Caption: The coal ash landfill at Louisville Gas & Electric's Cane Run Power Station rises above a pauper's cemetery in southwest Louisville., Credit: Erica Peterson
Image by: Erica Peterson 
The coal ash landfill at Louisville Gas & Electric's Cane Run Power Station rises above a pauper's cemetery in southwest Louisville. 

Part Three

From: WFPL News
Series: Coal Ash Scares, Sickens Louisville Residents
Length: 03:32

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Though people have serious concerns about the coal ash, the power company isn't breaking the law. The EPA has yet to weigh in on coal combustion products. Read the full description.
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Part Three
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WFPL News

Graveyard_small The final installment of the three-part series takes a look at the local, state and federal regulations that are regulating (or failing to regulate) coal ash. There's also a discussion on coal ash recycling, which could be the answer for the unused piles of coal ash, but is still controversial. 

More from WFPL News

Caption: The coal ash landfill at Louisville's Gas & Electric Cane Run Power Station, Credit: Erica Peterson

Coal Ash Concerns: Documentary (12:04)
From: WFPL News

The full, 12-minute version of the story combines all three pieces into one seamless documentary.
Caption: The ash landfill, partially covered with grass, at Louisville Gas & Electric's Cane Run Power Station in Louisville., Credit: Erica Peterson

Part Two (03:30)
From: WFPL News

The power company tries to reassure residents that nothing is wrong. But despite problems with the current landfill, they're still planning a second one on the site.
Caption: Smokestacks rise above Louisville Gas & Electric's Cane Run Power Station in southwest Louisville, Credit: Erica Peterson

Part One (03:34)
From: WFPL News

Residents in Louisville say coal ash from a nearby landfill is contaminating their homes.
Caption: A truck in Harlan, Ky., proclaims its support for coal and coal miners., Credit: Erica Peterson/WFPL

Hollowed Mountains, Now Hollowed Towns: Coal in Eastern Kentucky (18:17)
From: WFPL News

Coal is embedded into the culture and image of Eastern Kentucky, but the industry is declining in the region. And it's declining permanently. The coal miners—who've known ...
Piece image

No End in Sight for Clash Between Residents, Rubbertown Industry (04:22)
From: WFPL News

There aren't any perfect solutions for resolving concerns about the effects on industry on nearby residents' health.
Piece image

Interstate Traffic Makes Air Quality in Rubbertown Worse (04:19)
From: WFPL News

Vehicle pollution adds to the air and health concerns experienced by residents near Louisville's Rubbertown.
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Southwest Louisville Residents Still Concerned About Long-Dormant Landfill (04:09)
From: WFPL News

Residents worry they're still being exposed to the toxic waste buried in the Lees Lane Landfill during the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s.
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Riverside Gardens: A Former Resort Community Besieged By Pollution (04:40)
From: WFPL News

The residents of Riverside Gardens, a place built for Louisville residents to escape urban pollution, now have to contend with chemical plants, a power plant and a former ...
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Patients, Widows, Researchers Still Dealing With Toxic Legacy of Rubbertown Chemical (04:38)
From: WFPL News

Scientists know the chemical vinyl chloride causes liver cancer because 26 former Rubbertown workers have died from the disease.
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Lung, Colon Cancer Rates Higher Near Rubbertown Than Other Louisville Neighborhoods (04:05)
From: WFPL News

Lung and colon cancer rates are higher near Rubbertown than in other comparable neighborhoods, but it's unknown what role the environment plays in those rates.

Piece Description

The final installment of the three-part series takes a look at the local, state and federal regulations that are regulating (or failing to regulate) coal ash. There's also a discussion on coal ash recycling, which could be the answer for the unused piles of coal ash, but is still controversial. 

Intro and Outro

INTRO:

All week, we've brought you stories about coal ash and its effects on the health of several residents of southwest Louisville. They live near Louisville Gas and Electric's Cane Run Power Station. But while the residents and a number of scientists insist coal ash is toxic, it's still not regulated by the federal government.

In the final piece of a three-part series, WFPL’s Erica Peterson looks at the scant regulations that are governing coal ash, and whether they’re adequate.

OUTRO:

Related Website

http://www.wfpl.org/2011/07/22/coal-ash-scares-sickens-southwest-louisville-neighborhood-part-three/