Piece image

RN Documentary: The First Newcomers

From: Radio Netherlands Worldwide
Series: RN Documentaries
Length: 29:30

Immigration to the Dutch Republic in the 17th century. Read the full description.

11133583_small In northern Europe, we tend to think of immigration as a new phenomenon, but people have always been on the move. The 17th-century Dutch republic, especially Amsterdam, became a magnet for waves of immigrants because of Holland’s wealth and relatively tolerant climate. The immigrants included men and women from the southern Netherlands, Germany, and Scandinavians, but also Jews from both the Iberian peninsula and eastern Europe, and the Puritans who went on to become America’s Founding Fathers. These immigrants had a deep impact on the shaping of what was to become Dutch culture and language, because they arrived in the very early, formative years of the Dutch Republic, and that influence is evident to this day.

To hear the full audio, sign up for a free PRX account or log in.

Also in the RN Documentaries series

Piece image

An Angel-headed Hipster's Howl (29:30)
From: Radio Netherlands Worldwide

Fifty year's after the publication of Allen Ginsberg's poem "Howl" and its subsequent obscenity trial, poets and friends look back at its origins, impact and relevance today.
Piece image

RN Documentary: Raising Cain(e) with Mahler (29:31)
From: Radio Netherlands Worldwide

American jazz pianist and composer Uri Caine talks about his interpretations of work by Austrian composer Gustav Mahler.
Piece image

RN Documentary: The Music of Love (Valentine's Day special) (30:59)
From: Radio Netherlands Worldwide

Seated at his Bechstein grand, concert pianist and astrologer Gary Goldschneider talks to Dheera Sujan about the music inspired by and written about love - illustrating with ...
Piece image

RN Documentary: Cavalry, Caravans and Christians: Genghis Khan and Europe's first global age (29:30)
From: Radio Netherlands Worldwide

The lasting impact of the Mongol invasions on Europe, 800 years after Genghis Khan united the Mongols into one nation.
Piece image

RN Documentary: Driving out the Filth in Zimbabwe (31:00)
From: Radio Netherlands Worldwide

A year and a half ago, the Zimbabwean government destroyed the livelihoods of 2.5 million Zimbabweans and made 700,000 people homeless. Nothing has been done to help the victims.
Piece image

RN Documentary: Modern Day Mongolia (29:30)
From: Radio Netherlands Worldwide

Mongolia in the 21st century must choose which aspects of modernity and tradition will shape its identity in the 21st century.
Piece image

RN Documentary: Seamus Heaney: Bogging In Again (29:30)
From: Radio Netherlands Worldwide

Poet and Nobel laureate revisits dark past in response to recent wars and violence
Piece image

RN Documentary: Taming the Salt Monster (29:29)
From: Radio Netherlands Worldwide

The great swathes of the Western Australian wheatbelt were created a century ago when 1000 acres of bush were burned a day and the land became the nation?s breadbasket. ...
Piece image

RN Documentary: A Christmas Edition of The Stars of Music with Gary Goldschneider and Dheera Sujan (29:59)
From: Radio Netherlands Worldwide

Concert pianist and astrologer Gary Goldschneider talks to Dheera Sujan about the origins of Christmas music.
Piece image

RN Documentary: Law and Peace Part I (29:30)
From: Radio Netherlands Worldwide

Why has The Hague become the centre for International peace and justice.

Piece Description

In northern Europe, we tend to think of immigration as a new phenomenon, but people have always been on the move. The 17th-century Dutch republic, especially Amsterdam, became a magnet for waves of immigrants because of Holland’s wealth and relatively tolerant climate. The immigrants included men and women from the southern Netherlands, Germany, and Scandinavians, but also Jews from both the Iberian peninsula and eastern Europe, and the Puritans who went on to become America’s Founding Fathers. These immigrants had a deep impact on the shaping of what was to become Dutch culture and language, because they arrived in the very early, formative years of the Dutch Republic, and that influence is evident to this day.

Transcript

SCRIPT: IMMIGRATION DOCO
“The First Newcomers
Broadcast Date: Wed. Oct 19 + Fri Oct. 21, 2005”
Production Number 1005970
Duration 29’30”

MUSIC: “Prince Alemande”E. Adriaensen comp., T.Satoh uitv., “Lute Music from the Netherlands, Radio Netherlands Transcription Service, BFO – 16, 3 minutes total

1 In the 17th century, just as now, millions of people were on the move. They were searching for a better life, a place of refuge from natural disasters, war, poverty and persecution. Many of these migrants drifted to the young Dutch republic, especially to the rich province of Holland and its capital Amsterdam. This young country had become the center of a immensely wealthy trading empire and a unique new culture. (32”)

PRAK 3: The old-fashinoned…remarkable. (32”)

INTRO Radio Netherlands presents: The Early/First Newcomers/Outsiders:
Immigration in the Dutch Golden Age...
Read the full transcript

Musical Works

“Prince Alemande”, E. Adriaensen comp., T.Satoh uitv., “Lute Music from the Netherlands, Radio Netherlands Transcription Service, BFO – 16, 3 minutes total
carts [Gateway, GDC4607.8]{45”},
horses [Essential Sound Effects, BBC, CD792]{20 sec},
market [Typisch Nederlandse Geluiden, KMP, 1010CD]{1’30”},
carillon [Dutch Singing Towers, “Comt Nu met ang, P.Post comp., D. Donker uitv., Dureco 115.363.2 {30 sec}
Weespertrekvaart Mannenkoor, WTML 131.496.tr2 {30”}
“Avinu Malkenu”, comp. Yossele Rosenblatt, uitv. Hazzan and Uriel Moskovits, < “Mokum, Jerusalem of the West”, Jewish Historical Museum Amsterdam JHM, BTR0401

Related Website

www2.rnw.nl/rnw/en/specialseries/migration/051018doc?view=Standard