Caption: A sculpture of a tumor made by caraballo-farman for Object Breast Cancer , Credit: caraballo-farman
Image by: caraballo-farman 
A sculpture of a tumor made by caraballo-farman for Object Breast Cancer  

Object Breast Cancer

From: Eric Molinsky
Length: 07:12

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A pair of artists came up with a new approach to representing breast cancer that's very different from pink ribbons. They use MRI scans to sculpt bronze pendants and paperweights in the shape of actual tumors. Read the full description.

Main_sculpture_small The pink ribbon has been an incredibly successful piece of marketing for breast cancer research. For cancer survivor Leonor Caraballo, it's supremely annoying. She always hated the color pink. She wanted to come up with a symbol that she didn’t find infantilizing. Caraballo is a new media artist who collaborates with her husband, Abou Farman, under the name caraballo-farman. The couple started making bronze models of real tumors, created from MRI scans, that you can wear around your neck or put on your desk. Independent Producer Eric Molinsky discovered this artwork is also creating buzz among cancer researchers.

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Piece Description

The pink ribbon has been an incredibly successful piece of marketing for breast cancer research. For cancer survivor Leonor Caraballo, it's supremely annoying. She always hated the color pink. She wanted to come up with a symbol that she didn’t find infantilizing. Caraballo is a new media artist who collaborates with her husband, Abou Farman, under the name caraballo-farman. The couple started making bronze models of real tumors, created from MRI scans, that you can wear around your neck or put on your desk. Independent Producer Eric Molinsky discovered this artwork is also creating buzz among cancer researchers.