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Caption: Jennifer Hemsley with daughter, Pearl and Hazel (R), 2007, Credit: Jennifer Hemsley
Image by: Jennifer Hemsley 
Jennifer Hemsley with daughter, Pearl and Hazel (R), 2007 

Corruption in International Adoption

From: Amy Costello
Series: Tiny Spark
Length: 19:35

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Tiny Spark takes a look at a seemingly good idea - international adoption - and explores its unintended consequences: corruption, fraud and child trafficking. Our story coincides with the release this month (Dec, 2011) of Erin Siegal's new book on adoption fraud in Guatemala.

Pearlhazelmommy_small In our inaugural episode, Tiny Spark takes a look at corruption in international adoption. Our story conincides with the release of Erin Siegal's latest book, "The U.S. Embassy Cables: Adoption Fraud in Guatemala 1987-2010". The book contains memos, emails, and cables from the U.S. Embassy in Guatemala; correspondence which has never been released, until now.

The focus of our segment is Guatemala. We speak to adoptive mother, Jennifer Hemsley (photo included in attachments).  When she and her husband began the process of adopting a girl from Guatemala, they suspected fraud and feared the infant may have been kidnapped. “We were very concerned that [Hazel's] mother might be looking for her,” Jennifer tells us.

Hemsley says she could’ve ignored her own suspicions and adopted the girl anyway. “But I couldn’t do that, “Hemsley said. “That wouldn’t have been right.”

So Hemsley undertook a years-long quest for the truth. Along the way, she endured the scorn of a U.S. adoption agency, her sanity was questioned by Guatemelan lawyers and officials, and many American adoptive parents turned on her.

Hemsley’s story is a complex, nuanced exploration of what it means to make “right” choices on behalf of a girl, in another country, who needs a home.

We also speak with Erin Siegal, author of the new book, Finding Fernanda (photo included in attachments). Siegal’s book investigates corruption in Guatemala’s international adoption system.

Using the Freedom of Information Act, Siegal gained access to a trove of cables from the U.S. embassy in Guatemala, which reveal the extent of the American government’s concerns about aiding and abetting child trafficking. The entire collection of cables is being released this month in a 718-page book, "The U.S. Embassy Cables: Adoption Fraud in Guatemala 1987-2010".

Siegal tells us, “The cables show that there was always some corruption, there were always women selling their children, and the embassy knew that. There were always imposter birth mothers showing up and relinquishing children that weren’t biologically related to them. And there were always financial incentives that did drive this corruption and the Embassy did know that.”

This episode combines an emotional narrtative with riveting investigative reporting. It gives listeners an appreciation for the moral and ethical complexities behind international adoption.

About the host:

Amy Costello has spent the past decade reporting on some of the most pressing human rights issues of the day. For four years, she was the Africa Correspondent for The World, a co-production of the BBC World Service, Public Radio International and WGBH Boston. Her stories were heard by millions of listeners across the United States and around the globe.  She has reported for National Public Radio, PBS television, and the BBC World Service. Her PBS television story for FRONTLINE/World, Sudan: The Quick and the Terrible was nominated for an Emmy Award.

Amy was a producer at National Public Radio for three years before she moved to Africa.  She has worked as an adjunct professor at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, her alma mater. From her base in New York, Amy has continued to report on human rights issues, moderating podcasts for UNICEF, Human Rights Watch and the recent PBS television miniseries, Women, War & Peace. She also reported a follow-up story for FRONTLINE/World on the PlayPump, a celebrated idea designed to “do good”.  Along the way she uncovered myriad problems with the technology, an experience which would become the impetus for Tiny Spark.

Piece Description

In our inaugural episode, Tiny Spark takes a look at corruption in international adoption. Our story conincides with the release of Erin Siegal's latest book, "The U.S. Embassy Cables: Adoption Fraud in Guatemala 1987-2010". The book contains memos, emails, and cables from the U.S. Embassy in Guatemala; correspondence which has never been released, until now.

The focus of our segment is Guatemala. We speak to adoptive mother, Jennifer Hemsley (photo included in attachments).  When she and her husband began the process of adopting a girl from Guatemala, they suspected fraud and feared the infant may have been kidnapped. “We were very concerned that [Hazel's] mother might be looking for her,” Jennifer tells us.

Hemsley says she could’ve ignored her own suspicions and adopted the girl anyway. “But I couldn’t do that, “Hemsley said. “That wouldn’t have been right.”

So Hemsley undertook a years-long quest for the truth. Along the way, she endured the scorn of a U.S. adoption agency, her sanity was questioned by Guatemelan lawyers and officials, and many American adoptive parents turned on her.

Hemsley’s story is a complex, nuanced exploration of what it means to make “right” choices on behalf of a girl, in another country, who needs a home.

We also speak with Erin Siegal, author of the new book, Finding Fernanda (photo included in attachments). Siegal’s book investigates corruption in Guatemala’s international adoption system.

Using the Freedom of Information Act, Siegal gained access to a trove of cables from the U.S. embassy in Guatemala, which reveal the extent of the American government’s concerns about aiding and abetting child trafficking. The entire collection of cables is being released this month in a 718-page book, "The U.S. Embassy Cables: Adoption Fraud in Guatemala 1987-2010".

Siegal tells us, “The cables show that there was always some corruption, there were always women selling their children, and the embassy knew that. There were always imposter birth mothers showing up and relinquishing children that weren’t biologically related to them. And there were always financial incentives that did drive this corruption and the Embassy did know that.”

This episode combines an emotional narrtative with riveting investigative reporting. It gives listeners an appreciation for the moral and ethical complexities behind international adoption.

About the host:

Amy Costello has spent the past decade reporting on some of the most pressing human rights issues of the day. For four years, she was the Africa Correspondent for The World, a co-production of the BBC World Service, Public Radio International and WGBH Boston. Her stories were heard by millions of listeners across the United States and around the globe.  She has reported for National Public Radio, PBS television, and the BBC World Service. Her PBS television story for FRONTLINE/World, Sudan: The Quick and the Terrible was nominated for an Emmy Award.

Amy was a producer at National Public Radio for three years before she moved to Africa.  She has worked as an adjunct professor at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, her alma mater. From her base in New York, Amy has continued to report on human rights issues, moderating podcasts for UNICEF, Human Rights Watch and the recent PBS television miniseries, Women, War & Peace. She also reported a follow-up story for FRONTLINE/World on the PlayPump, a celebrated idea designed to “do good”.  Along the way she uncovered myriad problems with the technology, an experience which would become the impetus for Tiny Spark.

Intro and Outro

INTRO:

PROPOSED HOST INTRO:

In recent years, adoption fraud has been uncovered in several nations – most recently China and Ethiopia.

Erin Siegal has just written a book on the topic. It’s called “Finding Fernanda” and investigates fraud in Guatemala’s adoption system… a nation that used to be one of the top nations for American families to adopt from.

This month, author Erin Siegal releases ANOTHER book…this time a collection of memos and emails from the U.S. Embassy in Guatemala. The book, “The U.S. Embassy Cables in Guatemala: 1987 – 2010” contains never-before-released correspondence. The letters highlight the concerns of embassy officials in Guatemala that children bound for American adoptive homes were sometimes stolen and trafficked by smugglers.

Journalist Amy Costello interviewed Siegal about adoption fraud for Tiny Spark, a new interview program about the Business of Doing Good. International adoption is seen, by and large, as a benevolent act. But as we’ll hear in this segment, there is a dark underside to the industry.

START TAPE:

IN: (THEME MUSIC) Welcome to Tiny Spark. I'm Amy Costello..."

OUT: ...Thanks for listening, I'm Amy Costello."

OUTRO:

Musical Works

Title Artist Album Label Year Length
La Tra (Basephunk Mix) Omar Sosa Mulatos Remix. Otá Records 2005 05:06

Additional Credits

Generous funding from the Chronicle of Philanthropy.

Related Website

www.tinyspark.org