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Last Meals Not to Die For

From: Nathan Callahan
Series: The SoCal Byte
Length: 07:07

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On Unneeded Business Meetings and Death Penalty Catering

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In current times of service societies, last meals are confusing, if not pointless, exercises.  Are they a Make a Wish Foundation last right?  Or are they our government’s way of saying “Hi, my name is Rick. I’ll be your executioner, today.  You’re about to receive a lethal injection, but first how may we serve you? 

Piece Description

In current times of service societies, last meals are confusing, if not pointless, exercises.  Are they a Make a Wish Foundation last right?  Or are they our government’s way of saying “Hi, my name is Rick. I’ll be your executioner, today.  You’re about to receive a lethal injection, but first how may we serve you? 

Transcript

Last Meals Not to Die For
On Unneeded Business Meetings and Death Penalty Catering

There are times you don’t need to eat. For example: at business meetings and waiting for your execution.

Last meals, like desert island lists, aren’t so much nourishment as “best of” top ten popularity rankings: “What food would you like to take with you on a desert Island? — in this case, the Island of Death.

But last meals are also last statements — a culinary tombstone if you will. The pre-execution serving for Ted Bundy of steak, eggs, hash browns and coffee means something entirely different than “Tookie” Williams bowl of oatmeal and milk.

In the good old days of guillotines, last meals served as a foregiveness card — from the executioner to the executionee and back again. Since communal snacking was a gesture of friendship, last meals were exercises in bonding (as far as that goes). The e...
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