Caption: Jelly Roll Morton
Jelly Roll Morton 

Early Jelly Roll

From: Guy Rathbun
Series: the Club McKenzie: Your 1920s Jazz Speakeasy
Length: 58:58

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No one questions the fact that Ferdinand “Jelly Roll” Morton was, in all likelihood, the first arranger of jazz. It’s also true that Jelly Roll was one of the earliest purveyors of ragtime. But, he went even further with his declaration of having “invented jazz, ragtime, swing, and boogie boogie piano.” Read the full description.

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Over the years, Morton has been overlooked primarily because he was such a braggadocio. However, one only has to listen to his earliest recordings to recognize his pioneering spirit.  The problem is, where to hear these scratchy, rare pieces? Most of the reissue material we hear is from his later years with the formation of his Red Hot Peppers. This show is devoted to his early work, with only 3 titles representing his later group.

Also in the the Club McKenzie: Your 1920s Jazz Speakeasy series

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To say that London was not known as a mecca for early jazz is an understatement, however, Britain adopted America’s music very quickly. The Savoy Orpheans were one of the ...
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A native of Panama, Luis Russell moved to New Orleans in 1919 after winning a $3000 lottery. He became a mainstay house pianist. But, in 1925 he moved to Chicago where he ...
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Quality Serenaders (58:59)
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Paul Howard’s Quality Serenaders should be better known. But, they’re not. Part of the reason is their geographical location: Los Angeles - 1929. Although there were several ...
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Coon-Sanders Original Nighthawk Orchestra (58:58)
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The chance meeting of Joe Sanders and Carleton Coon shortly after World War I lead to one of the most successful bands of the 1920s. You could say, without hesitation, they ...
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The Panassie Sessions (58:59)
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French historian and jazz promoter came to America with enthusiasm in 1938 for one purpose: to put together a group of New Orleans musicians for a recording date.
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Louie's Lament (58:57)
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Piece Description

Over the years, Morton has been overlooked primarily because he was such a braggadocio. However, one only has to listen to his earliest recordings to recognize his pioneering spirit.  The problem is, where to hear these scratchy, rare pieces? Most of the reissue material we hear is from his later years with the formation of his Red Hot Peppers. This show is devoted to his early work, with only 3 titles representing his later group.

Broadcast History

KCBX Public Rdio

Timing and Cues

Segment 1 - Incue: Theme ...
Outcue for Segment 1 @ 22:34: "... after this brief break."
62s music bed break
Incue for Segment 2 @ 23:36: music
Outcue for Segment 2 @ 41:22: "... after this break."
62s music bed break
Incue for Segment 3 @ 42:24: music
Outcue for Segment 3 @ 58:59: theme ends.

Musical Works

Title Artist Album Label Year Length
Fish Tail Blues Jelly Roll Morton’s Kings of Jazz 78 RPM 1924 :00
My Gal Jelly Roll Morton’s Jazz Trio LP 1925 :00
Wolverine Blues Jelly Roll Morton w/clarinet solo 78 RPM` 1925 :00
Mr. Jelly Lord Jelly Roll Morton’s Incomparables LP 1926 :00
Soap Suds St. Louis Levee Band 78 RPM 1926 :00
Soap Suds St. Louis Levee Band 78 RPM 1926 :00
Blue Blood Blues Jelly Roll Morton & his Red Hot Peppers Centennial. RCA 1930 :00
Dead Man Blues Edmonia Henderson & Jelly Roll Morton 78 RPM 1926 :00
Jelly Roll Morton & his Red Hot Peppers Pretty Lil Centennial. RCA 1929 :00
Georgia Grind Edmonia Henderson & Jelly Roll Morton 78 RPM 1926 :00
Sweetheart O’ Mine Jelly Roll Morton LP 1926 :00
Fat Meat & Greens Jelly Roll Morton LP 1926 :00
Mournful Serenade Jelly Roll Morton & his Red Hot Peppers Centennial. RCA 1928 :00
Big Fat Ham Jelly Roll Morton & his Orchestra Doctor Jazz. Proper 1926 :00
Mamie’s Blues Jelly Roll Morton & his Orchestra LP 1939 :00
Muddy Water Blues Jelly Roll Morton Doctor Jazz. Proper 1923 :00
Sobbin’ Blues New Orleans Rhythm Kings LP 1923 :00