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Caption: Margaret and Mohammed discuss how Americans marginalize their religions. , Credit: Jesse Ellis
Image by: Jesse Ellis 
Margaret and Mohammed discuss how Americans marginalize their religions.  

Latitude News Podcast #5 — The Mormon and the Muslim

From: Latitude News
Length: 13:10

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Islam and Mormonism — not exactly a perfect pair? Actually, these two religions have a striking similarity: both are marginalized in American society.

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Latitude News had received some tips that Salt Lake City — global home of the Mormon Church — was also a comfortable home for Iraqis. Islam and Mormonism — perhaps a surprising pairing, but they have at least one thing in common: both are marginalized in American society. Research conducted by the Pew Research Center shows that Americans see Islam and the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints as on the fringe, although in recent years perceptions of Mormons have improved while perceptions of Muslims have worsened. Yet in a global context, both faiths are mainstream. About one-fourth of the world is Muslim and that number is growing faster than any other religious group. Meanwhile, while Latter-day Saints number far fewer than Muslims, the global Mormon population has swelled in recent years, with 60 percent of the world's 14 million Mormons now living outside of the U.S.

Given the vitriolic nature of the election that is, thankfully, behind us; given the fact that Islam and Mormonism have become celebrities in the U.S. for all the wrong reasons — Latitude News asked two Utah residents, an American-born Mormon and an Iraqi-born Muslim, to sit down for a conversation on faith. Margaret Young and Mohammed Mushib are eloquent, funny, sharp and, frankly, a little tired of being seen as different.

Piece Description

Latitude News had received some tips that Salt Lake City — global home of the Mormon Church — was also a comfortable home for Iraqis. Islam and Mormonism — perhaps a surprising pairing, but they have at least one thing in common: both are marginalized in American society. Research conducted by the Pew Research Center shows that Americans see Islam and the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints as on the fringe, although in recent years perceptions of Mormons have improved while perceptions of Muslims have worsened. Yet in a global context, both faiths are mainstream. About one-fourth of the world is Muslim and that number is growing faster than any other religious group. Meanwhile, while Latter-day Saints number far fewer than Muslims, the global Mormon population has swelled in recent years, with 60 percent of the world's 14 million Mormons now living outside of the U.S.

Given the vitriolic nature of the election that is, thankfully, behind us; given the fact that Islam and Mormonism have become celebrities in the U.S. for all the wrong reasons — Latitude News asked two Utah residents, an American-born Mormon and an Iraqi-born Muslim, to sit down for a conversation on faith. Margaret Young and Mohammed Mushib are eloquent, funny, sharp and, frankly, a little tired of being seen as different.

Intro and Outro

INTRO:

For Broadcast version: Our next report comes from Latitude News dot com, which looks at connections between the U.S. and the rest of the world. As Dan Moulthrop reports, this story starts in an unexpected place, or pair of places.

OUTRO:

Musical Works

Title Artist Album Label Year Length
Plink Racket Podington Bear www.soundofpicture.com. self-published 2012 :56
Dolphin Waltz Podington Bear www.soundofpicture.com. self-published 2012 01:35

Related Website

http://www.latitudenews.com/latitudepodcastprx/