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Image by: Jessica Partnow 

Life After War

From: Seattle Globalist
Series: Refugees in Puget Sound
Length: 07:36

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Refugees coming to the US have just a few months to find a job and a place to live. And they are 10 times as likely as the general population to suffer from post–traumatic stress disorder. In this story, Iraqi refugees talk about recovering from life in a war zone.

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New refugees coming to the United States have just a few months to find a job and a place to live. On top of that, they are 10 times as likely as the general population to suffer from post–traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Beth Farmer: "We've often thought we should give away t–shirts that say 'I survived my first year in America.'"

That's Beth Farmer, who works with refugees suffering from depression and PTSD.

In today's segment of "Refugees in Puget Sound," reporter Jessica Partnow talks to Iraqi refugees about recovering from life in a war zone.

Piece Description

New refugees coming to the United States have just a few months to find a job and a place to live. On top of that, they are 10 times as likely as the general population to suffer from post–traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Beth Farmer: "We've often thought we should give away t–shirts that say 'I survived my first year in America.'"

That's Beth Farmer, who works with refugees suffering from depression and PTSD.

In today's segment of "Refugees in Puget Sound," reporter Jessica Partnow talks to Iraqi refugees about recovering from life in a war zone.

Broadcast History

Aired on KUOW January 2012.

Transcript

TRANSCRIPT

The Kuba family lives in a small ground–floor apartment in Kent. Their few pieces of furniture are all crowded into one corner of the living room, as if pushing everything close together will make it seem like there is more of it. At dinnertime, they have to squeeze in around a tiny coffee table. The walls are bare.

But there's a lot more space here than they had a few weeks ago, when they were living in their car.

Amer Kuba: "I leave my home. And all my stuff in the street cause I don't have money for truck."

This is Amer Kuba. He is a refugee from Iraq. At his first apartment, rent was $735. But he only got $560 in refugee cash assistance. It caught up with him, and he was evicted.

Kuba: "I take just my clothes and I sleep in my car almost three month. I drive in night, and my family sleep in car."

Back in Baghdad, Amer had a small chain of electronics stores.

He says...
Read the full transcript

Intro and Outro

INTRO:

New refugees coming to the United States have just a few months to find a job and a place to live. On top of that, they are 10 times as likely as the general population to suffer from post–traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Beth Farmer: "We've often thought we should give away t–shirts that say 'I survived my first year in America.'"

That's Beth Farmer, who works with refugees suffering from depression and PTSD.

In today's segment of "Refugees in Puget Sound," reporter Jessica Partnow talks to Iraqi refugees about recovering from life in a war zone.

OUTRO:

Jessica Partnow is a cofounder of the Common Language Project. In tomorrow’s segment, she follows a South Sudanese teenager’s struggle to get herself – and her seven younger brothers and sisters – through college. Support for this series on refugees in the Seattle area comes from the Program Venture Fund. Contributors include Paul and Laurie Ahern (uh-HERN) and Puget Sound Energy.

Additional Files

Additional Credits

Jim Gates, Editor
Mustafa Zaki, Interpreter & Assistant Producer

Related Website

http://clpmag.org/article.php?article=Refugees-in-Puget-Sound_00338