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Image by: Paula Kahumbu 

Maasai lion hunt

From: Paula Kahumbu
Series: AFRICA'S WILDEST STORIES
Length: 04:55

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There was a time when the Maasai in East Africa were few and the wildlife numerous. Moran, or warriors were required to hunt lions to prove their courage. Not all hunts were successful - Mepukori describes what it was like when the hunted turned hunter.

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This is one of Africa's Wildest Stories recorded in the field on the slopes of Mt Kilimanjaro. Mzee Mepukori was attending a wedding and agreed to be interviewed by a young educated Maasai Sammy. The lion hunt described no longer occurs in it's traditional form. The aim of the Africa's Greatest Stories project is to create an online living audio oral history of wildlife related stories told by people who live or have lived in Africa. The project will involve young people interviewing older generations in families, across generations, cultures and races. Many of the stories will be told by a generation of elders who were born before independence into a very different conditions of environment, society, culture and education. Now 50 years after independence, those experiences and the wisdom of the elders is in real danger of being lost. Their real life stories will be recorded and heard via radio and internet exactly the way they were originally told.

The result will be the passing on of knowledge to younger generations who will fall in love with Africa’s spectacular wildlife heritage and to call them into action to delight in the natural environment and to defend it against further losses. This project will also create cultural continuity by storing and sharing stories from the older generations even after they pass. This project will safeguard these memories in the form of audio and visual stories, accounts, narratives and experiences told by those who experienced them and retold to this and future unborn generations exactly the way they were originally told.

This project aims to make the connection between our extraordinary cultural and biological diversity and to recognize it as a vital part of Africa’s heritage. If we fail to record our history from those alive today, we will lose important lessons from the past, we may never value what is left, or even know what we have lost.

If you would like to support or participate in the project email paula@wildlifedirect.org

Piece Description

This is one of Africa's Wildest Stories recorded in the field on the slopes of Mt Kilimanjaro. Mzee Mepukori was attending a wedding and agreed to be interviewed by a young educated Maasai Sammy. The lion hunt described no longer occurs in it's traditional form. The aim of the Africa's Greatest Stories project is to create an online living audio oral history of wildlife related stories told by people who live or have lived in Africa. The project will involve young people interviewing older generations in families, across generations, cultures and races. Many of the stories will be told by a generation of elders who were born before independence into a very different conditions of environment, society, culture and education. Now 50 years after independence, those experiences and the wisdom of the elders is in real danger of being lost. Their real life stories will be recorded and heard via radio and internet exactly the way they were originally told.

The result will be the passing on of knowledge to younger generations who will fall in love with Africa’s spectacular wildlife heritage and to call them into action to delight in the natural environment and to defend it against further losses. This project will also create cultural continuity by storing and sharing stories from the older generations even after they pass. This project will safeguard these memories in the form of audio and visual stories, accounts, narratives and experiences told by those who experienced them and retold to this and future unborn generations exactly the way they were originally told.

This project aims to make the connection between our extraordinary cultural and biological diversity and to recognize it as a vital part of Africa’s heritage. If we fail to record our history from those alive today, we will lose important lessons from the past, we may never value what is left, or even know what we have lost.

If you would like to support or participate in the project email paula@wildlifedirect.org

Related Website

http://wildlifedirect.org