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Caption: The coal ash landfill at Louisville Gas & Electric's Cane Run Power Station rises above a pauper's cemetery in southwest Louisville., Credit: Erica Peterson
Image by: Erica Peterson 
The coal ash landfill at Louisville Gas & Electric's Cane Run Power Station rises above a pauper's cemetery in southwest Louisville. 

Part Three

From: WFPL News
Series: Coal Ash Scares, Sickens Louisville Residents
Length: 03:32

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Though people have serious concerns about the coal ash, the power company isn't breaking the law. The EPA has yet to weigh in on coal combustion products.
Playing
Part Three
From
WFPL News

Graveyard_small The final installment of the three-part series takes a look at the local, state and federal regulations that are regulating (or failing to regulate) coal ash. There's also a discussion on coal ash recycling, which could be the answer for the unused piles of coal ash, but is still controversial. 

Piece Description

The final installment of the three-part series takes a look at the local, state and federal regulations that are regulating (or failing to regulate) coal ash. There's also a discussion on coal ash recycling, which could be the answer for the unused piles of coal ash, but is still controversial. 

Intro and Outro

INTRO:

All week, we've brought you stories about coal ash and its effects on the health of several residents of southwest Louisville. They live near Louisville Gas and Electric's Cane Run Power Station. But while the residents and a number of scientists insist coal ash is toxic, it's still not regulated by the federal government.

In the final piece of a three-part series, WFPL’s Erica Peterson looks at the scant regulations that are governing coal ash, and whether they’re adequate.

OUTRO:

Related Website

http://www.wfpl.org/2011/07/22/coal-ash-scares-sickens-southwest-louisville-neighborhood-part-three/