Caption: Woodcut of the 1886 Haymarket Square Bombing., Credit: Harper's Weekly, LOC.
Image by: Harper's Weekly, LOC. 
Woodcut of the 1886 Haymarket Square Bombing. 

Fear Tactics: A History of Domestic Terrorism [rebroadcast]

From: BackStory with the American History Guys
Series: BackStory with the American History Guys: Full Episodes
Length: 54:00

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With recent events in Boston highlighting the horrors of domestic terrorism, we're re-broadcasting this episode of BackStory, which originally aired last fall.

Terrorism

On September 16, 1920, a bomb exploded on Wall Street as workers took their lunch break. The explosion killed 38 people and injured hundreds. The targets? What we'd call today "the one percent" -- the powerful financiers who ran J.P. Morgan & Co. The Wall Street attack remained the deadliest terrorist bombing in the U.S. until Oklahoma City in 1995. But at the time, people saw it as just one more bombing in a long string of anarchist attacks -- what historian Beverly Gage calls America's "First Age of Terror."

In this hour of BackStory , the History Guys talk with Gage about the origins of domestic terrorism in the United States, and ask what kinds of people have been identified as "terrorists." Along the way, they trace the relationship between terror and the state, consider lynching as a form of terrorism, and take a look at an unfinished Jack London novel, in which the author grapples with that ultimate question: is terrorism ever justified?

Piece Description

On September 16, 1920, a bomb exploded on Wall Street as workers took their lunch break. The explosion killed 38 people and injured hundreds. The targets? What we'd call today "the one percent" -- the powerful financiers who ran J.P. Morgan & Co. The Wall Street attack remained the deadliest terrorist bombing in the U.S. until Oklahoma City in 1995. But at the time, people saw it as just one more bombing in a long string of anarchist attacks -- what historian Beverly Gage calls America's "First Age of Terror."

In this hour of BackStory , the History Guys talk with Gage about the origins of domestic terrorism in the United States, and ask what kinds of people have been identified as "terrorists." Along the way, they trace the relationship between terror and the state, consider lynching as a form of terrorism, and take a look at an unfinished Jack London novel, in which the author grapples with that ultimate question: is terrorism ever justified?

Timing and Cues

SHOW RUNDOWN

06:00 – 19:00 SEG A

IC: Major support for Backstory is provided by the National Endowment for the Humanities.
OC: You’re listening to BackStory. Don’t go away.

6:00 - 19:00 The Day Wall Street Exploded

Brian talks with historian Beverly Gage on America’s “First Age of Terror,” and Gage tells the story of an early anarchist attack on Wall Street.

19:00 – 20:00 STATION BREAK 1 (MUSIC BED)

20:00 – 39:00 SEG B
IC: This is BackStory…
OC: We’ll be back in a minute.

20:00 – 27:39 Statements of Fact?

Can governments be guilty of terrorism? From the French Revolution to John Brown at Harper’s Ferry, the History Guys riff on the historical connections between terror and the state.

27:40 – 39:00 Seen and Believed

Ed talks with historian Amy Wood about how lynching photographs were used first by white supremacists to spread terror, before being appropriated by the African-American community as tools of protest.

39:00 – 40:00 STATION BREAK 2 (MUSIC BED)

40:00 – 59:00 SEG C

IC: We’re back with BackStory…
OC: …at the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities

40:00 – 49:47 Listener Calls
Peter, Ed, and Brian take calls from listeners.

49:48 – 57:20 Blurring the Blurry Lines
Producer Eric Mennel tells the story of how a turn-of-the-century American writer grappled with his own ambivalence about the meanings and purposes of terrorism.

57:20 – 59:00 PRODUCTION/FUNDING CREDITS

Related Website

http://backstoryradio.org/?p=8267