Caption: A woodpecker foraging for food in the Cache River basin in southern Illinois, Credit: Photo by Kevin Boucher
Image by: Photo by Kevin Boucher 
A woodpecker foraging for food in the Cache River basin in southern Illinois 

The Illinois Wildlife of John James Audubon

From: Kevin Boucher
Length: 05:18

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When the famous naturalist John James Audubon traveled through southern Illinois in 1811-12 he saw many animals that are no longer in the prairie state.

Woodpecker121308_small In 1811 and 1812 the artist and naturalist John James Audubon walked across the southern third of Illinois, from the Mississippi to the Ohio river.  Along the way he fell in love with the land and the wildlife and wrote extensive journals about his experiences.  Peoria Illinois-based Brian "Fox" Ellis is an educator and professional storyteller who has been studying Audubon's journals for years,  and in this segment Brian makes Audubon's encounters with the wildlife of 1811 Illinois come alive-and includes a wonderful story about an animal that Audubon saw, that you can still see today in the Prairie State.

Piece Description

In 1811 and 1812 the artist and naturalist John James Audubon walked across the southern third of Illinois, from the Mississippi to the Ohio river.  Along the way he fell in love with the land and the wildlife and wrote extensive journals about his experiences.  Peoria Illinois-based Brian "Fox" Ellis is an educator and professional storyteller who has been studying Audubon's journals for years,  and in this segment Brian makes Audubon's encounters with the wildlife of 1811 Illinois come alive-and includes a wonderful story about an animal that Audubon saw, that you can still see today in the Prairie State.

Additional Credits

Brian "Fox" Ellis, Environmental Educator based in Peoria Illinois
Ryne Testa, former music student at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale Illinois