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Global Ethics Corner: Libya After Qaddafi: Redefining our Responsibilities

From: Carnegie Council
Length: 02:00

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As Libya prepares for its future, do NATO member states have a moral responsibility to protect peace and stability? Or should Libya's future be of its own making? What do you think? Read the full description.

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Created and managed by Carnegie Council Ethics Studio and written by Senior Fellow William Vocke, Global Ethics Corner is a weekly 2 minute segment devoted to newsworthy ethical issues.

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Piece Description

Created and managed by Carnegie Council Ethics Studio and written by Senior Fellow William Vocke, Global Ethics Corner is a weekly 2 minute segment devoted to newsworthy ethical issues.

Transcript

In the aftermath of regime change, does the "responsibility to protect" change too?

With the prospect of a rebel victory in Libya, all eyes have turned to NATO. Having won accolades for their multilateral intervention, Europe and the U.S. must now decide their role in Libya post-Qaddafi.

Libya's rebels are a fractious group. No one knows if they will remain united—let alone peaceful—once Qaddafi is gone.

Libya also lacks a tradition of democracy. There are no functional institutions for Libyans to draw upon.

Given such uncertainty, what is the international community's responsibility in the months, and possibly, years to come? Should NATO pack up and go?

For many, the answer is yes. They say that NATO overstepped its bounds in Libya. To avoid mission creep, the U.S. and Europe must reset their sites on domestic concerns.

Others question the utility of an international presence. The...
Read the full transcript

Additional Credits

Deborah Carroll- Producer
William Vocke- Writer
Marlene Spoerri- Contributing Writer
Julia Kennedy- Content Editor
Robert Smithline- Editor
Terence Hurley- Editor
Gusta Johnson- Production Assistant

Related Website

www.carnegiecouncil.org