Caption: Sequence of sediment trap samples from Dec 2001 to Apr 2002 (courtesy of R. Thunell, University of South Carolina).  Sediment trap recovery onboard the Hermano Gines. Credit: IMaRS and EDIMAR.  Flasks and buoys measuring productivity. Credit: IMaRS and ED, Credit: IMaRS and EDIMAR.
Image by: IMaRS and EDIMAR. 
Sequence of sediment trap samples from Dec 2001 to Apr 2002 (courtesy of R. Thunell, University of South Carolina). Sediment trap recovery onboard the Hermano Gines. Credit: IMaRS and EDIMAR. Flasks and buoys measuring productivity. Credit: IMaRS and ED 

A Diary of Dirt. Un Cuento Sobre el Clima.

From: Ari Daniel
Series: Ocean Gazing
Length: 08:49

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Our planet Earth lays down a record of its climate on the seafloor in certain parts of the world. All you have to do is know how to read it.

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Frank Muller-Karger is an oceanographer at the University of South Florida where he directs the Institute for Marine Remote Sensing.

He says, “If we’re seeing something today that may have been similar to what we saw in the past, we can understand which way the planet is going to change in the future.”

Muller-Karger is using both the seafloor and satellites to figure out our past and future climate. And he’s working hand in hand with a country that’s very special to him. Have a listen.

Piece Description

Frank Muller-Karger is an oceanographer at the University of South Florida where he directs the Institute for Marine Remote Sensing.

He says, “If we’re seeing something today that may have been similar to what we saw in the past, we can understand which way the planet is going to change in the future.”

Muller-Karger is using both the seafloor and satellites to figure out our past and future climate. And he’s working hand in hand with a country that’s very special to him. Have a listen.

Transcript

Muller-Karger: Bienvenidos a Ocean Gazing. Esto está buenísimo.

Ari: That’s Frank Muller-Karger, welcoming us in Spanish to Ocean Gazing. I’m Ari Daniel Shapiro.

Muller-Karger: If we’re seeing something today that may have been similar to what we saw in the past, we can understand which way the planet is going to change in the future.

Ari: Muller-Karger is an oceanographer at the University of South Florida where he directs the Institute for Marine Remote Sensing. He’s using both the seafloor and satellites to figure out our past and future climate. And he’s working hand in hand with a country that’s very special to him. Stay tuned.

Ari: I notice that some of your work takes place in Venezuela, and that you’re wearing a shirt from Venezuela, and so I’m just wondering what your connection to that country is.

Muller-Karger: My connection is deep....
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Intro and Outro

INTRO:

A live host could use one of the following suggested intros:

Next up, our special series, Ocean Gazing with Ari Daniel Shapiro from COSEE NOW.
OR
From COSEE NOW, here's Ari Daniel Shapiro for Ocean Gazing.

OUTRO:

Our story is part of the series Ocean Gazing. It's produced by COSEE NOW with support from the National Science Foundation. For more information, go to www.oceangazing.org.

Additional Credits

The work described in this episode was funded by the National Science Foundation and the Venezuelan government.

Related Website

http://coseenow.net/podcast/2010/08/dirt/