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Humankind: The Diet-Climate Connection (Hour 1)

From: Humankind
Length: 58:59

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What was the carbon footprint of your dinner last night? This special documentary project examines how the foods we eat affect the planet we inhabit. In a period of extreme weather associated with climate change, our food choices can make a difference. Agriculture is a heavy emitter of heat-trapping gases. And in this sound-rich production, listeners will learn that some foods (fruits and vegetables) often have a much lighter environmental footprint than others (meat and dairy). The health benefits of climate-friendly foods are also covered.

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What was the carbon footprint of your dinner last night? This Humankind documentary project, by award-winning producer David Freudberg, examines how the foods we eat affect the planet we inhabit. In a period of extreme weather associated with climate change -- 2012 was the hottest summer on record -- our food choices can make a difference. Agriculture is a heavy emitter of heat-trapping gases. And in this sound-rich production, listeners will learn that some foods (fruits and vegetables) often have a much lighter environmental footprint than others (meat and dairy). The health benefits of climate-friendly foods are covered. 

In Hour 1,
we visit college campuses and several public high schools striving to offer more “sustainable dining” options as well as healthier food choices. And we explore the concerns of young people, who feel an urgent need to address the threat of global warming, and have made related dietary choices. How large institutions implement these goals is discussed. 

Listeners can access our free downloadable Climate-Friendly Food Guide booklet, which is announced in the program. Produced in association with WGBH/Boston. 

Piece Description

What was the carbon footprint of your dinner last night? This Humankind documentary project, by award-winning producer David Freudberg, examines how the foods we eat affect the planet we inhabit. In a period of extreme weather associated with climate change -- 2012 was the hottest summer on record -- our food choices can make a difference. Agriculture is a heavy emitter of heat-trapping gases. And in this sound-rich production, listeners will learn that some foods (fruits and vegetables) often have a much lighter environmental footprint than others (meat and dairy). The health benefits of climate-friendly foods are covered. 

In Hour 1,
we visit college campuses and several public high schools striving to offer more “sustainable dining” options as well as healthier food choices. And we explore the concerns of young people, who feel an urgent need to address the threat of global warming, and have made related dietary choices. How large institutions implement these goals is discussed. 

Listeners can access our free downloadable Climate-Friendly Food Guide booklet, which is announced in the program. Produced in association with WGBH/Boston. 

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Timing and Cues

Each Humankind episode consists of two 29:00 segments that can be aired as stand-alone programs or as a full-hour broadcast (with midpoint billboard included).

The Incue for each segment is: "Humankind is produced..."
The Outcue for each segment is: "The Executive Producer is David Freudberg. This is Humankind."

***For stations preferring FULL-HOUR programs:
The end of the first segment is followed at 29:00 with a billboard for the second half-hour, concluding with the phrase, "when Humankind continues in a moment." This is followed immediately by a :30 music bed for local ID, etc. The bed begins at 29:30. Second half of the program begins at 30:00 and concludes at 59:00 with: "The Executive Producer is David Freudberg. This is Humankind."

***For stations preferring HALF-HOUR programs:
Stations are entitled to air either or both half-hours. The first half-hour runs 29:00 and concludes with: "The Executive Producer is David Freudberg. This is Humankind." Next is a 1-minute billboard of which the last thirty seconds are a music bed for local ID. This is followed by the second half-hour segment of Humankind, also running 29:00 and concluding with: "The Executive Producer is David Freudberg. This is Humankind."

(Note that if a single topic or documentary is spread over two half-hour episodes, each is still designed to air as a stand-alone half-hour, if desired.)