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Agincourt

From: KVNF
Series: Belief Systems and Other B.S.
Length: 03:33

Recent disputes about various features of this historical battle highlight the difficulty of being certain about any past event Read the full description.
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Agincourt
From
KVNF

Bwheadcopy_small Recent disputes about various features of this historical battle highlight the difficulty of being certain about any past event

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Piece Description

Recent disputes about various features of this historical battle highlight the difficulty of being certain about any past event

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Review of Agincourt

A great piece discussing the influence of individuals on human history. There really is no way of definitevly describing what happened yesterday or a moment ago and thus our history is subject to constant variation. This is made plainly evident through the conversation in this piece, which is well written and generally well produced. I definitely prefer a piece that makes me think.

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Review of Agincourt

Think Ira Glass.

This is an interesting riff on the truthiness of history. Starting with the battle of Agincourt about which historians take disparate views of the facts and then pulling back to ask the larger question of reliability of history in general, Angus leads us to reasses our assumptions about the authority of the written word.

This is an expertly written and endearingly delivered essay. It is multi-layered without being too complex and is entirely entertaining. Angus' articulate style is fun and friendly. He encourages us to think without forcing us to work too hard. Well done!