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Global Ethics Corner: Can Trust Be Restored?

From: Carnegie Council
Series: Global Ethics Corner
Length: 02:01

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With a U.S.-made anti-Islam film angering many in the Muslim world, some are wondering if there is an unbridgeable divide between the two cultures. Is Islam compatible with free speech and democracy? Can trust between the U.S. and Muslim communities be restored?

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Global Ethics Corner is a weekly 2 minute segment devoted to newsworthy ethical issues. It presents both sides of an issue, asking viewers to weigh the information and make up their own minds.

Piece Description

Global Ethics Corner is a weekly 2 minute segment devoted to newsworthy ethical issues. It presents both sides of an issue, asking viewers to weigh the information and make up their own minds.

Transcript

Shortly after President Obama took office in 2009, he delivered a groundbreaking speech in Cairo, Egypt, where he announced a "new beginning " in relations between the Islamic world and the United States. For a while, public opinion polls showed the U.S. winning high marks among Muslim communities in Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Pakistan, and Turkey. Many expected the trend to continue long into President Obama's presidency.

But the wave of protests prompted by an American's amateur film ridiculing the Prophet Mohammed, have called such hopes into question. After all the expectations ushered in by the Arab Spring, a new wave of analysts are pointing to a so-called "clash of civilizations." They argue that there's an unbridgeable divide between America's defense of free speech, no matter how hateful, and the views of many Muslims across the world, who believe that governments should censor wh...
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Additional Credits

Deborah Carroll – Executive Producer
Marlene Spoerri – Contributing Writer
Julia Kennedy - Content Editor
Robert Smithline - Editor
Terence Hurley - Editor
Gusta Johnson - Production Assistant

Related Website

www.carnegiecouncil.org