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I-69: Are We There Yet?

From: WFIU
Length: 58:22

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Documentary about the future Interstate 69, presenting various sides of the issue and explaining the complications that INDOT has faced in its attempt to complete the corridor through Indiana. Read the full description.

I-69_icon_small The U.S. Department of Transportation has called Interstate 69 one of America's six Corridors of the Future. Its route from Port Huron, Michigan, south through Indiana, Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, Arkansas and Louisiana to Brownsville, Texas is intended to facilitate trade with Canada and Mexico.

In the documentary, I-69: Are We There Yet?, from Indiana Public Media (WFIU and WTIU), we look at how the winding history of a highway informs the issues at hand today.

In Indiana, I-69 exists in two disconnected portions. When Governor Mitch Daniels took office, he pledged to connect the highway from Evansville to Indianapolis, citing the economic development potential.

The state's Department of Transportation (INDOT) has awarded bids to contractors to build the road, but much about the project - including the route it will take and where the funding will come from - remains uncertain.

Opponents are complaining about everything from the loss of farmland, forested areas, wetlands and rare species to the need to subsidize the project through federal dollars or private toll collection. This documentary presents the various sides of the issue and explains the complications that INDOT has faced in its attempt to complete the corridor.

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Piece Description

The U.S. Department of Transportation has called Interstate 69 one of America's six Corridors of the Future. Its route from Port Huron, Michigan, south through Indiana, Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, Arkansas and Louisiana to Brownsville, Texas is intended to facilitate trade with Canada and Mexico.

In the documentary, I-69: Are We There Yet?, from Indiana Public Media (WFIU and WTIU), we look at how the winding history of a highway informs the issues at hand today.

In Indiana, I-69 exists in two disconnected portions. When Governor Mitch Daniels took office, he pledged to connect the highway from Evansville to Indianapolis, citing the economic development potential.

The state's Department of Transportation (INDOT) has awarded bids to contractors to build the road, but much about the project - including the route it will take and where the funding will come from - remains uncertain.

Opponents are complaining about everything from the loss of farmland, forested areas, wetlands and rare species to the need to subsidize the project through federal dollars or private toll collection. This documentary presents the various sides of the issue and explains the complications that INDOT has faced in its attempt to complete the corridor.

Related Website

http://indianapublicmedia.org/news/special-features/i-69-are-we-there-yet/