece image

Sexual Cyberbullying: The Modern Day Letter A

From: Radio Rookies
Series: Radio Rookies: McBurney YMCA 2012
Length: 08:24

Embed_button
These days, many teenagers live half their lives on social media sites, and they're writing the rules as they go. One online trend 16-year-old Radio Rookie Temitayo Fagbenle finds disturbing is something she calls "slut-shaming," or using photos and videos to turn a girl's private life inside out. Read the full description.

Dsc_1727_small These days, many teenagers live half their lives on social media sites, and they're writing the rules as they go. One online trend 16-year-old Radio Rookie Temitayo Fagbenle finds disturbing is something she calls "slut-shaming," or using photos and videos to turn a girl's private life inside out.

More from Radio Rookies

Piece image

American Dream - Minus My Mom (06:35)
From: Radio Rookies

Rebelling against your parents is the norm for most teens in America, but for some young people who immigrate to the U.S. without one or both of their parents- a luxury. ...
Piece image

My Education, Uninterrupted (06:18)
From: Radio Rookies

New York State has the worst high school graduation rate in the country, according to a recent study by the Schott Foundation for Public Education. The rates are even worse ...
Piece image

American Heaven (07:27)
From: Radio Rookies

18-year-old Radio Rookie Reporter, Danielle came from the Congo when she was 13 years old, leaving her mother and the life that she knew behind in hopes of a better future. ...
Piece image

Sickle and Me (07:11)
From: Radio Rookies

Nearly 100,000 Americans suffer from a blood disorder called Sickle Cell Anemia, a painful disease that shortens life-expectancy. Sickle cells aren’t round – they’re shaped ...
Piece image

The Mary Jane Mindset: Teenagers and Marijuana (08:17)
From: Radio Rookies

Radio Rookies Temitayo Fagbenle and Gemma Weiner spent the past several months talking to dozens of teenagers who smoke weed about where they buy it, how much they spend on ...
Piece image

Breast-Fed Language (08:02)
From: Radio Rookies

About two thirds of New Yorkers are from immigrant families. And when parents - who came here from other countries - raise American children, they face all kinds of choices ...
Piece image

Back to the Middle East (07:51)
From: Radio Rookies

Radio Rookie Alexis Gordon's dad has been in the Army Reserves since before she was born. He served a tour in Iraq when she was in the 5th grade and was recently deployed ...
Piece image

Interview With a Teenage Vampire (07:27)
From: Radio Rookies

Just when you think the vampire craze might have run its course, a new book hits the stores or another TV show launches. Next week the latest Twilight movie opens nationwide, ...
Piece image

Who's Going to Protect Me? (07:04)
From: Radio Rookies

Civil rights groups are pushing the NYPD to change its stop and frisk policy and 17-year-old Radio Rookie Edwin Llanos thinks a change might help police gain more people's ...
Piece image

The ABCs of Chinese Americans (07:35)
From: Radio Rookies

Most New Yorkers know that over the past half century, Flushing Queens has transformed from a mostly white suburb to one of the largest Asian populated areas in the United ...

Piece Description

1 Comment Atom Feed

User image

Review of Sexual Cyberbullying: The Modern Day Letter A

The story starts off right, with great voice work and use of sound, mixing today's media hungry landscape with Hester Prynne's literary reality. It's a bold statement to say that online slut-shaming is the new Scarlet Letter, but given the prevalence of these pictures and the response they get from peers -- it's a title that isn't far from the truth.

Fearless with the use of words that many would shy away from - slut, ho, hussy -- the producer gets right to the crux of the issue. There's some great mixing here, not only technically, but in the way the producer mixed her own experience into the story without hesitation. It's obvious she is young, immersed in this world, and only a little ambivalent about what's happening in it -- "maybe I should report it..." The personal side of this story is not too intrusive, and helps listeners relate. Not once did I feel dictated to, instead I felt like I was getting educated. This story lacks statistics and the nuts and bolts of a “reporter piece,” but effectively shines light on many sides of this issue without losing listener interest. The prevalence of social media in spreading information (approved and unapproved), the nature of girl-on-girl abusive gossip, and what little power victims of sexual cyber bullying have over their own online reputation are all addressed. This piece would fit perfectly into any series on technology, privacy, or web-crime.

Seamless scene transitions and conversational tone give authority to her commentary on a very pressing issue. When I first read the title, I immediately thought of the Steubenville rape case, where pictures and videos of a drunk, naked teenage girl spread through text and Twitter. Though an obvious crime, law enforcement is still having trouble pinning down who is guilty of what. The blame game is hard to play, when thousands of potential viewers can access private information at the click of a button, delete their history, or just sit by without reporting. I was glad to see the producer not only focused on the way young women talk about their classmates, but the way that young men, families, schools and social media sites react to the spread of these images. There's a lot of issues that generation "i" will have to deal with, but privacy issues will certainly be near the top of that list, and this story is just a piece of the puzzle -- but a nicely crafted one.

Broadcast History

WNYC "Morning Edition" December 2012

Additional Credits

Courtney Stein, Producer
Marianne McCune, Editor

Related Website

http://www.wnyc.org/shows/rookies/articles/radio-rookies/2012/dec/28/sexual-cyberbullying-modern-day-letter/